Color Photos of Berengaria and Leviathan


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Brent Holt

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From what I understand, the first commercially available color film was released in 1935. Although it was very expensive, I find it surprising that I have never seen an actual color image of Berengaria and Leviathan. Both ships went to the breakers in 1938, although the Levi had been out of service since 1934.
Brent
 

Eric Sauder

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Nov 12, 2000
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Hi, Brent:

Although I've never seen a color photo either Berengaria or Leviathan, color photos do exist from the late 1930s showing four old German liners (the four-funneled Kaiser Wilhelm II and Kronprinzessin Cecilie as well as the George Washington and the America) during their layup off Solomon's Island in the Patuxent River about halfway between Washington, DC, and Baltimore. They were supposed to be published a few years ago in a reprint of "Majesty at Sea," but so far nothing has come of the project.

Eric Sauder
 

Brent Holt

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I have a used copy of Majesty at Sea that should arrive in the mail sometime in the next week or so. I gave up waiting on a reprint. I am very much looking forward to finally getting a copy!
I also recently got a copy of Normandie: Her Life and Times. I highly recommend that one as well.
(I also have an old copy of Damned by Destiny on order)
Brent
 

Eric Sauder

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That's one I haven't seen before, but it's a stunning shot. A lot of the ones I mentioned earlier were taken on board.

Eric Sauder
 

Jim Kalafus

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This is kind of on topic- there is a good painting of the laid-up ex Germans, in the September 1937 issue of Fortune Magazine, which was a special issue devoted to the US Merchant Marine. Also in that issue is a photo portfolio taken aboard the decaying Leviathan (exteriors and interiors) by Margaret Bourke-White; dozens of separate liner photographs, and a REALLY snotty, elitist, anti-Semetic article about a six day cruise to Havana aboard the Oriente (sister ship to the Morro Castle) which shows how much we have evolved as a society since 1937. There is a Fortune issue from the summer of 1930 with a photo essay taken aboard the in-service Leviathan which makes for a depressing contrast when viewed in juxtaposition with the 1937 shots. If you can find them, there are great issues from 1932,'33 '35 and '36 profiling the Bremen; Italian Line; French Line; Normandie (twice) and Queen Mary which, in addition to the articles, sport the most lavish liner advertising of the pre-war era; the May 1935 fold-out ad for the Rex being perhaps the nicest of the lot.
 
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