Coca Cola on the Titanic

  • Thread starter Catherine Ehlers
  • Start date

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,086
5
198
Shelley- I have a TV ad for Fletcher's Castoria circa 1958, in which a glum little girl is given a hearty dose and enjoys it so much she smiles and licks the spoon. Now THERE is an image which lingers. Next to the commercial for Winston Cigarettes starring the Flintstones (1965) it is most likely the oddest commercial ever.
 
Jan 22, 2001
63
0
136
Inger:
Thanks for the Madeleine Smith link. I've been trying to track down the video of the 1940's movie about her called "The Strange Case of
Madeleine" or sometimes just called "Madeleine". Also there was a fiction book about her called "Lovers All Untrue" by Nora Lofts. Have you ever seen either of these?

Carole
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
5,342
34
208
Hallo, Carole - I haven't seen the book or movie you're referring to, but they sound interesting. I've got a couple of the Norah Lofts biographies and find them a bit lightweight, although beautifully illustrated, but would like to read one of her novels. Have you checked out the ABE or one of the book search engines for the Lofts book?

I was chuffed when I first heard about the Madeleine (or 'Lena') link with the pre-Raphaelites.

Geoff - yah, that's right...that Maybrick chappie was one of you Scousers, wasn't he? Interesting connection there - presumably the great great grandson felt that she'd been dealt a rough blow by justice?

~ Ing
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,086
5
198
INGER- Thank you for that link. I'm going to be hunting around now for something equally well presented about Mrs. Maybrick. She's a hard one to form an educated opinion on (here in the States, anyway, ) because everything available here is SO biased in either direction that it is useless to look to the books for anything other than a "fun" crime read. Are you familiar with the charming Mrs. Rattenbury? Now THERE is a case which calls for a good book or two ,and which has potential for a remarkably sleazy movie. Likewise, Edith Thompson (which is relevant, sort of, as there was a ship angle to that one) and the American Hall-Mills case. So much interestingly weird history, so few books....

MR. WHITFIELD: When you said that Battlecrease House WAS a stone's throw away from your house, did you mean that it has been demolished, or that you have moved? I've been meaning to visit that site for quite a while, and hope that it hasn't been removed.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
5,342
34
208
James, you've got me on Mrs Rattenbury. Does not ring any bells whatsoever - what was her story?

Miss Borden is, of course, one of *the* characters in the pantheon of killers...I still remember the first time I saw the photos of the Fall River murder victims, and could see them now if I just shut my eyes. I must, however, look into this 'Smutty Nose' murderer. Did he keep his beak buried in porn or somesuch thing?

We did hang Captain Kidd just down the road a piece at Wapping...if you can even call him a pirate.
 
Nov 22, 2000
1,458
3
168
James, I'm afraid that "Battlecrease House" is now a block of luxury apartments - the house was demolished many years ago after being on the market for years. Although it was in an excellent position, it was not an attractive looking building.

Geoff
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,086
5
198
GEOFF- Thanks. Sorry to hear that, and I wish that I had known it was on the market. For any of us looking for some crime related real estate, the luxury home which replaced the former Sharon Tate house is on the market (relatively) cheap, as it turned out that demolishing the house did not halt the invasions of the disturbed and the morbid.
INGER: Mrs. Rattenbury was an attractive woman in early middle age, married to a much older man in an evidently sexless marriage. She began an affair with a teenaged staff member (who was "slow" and also a drug addict, but fairly good looking) which culminated in her husband being beaten to death by her lover, ca 1935. During the trial Mrs. Rattenbury, who was innocent of any doing in the murder, was pilloried in the press and forced to reveal intimate details of her sex life on the stand. Eventually the lover was sentenced to death, and a guilt ridden Mrs Rattenbury committed suicide by stabbing herself and jumping off of a bridge. There was a public campaign to save the lover, which was successful and his sentence was reduced. Eventually he was paroled,and the last I heard of him he was being held on charges of "improper" contact with a child, but that was some time ago and I'm not sure that he is still alive. I've omitted his name on the chance that he is. Altogether it was one of those stories that the tabloid press love, and I see it being adapted for screen as either an intelligent "prestige" project, or as a bit of sleaze, for it lends itself well to either.

Amazing how far we have drifted from either Coca-Cola or the Titanic, isn't it?
 
Apr 11, 2001
4,565
4
168
Well, actually, and just in case Phil is checking- I am CERTAIN all of these folks must have been Coca-cola drinkers-so we are relevant -sort of. I am writing a collection of Bloody Versicles based on famous murders, -Black Dahlia is one of my favorites. But back to ships- for Smith, Borden, Crippen and others try:
http://www.crimelibrary.com/classicstories.ht
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,086
5
198
Shelley: If you are a Black Dahlia buff, check out Childhood Shadows by Mary Pacios. She actually knew Beth Short and had access to her family and various friends and police officials who have never before been interviewed. Just as you are settling in and thinking "hey, this isn't bad at all" she goes and accuses old Orson Welles of being the killer- but up until that point it is really good. It is said that Beth Short drank Coke, and heaven knows it WAS one of the Titanic cases of the 1940s so this flirts with being relevant, doesn't it? What? It doesn't....oh well, sorry
 
Apr 11, 2001
4,565
4
168
Well- at one time Coca-Cola was a little of BOTH- but it is the beverage to which we refer! Remember that slogan- Things Go Better With Coke?!! The mind boggles....
 

Alan Hustak

Member
Jul 25, 2007
48
0
76
The Rattenenbury tale is classic - and has a Titanic connection. Rattenbury lived in Victoria, and designed the British Columbia legislature. He was invited by Charles Hays to design all of the new public buildings in Prince Rupert, which was to be the new terminus for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad. Rattenberry invested heavily in the area, and had extensive landholdings. When Hays drowned, the dream of a fortune in the B.C. died with it. Rattenbury lost a mint, met Alma, divorced his wife in Victoria, and in the ensuing scandal moved back to England. By then he was in his old age, and encourged his wife to take a younger lover. The young man, who was handsome but slow, got jealous when alma was affectionate to her husband, and "did him in," as we say.
 
Feb 14, 2011
2,447
3
68
Was cola/soda pop/fizzy drinks popular in 1912 as they are today? As far as i know, the popular colas in 1912 (which are still around today) were
*coca cola
*Pepsi
*Moxie

Was Dr. Pepper around in 1912?

I think sasperalla and root beer were one in the same, I could be wrong.....

I think there were several variations of ginger ale and ginger beer...

Which brand of colas were the bees knees in 1912? I'm guessing Moxie...
Which of these brands were served on Titanic?

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally a separate thread in a different topic, has been moved to this pre-existing thread addressing (at least at first) the same subject. MAB]
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,046
56
208
UK
No colas or other US brands of soft drink on the Titanic. WSL provided mineral waters, lemonade and ginger ale. For the latter you could choose Cantrell & Cochrane (the original) or Ross's 'Belfast Ginger Ale'.
 
May 27, 2007
3,916
3
0
Oddly enough, it appears not to have started life as a patent medicine.
That doesn't surprise me when in the late 19th century they had laudanum drops and reefer drops and a lot of stuff with cocaine the wonder drug. They had a bunch of stuff patented as medicine that they shouldn't have touched with a 10 foot pole.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,582
373
283
Easley South Carolina
>>They had a bunch of stuff patented as medicine that they shouldn't have touched with a 10 foot pole.<<

And some of that didn't even have questionable drugs in them. Just snake oil and about as effective. Dr. Pepper at least was never anything more then a sweet fizzy soft drink.