Collapse of the Titanic

May 7, 2005
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The Titanic is going to remain one of those things that never gets forgotten. Yet the collapse of her is inevitable. I hadn't really noticed much of a change until quite recently. After reading Charles Pellegrino's book, Ghosts of the Titanic, I was overcome with awe on the fact that the ship really has changed a lot since 1985. The Gymnasium roof is disintegrating and the E Deck gangway door that Lightoller left open is now on the seabed. In a recent National Geographic, there is a projected set of illustrations that portrays what will eventually happen to her. I really think that we need to get as much footage of the interiors and exteriors before she does depart us for a second time. If anybody has any comments, please post them I'll be happy to hear them.
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Cliff Johnson
 
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Jeffrey Beaudry

Guest
I too have read that National Geographic, and have also noticed the deterioration of the ship. It kind of makes me sad at the fact that we found her so late in her life. And as for losing her a second time, this time we can't get her back.
 
Aug 6, 2005
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I saw illustrations on the 'net on how she has changed over the years. As just about all of us know, in reality, Titanic is deteriorating each day (or rather, her corpse is. She died back in 1912, some believe). I wish we could change that and stop her from disappearing, but alas, it is impossible...

>>I really think that we need to get as much footage of the interiors and exteriors before she does depart us for a second time.<<

I second that. In time, she will disappear forever, so we need to get as many photos and videos as possible to keep her alive, even though these methods are only on paper or a television screen. We also have artifacts that have been brought up and will hopefully be publicly displayed for years to come in memory of her.

You can't forget artwork, of course. There are plenty of artists out there whom I have seen the works of that wonderfully depict Titanic as she was so many years ago, as well as the way she is in her watery grave today. Just another means of immortilizing the ship far past her existance that I thought I would bring up...
 
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Wayne Keen

Guest
I wonder what she really looked like right after she settled to the bottom...

Wayne
 
Aug 15, 2005
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I often think that... I found out (ish).
If you take a good look at Ken Marschall's wreck drawings and clean up the green stuff and rusticles with your mind's eye, you get a good image.
You need tons of imagination though, and it probably helps if you've taken LSD at some point in your life.
Regards, Ryan.
 

Adam Burgess

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Dec 10, 2006
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It would be very sad to see this great ship disapear for a second time i hope she at least makes it to the 100th aniversery (2012)
 
May 6, 2003
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I think I would have been cool if once they had finished flooding the dining room and reception room in James cameron's film, if they had sent a diver to film what those areas would have looked like right after she hit the bottom.
 

Rich Hayden

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Jul 17, 2014
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Strangely, one thing lacking in Titanic literature is a really good, detailed book on the wreck itself. There have been quite a number about specific expeditions but I usually find that half the space is taken up with long descriptions of the submersibles, the dives, etc. It's interesting but not really what I'm after. I particularly like Ballard's 'Discovery of the Titanic', which I'm rereading at the minute, and 'Ghosts of the Abyss' (and there's another Cameron one in which he groups all his expeditions into one book).


But I'm thinking of something more like 'Titanic: The Ship Magnificent' i.e. a big, reference book with detailed images and descriptions of the wreck, taking in ALL the expeditions from 1985 to 2012, including maps of the debris fields, reconstructions of how the numerous pieces of wreckage on the sea floor related to the ship itself and how it's deteriorated, views of all the parts of the wreck that have been explored, extensive photos of the artifacts that have been recovered, etc.

I find so many books on the wreck leave me wanting a whole lot more. There must be thousands of photos and hundreds of hours of video footage of the wreck that are sitting in archives and have never been been made public.
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
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Hi Rich,

Back in about 2003-ish, the "Titanic Commutator" magazine had a two part series where they published a heap of photos from Cameron's "Ghosts of the Abyss" expedition which didn't make it into the book or into the movie. They were really quite fascinating and, as you say, they're something which hopefully people will get to see more of as time goes on.

