Christmas aboard Titanic


Apr 22, 2012
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Jared,

While it doesn't fit with the Christmas theme of this thread, the reason they scrapped Olympic was the same reason most ships were eventually scrapped: They were old or they were no longer useful to the line (meaning they no longer attracted passengers); or both.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
Apr 23, 2002
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I think in the 1930's and the past in general there wasnt really a aim in keeping things for nostalgia.
Plus, Titanic was only 23 years since the Titanic disaster and probably there wasnt the interest there is today.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Greg is quite right. The Titanic tragedy was overshadowed by World War I and the Halifax Explosion; not to mention other events. It wasn't until 1955 when "A Night to Remember" was published that interest in the tragedy was resurrected. After that came the movie based on the book, the forming of the Titanic Historical Society, etc.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
J

Jonathan Payette

Guest
You may find some parallels in the Majestic's christmas for I932 at : http://www.geocities.com/White_Star_Liners/Majestic-II.html

There is numerous images and one of them is a picture of Majestic's christmas menu. If you don't have cable connection, like myself, it may take a while to load the page until the menu, but still interesting.

Cheers,
Jonathan
 
C

Camron Miller

Guest
Christmas, I feel, despite the commercialism of our age, has never been better. Prior to her death, my great-great-step-grandmother (who I have mentioned before, but who was very nice and so interesting, as she was a servant in the so -called "Gilded Age"), told me about Christmas prior to the Great War. As Jesus' birthday, Christmas Day was to be treated just like a Sunday. Therefore, no toys or books to be given or read that were not religious, Sunday best was to be worn (typically the tightest fitting, most uncomfortable clothes), and singing was unheard of. All gifts were exchanged on Christmas Eve, which was spent at home, playing the piano and singing, reading aloud, playing parlour games, and enjoying each others company. At least, it was for the family. The servants were still toiling downstairs and in vacated rooms, while my grandmother had the somewhat easier task of sitting quietly in a corner waiting to take her three young charges upstairs to the nurseries when they became tired, and started to throw tantrums.
Christmas Day was started off with a church service, followed by a walk. Upon returning, Christmas luncheon was taken. The afternoon was spent paying calls to family and friends. The servants, meanwhile, got the afternoon off as soon as the dishes were done and cold turkey laid out ready for a light supper, having spent the morning slaving to get lunch ready.
My grandmother never, however, explained what would happen if Christmas Eve fell on a Sunday, thereby making present giving impossible. The mind boggles...
 

Lee Gilliland

Member
Feb 14, 2003
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The subject naturally occurs considering the season that there would have been some sort of festivity aboard ship this time of year - I am assuming a tree, maybe one in each class, as well as addition services on Christmas Day? I have been reading of the liners in the '20s and '30s with their Santa Clauses and such, but I would assume that would be a more modern tradition.
 

Andrew McNeal

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Aug 5, 2005
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I'm sure Christmas Eve, not Christmas Day, would be when everyone is singing, eating, and dancing. I can only imagine how the ship would have looked decorated with more lights (did they have Christmas lights back then?), wreaths, and other various Christmas decorations.
 
Dec 31, 2003
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Hampstead, London
Andrew: Yes, they had sets of colourful electric lights for Christmas trees even before 1912. I can see in my mind's eye one we brought out every year when I was a boy. It had been a family tradition to do that every year since it was purchased in 1910. I remember it having many little glass figures: trees, houses, snowmen, cookies, candy and fruit. I most vividly recall the bunches of grapes - which looked 'wet'! Don
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
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For what it's worth...

The New York Times, 20 December 1906

TAKES A TON OF TURKEYS
---
A Good Xmas Dinner Assured on the Baltic--Fight on the Pier
---
The White Star liner Baltic, which sailed yesterday for Liverpool,
carried 3,341 bags of Christmas mail and a ton of turkeys for the
Christmas dinners aboard. A good dinner will be served to all on board
on that day. The first-class passengers will get champagne, and the
second-class passengers claret. The Royal Welsh Male Choir, who are
returning after a tour, will help to furnish entertainment on Christmas
night.

Those on the pier witnessed an amusing incident just before the vessel
sailed. An elderly Irishman was down to the pier with his wife to see a
friend off. The man met a woman who was sailing, and who was unknown to
his wife. He escorted her on board, and when his better half caught
sight of him coming off she rushed up, and demanded to know who his
"female" friend was. The husband's reply evidently was not satisfactory,
for she struck him on the head, jammed his hat down over his eyes, and
then hurried from the pier.

-30-
 

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