Collision breakup theory


Apr 8, 2008
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Question
Would the weight of the remaining portions of the reciprocating engines and the turbine enine cause the center of hravity to shift enough to allow a higher angle and length of the ship out of the water?
 

Kyle Naber

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I'm having a hard time understand the question. Are you proposing that the engines slid into the foward portion of the ship, allowing the stern to rise higher than currently estimated?
 
Dec 13, 2016
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I don't think any sliding of the engines occurred. They are still firmly planted where they were in 1912.
 
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Apr 8, 2008
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I'm having a hard time understand the question. Are you proposing that the engines slid into the foward portion of the ship, allowing the stern to rise higher than currently estimated?
No that isn't really the question. As known from the wreck the reciprocating engines are still in thier beds (except for the one low pressure cylinder). After the hull broke and before the stern finally sinking the ship's center of gravity looks lie it would have been aabout 2/3 of the way aft. When the forward section finally broke free the remaining portion of the stern would have had a new center of gravity. What I was thinking is would that allowed a steeper angle than the 20ish % further forward than what is presented in the current sinking scenarios?
 
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Kyle Naber

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It all depends on when the keel finally gave way. If the two halves had seporated while the stern were on an even keel, the stern wouldn't have actually risen a second time as described by Charles Joughin. This scenario is presented in the 2013 History Channel documentary and simulation:

(2:02)

However, some said that the stern seemed to stop in the air at an angle of about 60 degrees after the break. This could have not been possible if the keel had not dragged the stern back up. To me, this indicates that after the ship broke apart and settled back, the still attached double bottom was able to pull the stern high up out of the water and detach suddenly with the stern high up in the air. This would greatly slow the flooding process, giving some the impression that the ship stopped in the air, motionless. This scenario is presented in Titanic: Honor and Glory's real time sinking video:

(2:48:57)
 

Kyle Naber

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What do you mean by "keel?"

-- David G. Brown
IMG_7371.JPG
 
Dec 13, 2016
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Its hard to say. Some testified that as soon as the stern settled back, she keeled over and immediately sank. Sometimes in recollection, one can remember an event in slow motion and taking longer than it actually took.
 
Apr 8, 2008
57
7
48
It all depends on when the keel finally gave way. If the two halves had seporated while the stern were on an even keel, the stern wouldn't have actually risen a second time as described by Charles Joughin. This scenario is presented in the 2013 History Channel documentary and simulation:

(2:02)

However, some said that the stern seemed to stop in the air at an angle of about 60 degrees after the break. This could have not been possible if the keel had not dragged the stern back up. To me, this indicates that after the ship broke apart and settled back, the still attached double bottom was able to pull the stern high up out of the water and detach suddenly with the stern high up in the air. This would greatly slow the flooding process, giving some the impression that the ship stopped in the air, motionless. This scenario is presented in Titanic: Honor and Glory's real time sinking video:

(2:48:57)
I havn't seen it yet more after Ihave watched it.
 

Kyle Naber

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I think the question is referring to the angle in which the stern took on after the break and if the new center of rotation and the heavy engines may have altered it.
 
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I think that this actually should have been in the breakup forum. Before the break entire ship listing to port. She starts sinking faster hull plates start shearing off? Decks pull apart and break tank top between engine room and boiler room #1 breaks and bow starts to the bottom. remaining engine rooms pull stern sharply down ship is still rolling to port. Props and rudder rise up. New waterline about or near funnel #4. Stern rapidly sinks from here. I'm no expert so just guessing, I do have a rather hard time with any witness not in a boat though. When you are struggling just to stay alive your entire perception of what is going on is likely not going to be what is actually happening. Thanks for speculating with me.
 

Chris cameron

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Jul 4, 2016
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Correct me if I am wrong, i'm having trouble understanding your post.Basically you are saying you believe the angle of the stern was higher when more of the ship was still above the surface, as opposed to the suggested angle increase shortly before going under?
 

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