As for Titanic, last I heard she was still holding together - over 100 years down there, that's a pretty good effort! I'm not sure just how many more expeditions there will be though, given that the centenary has passed and it's going to get more and more difficult and dangerous to explore the wreck as she continues to decay.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Rich Hayden

Member
Jul 17, 2014
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Unfortunately I think you're right re. future expeditions. The centenary has gone and the Titanic seems to have drifted off the radar once again. I do worry though what will be waiting for us when a submersible does return. I would've loved to have had the remains of the Marconi equipment salvaged and brought back to the surface because I see it as being of such historical importance to the overall story. Who knows whether the Marconi room will even be accessible again. I can't help but think that every year that goes by with parts of the wreck unexplored is a missed opportunity.


I sometimes wonder what state the wreck is in 'right now' e.g. as I'm sat here typing this, which bits have fallen onto the ocean floor, whether the Gymnasium has continued its descent into the upper decks. It amazes me that the big centre anchor, the anchor chains and capstans on the foredeck haven't started to make their weight felt. Surely its only a matter of time before they too start to collapse downwards into the decks below.

It would be great to see more photos of the wreck especially more high quality mosaics like the National Geographic one of the Turkish Baths. Imagine seeing similar panoramic mosaics of the reception room on D deck and the remaining part of the 1st Class Dining Salon!
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
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Hi Rich,

Yes it is a shame, it's difficult to see what's on the horizon for the Titanic now that all the survivors are gone and the centenary has passed. There will always be interest but I hope it doesn't just fizzle out more and more with each generation.

There are a number of areas of the ship which explorers have tried to access but found that it was either too dangerous or impossible to get to - areas such as the stern included. James Cameron had the best shot with the little bots Jake and Elwood, but even they encountered their problems. Most of the marconi equipment would be attached to the walls I would have thought so trying to dislodge it would probably cause a heap more damage to the delicate wreck.

I thought I read somewhere that 'tourist' expeditions to the wreck were also being discontinued, so it does beg the question of "what's next" ?

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Apr 18, 2014
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I think her condition will deteriorate every single year.. The big role in it will have bacteria and fish. I sincerely hope no more artifacts are lifted from her, the attempts on lifting something out of her would contribute to her quick end, too. I recently saw a drawing of her by Ken Marshall,and was beyond words.. Majestic ship even as wreck. I am afraid many rich people would like to dive to her, but I´d rather let her rest in peace instead of permanent attention even in the " afterlife".
 
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Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
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The Titanic's wreck site is a grave, and should be treated as such. Inspecting the exterior is OK, but not landing submersibles on the wreck itself. So far, the explorations have been largely driven by profit motives. The most important discoveries of the wreck were determined by inspection of the exterior of the ship: the precise location of the wreck and that the ship split in two.

I think that most navies, certainly the U.S. Navy, lays legal claim to any of their sunken warships that are graves and that are ultimately located - and forbid any disturbance.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Up to this day RMST Inc. has done no profits from the wreck dives but lost again money.

By court they had to go to the wreck and recover artefacts.
It is not a grave site but a wreck side. What is the difference between Titanic and other ships such as the Lusitania? Is Titanic a grave site because we know and talk about her but Lusitania not?

And by the way, much had been learned from the interior exploration of the wreck.
 

Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
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USA
There are Indian burial mounds near where I live in Illinois, called the "Briscoe Mounds." Undoubtedly, in addition to skeletons, they contain various ancient artifacts.

The best preserved of a now rare earthwork are the two Briscoe burial mounds. Constructed approximately A.D. 100 to 1200 during the Mississippian Period, these mounds occupy a prominent overlook on the north side of the Des Plaines River valley, just west of the Interstate 55 crossing near Channahon. They are now owned by the State of Illinois.
The mounds are easy to visit and the site is open to the public, but there are signs that make it clear that any disturbing of the site is illegal. Even walking upon the mounds is forbidden out of common respect.