Coca Cola on the Titanic

  • Thread starter Catherine Ehlers
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Catherine Ehlers

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Does anyone have any idea whether or not Coca-Cola was served in any of the dining saloons or restaurants on the Titanic?
 

Steve Arnold

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Coca-Cola was first marketed in 1886. And you do know, don't you, that one of the ingrediants in the original recipe was coccaine . . .
 
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Rolf Vonk

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Hi Steve,

Thanks for clearing that up. It's really shocking for me to know that there's coccaine in coca-cola! Do you know you can get serious braindamage of coca-cola? That's the reason why I never drink it, so my brains (and me too) stay fresh and young...
 

Steve Arnold

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I don't know when coccaine was removed from the recipe, but it was quite some time ago. I don't know whether it was pre or post Titanic. Now the only drug in it is caffeine.
 
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Rolf Vonk

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My god! All those beautifull coca-cola ladies (as shown in the advertisements) were under cocaine! I can imagine why they removed it from the recipe.

I don't think there was coca-cola onboard Titanic. I have no idea why, but I follow my feeling. It's so bad that there is no list of the Titanic proviands.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Coca-Cola was not the soft drink supplier on Titanic- for the moment I forget the company- it is still in New Jersey and still makes fizzy soft drinks-I will think of it in the middle of the night and post it later! Findlay- you will remember I know! The company once supplied all the soda at a Titanic International function.
 

Jim Kalafus

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STEVE- The Cocaine was removed pre-Titanic. There is an excellent chapter in "Big Secrets" outlining what actually IS in Coke which goes into detail about the whole cocaine semi-myth. Unfortunately, I am FAR removed from my personal library now, but if you can track down the book it is definitely a worthwhile read. As I recall, the Cocaine in Coca-Cola ca 1900 was a trace amount anyway, and the stories about being able to catch a high off of the soda (which WERE current in the pre-Titanic decade) were urban legends. However, you COULD buy all sorts of fun stuff over-the-counter at the time (check out the patent medicine pages in the repro 1897 Sears catalogue which contained, amongst other things knock-out drops for hyper children) so I suspect that there may have been a certain amount of unnatural giddiness aboard the Titanic.
 
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James- good to see you back. Yes, patent medicine is a little hobby of mine. Lydia Pinkham's medicinal compound for "ladies' complaints" was full of alcohol! Belladonna, laudanum, and narcotics of every imaginable description were liberally sprinkled into over-the-counter preparations with reckless abandon before the birth of the FDA regulations. Cosmetics-mostly for stage use- even contained lead and harmful coloring agents. Arsenic was plentiful- even taken to improve skintone (in a daily pinch!) and strychnine and cyanide was in many pest control products. Lizzie Borden could NOT get Prussic Acid though!
 
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Inger Sheil

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Ohhhhhhhh....Drinka drinka drinka
To Lily the Pink the Pink the Pink
Who sa-aved allllll
The hu-man ra-a-ace!!!
For she invented
Medicinal compound...

Etc etc. Sang it as a school girl. How does the rest of it go??

And how about those woman of the Romantic era who sucked on lead as well as applying arsenic to the complexion? Must get that pale, wasting away look...

Have we read the re-appraisal of the Madeleine Smith case? I went all those years thinking the chick was guilty, and now it seems it was all a plot by her lover to get the poor wench hanged! The 'Readers Digest' type condensed version of the case I'd read made no mention of the absence in his stomach contents of the dye with which arsenic was sold, precisely to identify its...erm...illicit use should it be used for anything other than poisoning rats.
 

Inger Sheil

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I'm sorry, Phil, but if you insist on bringing irrelevant revelant facts to this discussion I'm going to have to write to Phil and insist that you be officially reprimanded. If you continue with your pertinant posts, where will this board be?

A line must be drawn somewhere!
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Inger

"For she invented, Medicinal Compound,
Most efficacious in every case"

Lilly the Pink, she, took to drink, she,
Filled up with paraffin inside,
And despite her Medicinal Compound,
Sadly, Pickled Lilly Died"

Geoff
 
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Inger Sheil

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Geoff - thanks for skillfully averting our near miss with relevancy in Phil's post :)

Now that you've supplied the words, I'll be humming it all day tomorrow!

~ Inger
 

Jim Kalafus

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Inger- That was an interesting item you brought up about Madeleine Smith. I was not aware of that development- was it the subject of a book, or of an article? When it comes to poisoning cases which refuse to die...uh....refuse to go away, the "Maybrick" affair gets my vote as the most intriguingly convoluted. The Jack the Ripper tie-in gets my vote as the hands down dumbest JTR plot twist of them all. Worse, even, than the Walter Sickert "Final Solution" of the 1970's. THANK YOU for pulling Lily The Pink out of obscurity as well....you aren't the only one who will be bobbing around to that tune these next few days.
 

Inger Sheil

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James -

Here's the link for one of the Madeleine Smith sites. I only looked into it again in order to tease a colleague named Madeleine who was about to tie the knot with a bloke named 'Smith'. Was surprised to see just how much material there is relating to this 19th Century trial. I wasn't aware of much of it, simply subscribing to the view that she got the best defence lawyer a murderess ever had. Looks like justice may have been served after all, although the popular belief that she got away with murder will die hard.

Maybrick is indeed interesting - a miscarriage of justice in the case of his wife? And yes, that Jack the Ripper plot twist was one of the most bizarre tangents for it to take...the J the R equivelant of the Olympic/Titanic switch theory?

I'm grateful Geoff came to the rescue, because otherwise I'd be in the unhappy position of infuriatingly remembering only half the lyrics. While this would have been admirably useful in irritating my colleagues, it would also have aggravated me.

http://www.fix.law-firm.co.uk/

~ Inger
 
Apr 11, 2001
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After introducing Lydia Pinkham and observing the hilarious aftermath- do I dare broach Fletcher's Castoria- that fig-flavoured laxative -which I believe is still produced. It was -in my day- also a mixer for alcohol. I was not only a regular child- but cheerful. Thanks, granny- for the daily dose. But Castor Oil must take the prize for most widely consumed remedy of the age. Amazing so many survived patent medicine at-home doses. Or maybe the mistakes got buried....
 
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Nov 22, 2000
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How on earth did the Maybricks end up here? Battlecrease House is (or was) a stone's throw from my own house and Florence Maybrick's great, great grandson (I think that's the link!) was best man at my wedding! Small world isn't it?

Geoff
 
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