Coal from the Titanic

J

Jeff Kelley

Guest
The good news is that those necklaces are still available (at least they were in Toronto last September). I am not sure if they are available on-line, but any of the exhibits should have them.
 
G

George Huck

Member
I was quite happy with Bob's reply to my question about where the peice of coal I have came from. The following debate seemed to have graged on a bit, probably for its own sake. It did come from the Titanic itself which is all that really matters to me. As to wearing it as jelewry that I can t get my heard around. What strange people there are out there. Maybe there are people who have bits of the World Trade Centre round their necks too.However in whatever form I think that such things do give an intimacy that can t be achieved in any other way. I am still on a honeymoon with my piece of coal.It went down with ship and now sits in Alice Springs. If it is welsh or yank it remains of the Titanic.But long live discussion and debate on any aspect of this fascinating man made event.
 
D

Dana Cantu

Guest
Wow George,

Thank you for calling me strange. I don't think I'd wear it but I'd keep it in my jewelry box for safe keeping and I'd just look at it once in awhile. No I wouldn't wear it. I have a heart.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>As to wearing it as jelewry that I can t get my heard around. What strange people there are out there.<<

Is it any stranger then people who wear necklaces with holy water from Lourdes or fragments alleged to be from The One True Cross? (I won't bother getting into whether or not the claims for both even have merit since it really doesn't matter in this context.) People have a taste for momenotos of important places and events. Far from being strange, jewelry made from pieces of Titanic are completely understandable.

Which doesn't mean I'm argueing that it's rational, only that it's understandable.
 
D

dave green

Member
it says in riddle of titanic ,that olympic brought back sacks of coal in public rooms .
for use aboard titanic.
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Hello Dave,

Take anything that the book says, with a grain of salt. It's filled with fiction, especially when it comes to the switch theory.
 
R

Russell Friesen

Member
Hi Dave, John Maxtone-Graham's book "The Only Way to Cross" also mentions this. Quote from page 61: "Most of the Titanic's coal was a scratch lot, much of it coming from New York in the bunkers and public rooms of the Olympic; Southampton was in the grip of a coal strike again."

John Shaum's book "Majesty at Sea" reads on page 122: "To compensate [for the coal shortage], White Star scrounged up an adequate supply of coal from a variety of sources. The Olympic brought over a large amount of American coal, even carrying some of it in her public rooms."

Hope that helps you out.

Russell
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>Take anything that the book says, with a grain of salt.<<

Only a grain???

Actually, I think this may well be one of those instances where Riddle Of The Titanic had something in it that had a faint resemblance to reality. With the coal strike on, those lines which could were bringing as much spare coal as they could get across with them.
 
P

Paul Lee

Member
Although the WSL scrimped coal from other ships, the coal strike had been finished for a week by the time the Titanic sailed and supplies were starting to reach ships.
 
H

Holly Peterson

Guest
My cousin just gave me a crucifix necklace filled with coal from the Titanic. I smiled politely and said thank-you, but later I put it into a drawer. I don't wear necklaces, but even if I did, I found it kind of morbid and insulting.
 
M

Michael Cundiff

Member
It is morbid and insulting, the idea of a necklace w/TITANIC coal. However, if our beloved George Tulloch were still with us, it's highly unlikely the coal would have ran such a tainted course. It is one thing to raise, according to Matt Tulloch, a 75lb. piece of coal, subsequently disperse small samples to, furthur fund the exxpeditions, to *enthralled* near lifetime, TITANIC devotes as a papable conection to said event...all the while, standing ethical to an obligation of NOT seperating (to date) the retrieved *internationaly treasured* artifacts. From day one in 1987 there was far and away too much outcry of graverobbing shed on Mr. Tulloch...however, according to *the* renowned TITANIC artist, George Tulloch & the then, RMSTI/IFREMER were probably the most suited expedition team/preservationists suitable for attaining such a controversial endeavor. And as for your morbid and insulting slander...I give Arnie Gellar & his current RMSTI...

I ask that you harken back to the yrs. '86 & '87 respectively.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
M

Michael Cundiff

Member
As a follow up to my post #1000...

"The world wants to see and touch recovered artifacts from this historic ship. It is understandable and inevitable. Perhaps we are lucky that RMS Titanic Inc., is in chasrge. It could have been a lot worse.".

--Excerpt from "A TITANIC TASK: Confronting The Controversy Of Salvaging Artifacts, by Ken Marschall (USA Today/Nov 1995)--

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
petersh

petersh

Member
I bought my first coal piece in February 1996. It was my understanding (in the literature that came with the piece) that the sales of the coal would finance a new building to house all of the artifacts after the traveling road show was over. And the persons that purchased coal from this original release would have their names put in a conservators log in the museum. Later after Tulloch was ousted no one at RMST Inc seems to know anything about this.
 
Top