Comparison of the Three PAs


David Paris

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Mar 27, 2008
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Mark - this fact is well known from interviews with the cast over the years and is documented on imdb. They had some falling out and refused to speak to each other when the cameras weren't rolling. According to Carol they made up years later.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>if I recall correctly, in the book the Martin character had a shipboard fling with a "spinster" about his age,

AHHHHHHHH!!!! NOOO!!!!!

Read a bit back up the thread, Will
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Martin, in the book is a dried up man who hasn't had sex in 15 years due to a wife crippled with arthritis.

Wilma Lewis is a 'randy blonde widow' from Lake Shore Drive in Chicago. Beautiful, and with large breasts. She has taken the cruise ONLY for cheap sex. Every eligible bachelor on the ship comes knockin' but she'll have none of that...."with unerring instinct" she realises that under the grey, wizened and probably urine-scented exterior of James Martin lives the soul of a porn star...so she invites him to a party-there are no other guests- and soon they have done everything sexual a couple can legally do. SO ADDICTIVE is James Martin's brand of lust, that Mrs. Lewis wants to set him up in Chicago as sort of a kept man....but he has a wife darn it.

So remarkably true to life...

So, as bad as Nonnie and Martin are on film, it could be a lot worse. The idea of an aroused Red Buttons capering with a busty blonde 40-something widow is downright sickmaking.

Reverend Scott, however, MAY have been having sex with a bony old spinster. Now, how's THAT for a plot twist?

>Thank goodness it was cut out!

Actually, I rather LIKE the extended dialogue simply because Nonnie, in the film, comes across as retarded, to use the appropriate 1972 terminology, and HAS no lines that aren't simpering, idiotic, or simpering AND idiotic. At least the deleted lines showed she was capable of coherent thought.

Jumping back to 1982. The initial video release of the film was of abysmal quality by later standards. One of the more fun aspects of which was that "brother Teddy's" dark blue top blended perfectly into the black background making it looks as if Nonnie is toting around his severed head. We used to toss additional dialogue at the screen during that segment:

Martin: Nonnie....your brother is dead.
Nonnie shakes head 'no.'
Martin: The rest of him is over there.

Later, better, transfers, and the DVD revolution, ruined that sight gag.
 

Jim Kalafus

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In The Hollywood Kids column, Carol Lynley also revealed that relations between Ms Winters and Mr Borgnine became so...strained....that an SAG rep had to be on set at all times after Ernest blew up at Shelley and she filed a grievance.
 

John Clifford

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Director Ronald Neams (I think I spelled his name right) noted that every day one of the actors had an issue to be settled. He said the one exception was Eric Shea.
For Mr. Neams, that meant that he was always dealing with egos and personality issues, even if the parties could or would reconcile later on.

The one thing he said that struck me as funny was, in June 2002:"It was a wonder that my good friend, Shelley Winters did not drown while trying to talk underwater". He also noted that she had to be reminded that only the Director is allowed to yell "Cut!!".

Thus, it is the issue with many a film: everything looks great in the film, and you enjoy seeing the performers together. Then you learn that there was sometimes disputes and bickering on the set.

The most famous example of that was with "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?", as Bette Davis and Joan Crawford despised each other.
Also noted: William Frawley and Vivian Vance did not get along during the run of "I Love Lucy".

And we can all find other instances if we research the issue.
 

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