Coffee


Jan 6, 2005
276
6
113
Iowa, USA
Bob:

Any Briton who has not fallen for the charms of bergamot is missing something absolutely wonderful. Typhoo is available here; I admit to using it for iced tea, something that probably makes you lot shudder, but which is actually most soothing and cooling on very hot days, by which I mean temperatures warmer by ten or fifteen degrees Fahrenheit than the 82 or so degrees that make the Daily Mail go into headline frenzies about "killer heat waves." Tea bags are as useful for iced tea as they are abhorrent for tea time.

So far as referring to milk as "cream" is concerned, we don't do that either. Milk goes in tea, cream goes in coffee or over fruit or whatever.

I know habits and traditions are hard to break or change, but if I may make a suggestion, it might be very beneficial to give morning coffee a try. Later in the day, you'll enjoy your tea much more if you're awake while you're drinking it. ;-)
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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UK
Here, Sandy, are a couple of pics I took recently in Fortnum & Mason's on Picadilly, where each beverage has its own mahogany and marble counter. In accordance with British law coffee is sold only to Americans, who need to produce their passports as proof of nationality. Americans can buy tea if they so wish, but only after swearing an oath that they will not allow the sacred brew to come into contact with ice.

Piccadilly - Fortnum & Mason 4a.jpg Piccadilly - Fortnum & Mason 5a.jpg

Piccadilly - Fortnum & Mason 4a.jpg


Piccadilly - Fortnum & Mason 5a.jpg
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Anybody foolish enough to ask for instant coffee is of course taken out by the back door into Jermyn Street and shot.
 
Jan 6, 2005
276
6
113
Iowa, USA
Whatever happened to British fortitude? Just because you live on an island where it rains half the time doesn't mean you can't enjoy something cold once in a while! Here in Iowa *, it snows four months a year, and we chill every drop of beer we drink.

* Think of Iowa as a gigantic version of Lincs; it's two-thirds the size of the whole of Britain. The major industry here is growing sweetcorn - when it's not snowing.
 
Jan 6, 2005
276
6
113
Iowa, USA
Anyone foolish enough to drink instant coffee doesn't need to be shot - they've suffered enough.

*edit* Thanks for the lovely shots of Fortnum & Mason! I must give them a visit soon. Is that Captain Peacock behind the coffee counter?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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UK
We do enjoy something cold - ice cream! But to appreciate to the full the subtle flavour of a good beverage (alcoholic or otherwise) the temperature of said beverage must be neither too hot nor too cold.
 

RileyGardner17

Riley Gardner
Member
Jan 14, 2015
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2
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New Mexico, USA
To revive this thread, I'm curious about a few things I can't find information for:

1) What kind of coffee was brewed on the Titanic? What kind of roast? Were there different types of coffee one could order?
2) How would this have been served? Did you order it from a steward in the Reception Room (assuming this is after dinner) or from the waitstaff in the Dining Room with specific instructions to bring it to you? I'm assuming it was free as part of the ticket cost.
3) Was it served with cream and sugar or taken black? Even more so - cream and sugar in the morning and black coffee in the evening so as to add the liquor to it later?
4) Was there any difference in the coffee between the classes and the crew?
 

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