Coal loading


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Anders Mansfeldt

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Was it loaded trough the hatches to the baggage rooms and then in sacks / on trolleys to the bunkers ?

I would expect to find some kind of 'coal shafts' from the shelter deck or something, but i can't find anything that reminds me of such things...
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Adding to what Lester said, these coal chutes went directly down to the bunkers where men would move the coal to wherever it was needed to fill them up and level out the load, all of it manually. If you have the impression that this was one dirty, nasty, backbreaking swine of a job, your impression is dead bang on the money. It was. This was what's known to seamen as an "All hands evolution" and even the hotel staff got into the act by way of cleaning up coal dust which settled everywhere.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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From "Comparative Naval Architecture of Passenger Ships," Philip Sims (M), Naval Sea Systems Command:

"The use of side coaling ports explain why the almost universal hull color of 1900 vintage ships was black. Since the sides would be inevitably streaked with coal dust, black was the best color. Photos of the WWI hospital ships, such as the Britannic, show smudges along their white sides. Modern white hulls are possible only with oil fuel. The water tightness of side coaling ports after years of service would be questionable. Coaling chutes would continually bang the port lid. The red lead joints would have lumps of coal crushed into the soft material every time that it was closed. The crew had to reach into the dark and dirty trunk through a
small hole to attach hooks and screw them tight and had no means of inspecting or testing the tightness of the closure.

The Titanic has been widely criticized for having
low (although closely spaced) transverse bulkheads
forward. Note that the loading doors are just below “E Deck” at the top of “F Deck”. The Titanic’s formula of low-height but closely spaced
bulkheads was in order to protect the coal ports. In a bit of irony, probably because she was such a new ship, the Titanic’s coal ports appeared to have been essentially watertight during the ships actual sinking since there was not a rapid increase in flooding rate when the waterline reached them."
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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The Shipbuilder is silent on the matter of the actual bunkering methodology. I assume this emulated Cunard practice of the day in which case, if the vessel was alongside she would have to be ‘breasted off’ on booms so that the bunkering barges could be brought alongside both port and starboard; I assume it was impracticable to bunker from one side only.

I believe coal was supplied in bags. Staging would be rigged outboard of each coaling port and two men stationed thereon. The coaling ports consisted of hoppers which opened outwards from the shell plating.

Auxiliary electric winches would be rigged on the promenade decks with gear to elevate the (slings of?) bags from the barges to the coaling hoppers where the men on the staging would bleed the bags into the hoppers.

When the operation was complete the hoppers would be closed up and made sea-fast. Because these apertures impinged on the vessel’s reserve buoyancy I think the Carpenter was tasked to do this, reporting to the Chief Officer.

As for ash scavenging:

At sea, ash was tipped into a hopper set in the stokehold plating from which it was ejected on a stream of seawater exiting through the shell plating in way of the middle deck. In port, four steam driven ash hoists were used, but it’s not clear where these fetched up. I presume the detritus was worked to convenient shell doors.

Noel
 

Ben Lemmon

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Feb 6, 2008
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How big were the coal chutes that were used on the Titanic? Would a kid be able to fit into one? If so, would they hurt themselves falling into one? If you could respond to this message, that'd be great.

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally a separate thread, has been moved to this pre-existing thread discussing the same subject. MAB]
 
Mar 22, 2003
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I forgot to upload a cropped version from an F deck print that shows the details of one of the coal scuttles on the port side leading down to the bunkers. Here it is:

124224.gif
 

Ben Lemmon

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Since the coal chutes are obviously not going to work
eh.gif
, is there anyway that a child on the Titanic could have gotten into something dirty, like the coal? Or was that not likely?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Or was that not likely?<<

The only way would be to sneak down into the boiler rooms and from there, into the coal bunkers. With several guys in each shoveling coal, and trimmers constantly at work in the bunkers themselves, the chances of a child getting down there and into any of these spaces unnoticed are effectively zero.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Forget the coal, but there was plenty of oiled machinery, like winches and cranes, on the upper deck areas where passengers took their exercise. Very attractive to exploring children. Frank Goldsmith mentioned an occasion when he got his hands very dirty just swinging from a cable.
 
A

Anders Mansfeldt

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and why the #%¤@ was Frank G. swinging from a cable?

I assume that the coal-shafts are those I've highlighted in red on this F-deck blueprint?

124232.jpg
 

Ben Lemmon

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Because he was a kid, why else?? Do you really have to have a reason when you're that age?

The reason I have been asking is this: Would it be possible for a 2nd class passenger to be mistaken for a 3rd class because they got dirty? And where exactly were these cables? On the boat deck? A Deck? B Deck? C deck? D Deck? E deck? OK I'm going to stop now.
happy.gif
 

Bob Godfrey

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Whatever cable young Frankie was swinging on would have been on the fore or after well deck or the poop deck, to which the 3rd Class had access. But for 1st and 2nd Class kids there were plenty of cables and machinery on their promenade areas of the boat deck too, so just as much opportunity to get dirty. I wouldn't assume, though, that the typical 3rd Class kid was unkempt or unclean. For the boat trip their parents would have dressed them in their best and expected them to 'behave themselves' (wishful thinking, probably!). Frankie's mother was horrified when she saw the state he'd got into and immediately set to work scrubbing him clean. He probably got a 'clip round the ear' too.
 

Ben Lemmon

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I wasn't assuming they were dirty or unkempt. But then again, I'm not an officer or a person with authority on the Titanic. Do you think anyone in those positions may have made such a mistake?

The reason I want to know is because I would like to use it as a scene in a book. Is there any possible way for a Second class passenger to be mistaken as a Third class passenger?
 

Bob Godfrey

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It was the rank & file crew (stewards especially) who would most likely be chasing young explorers back to their designated areas. They had enough experience to be pretty good at identifying the Class of passengers (as they often did in their testimonies as the disaster inquiries) according usually to the way they were dressed, their speech and mannerisms etc. But there wouldn't have been an enormous difference in the dress style of 3rd Class kids in their Sunday best and Cabin Class kids (boys especially). If your character kept his mouth shut he (or she) might well get away with it, but stewards on the lookout for mischief would keep a closer eye on an unaccompanied child.
 

Alvin Dusaran

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Dec 18, 2010
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i'm just curious about how the coal is being loaded on the titanic?

Is it loaded into the ship cargo hatch? How it is delivered to the ship, is it by wooden box or by machinery similar to carousel or baggage distribution used in airport? After loading the coal into the ship where they begin to distribute it? do they shovel it from g deck until it fall to bottom? Where are the passageway if they distribute it from the g deck?

Sorry for too much question and grammar, i'm just curious.

AlvinD

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in an unrelated topic has been moved to the pre-existing one, which is discussing the same subject. JDT]
 
Jul 9, 2000
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If you see any plans of the ship, notably the shell plan, you'll notice a destinct row of doors along the side very near the waterline. When coaling the ship, these doors would be swung down to the horizontal and the coal would have been dumped down these scuttles directly into the bunkers. The trimmers would see to evening it out once it was down there.

There was no moving it through passageways and no need, but what there was a need for was to clean the ship up afterwards. The cloud of fine coal dust produced by this evolution got into everything.
 

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