Complete cast list of A Night to Remember

Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
I'd have to agree with Tracy on this one. The crucial events happened over only a very few hours, but the fallout has spanned two inquiries and 90 years of ferocious debate.

How do you do justice to that in a single flick?
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
A Night To Remember isn't a terribly long movie, but the supporting role of the Californian figures very prominently throughout. I guess the final call is the director or the producer's to make. We've had the doomed romance (Titanic 97) and the dysfunctional family in crisis approach (Titanic 53) and even the Nazi approach. Yet, the Californian is still no where in sight. That still makes no sense.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
It may well have been that the producers simply didn't want to deal with it. Eventually, somebody will make another movie on the subject. How they deal with the Californian is anybody's guess, but no matter which "side" it favours, you can bet it'll have little to do with reality.

Movies made for entertainment aren't exactly renowned for historical accuracy!
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Ok, I'll concur with that idea Michael, but even the Titanic documentaries barely scratch the surface of the Californian controversey. Why was Captain Stanley Lord so disinterested in the reports from Stone about rockets in the night? Something just wasn't kosher aboard the Californina that night, that's for sure.
 
Tracy Smith

Tracy Smith

Member
Sharon, please send me an email. I tried to send you an email by clicking on your name, but it said my message was too long and refused to send it. I will send my message in a return email to you.
 
Tracy Smith

Tracy Smith

Member
PS, Click on my name to get my email address. Thanks.
Happy
 
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Eric Paddon

Member
What I do find interesting is that any cinematic depiction of the Californian incident ultimately serves to underscore the fact that it is impossible for the Lordite view of absolving Captain Lord to be depicted for the simple reason that the Lordite view reduced to its bottom line, makes no logical sense.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Sharon, the latest documentaries I've seen not don't just barely touch on, they almost totally ignor it.

Why?

I can only guess at it for some, but for some of the Discovery documetaries, the focus was primarily technical/forensics or dealing with matters of exploration and artifact recovery. The Californian is irrelevant to that, so the producers simply ignor it.

IMO, no cinimatic portrayal of the Californian Incident will ever be able to do it any sort of justice no matter what side they take or even no side at all.

A documentary might, but only if they try to present everything pro or con, (Hopefully in context!) and simply let the chips fall where they may. Don't get your hopes up though. There's too much emotional baggage attatched to the whole thing that won't go away.
 
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Adam McGuirk

Member
I think if you include the Californian in a movie you need to depict 3 things which we know what happened because it was documented from testimoney.
1) Gibson and Stone saw Titanics rockets
2)Captain Lord was notified
3) The neccessary actions of waking up the radio operator were not taken.

I am not gonna speculate on live that could have been saved but if one live could have been saved by Californian than they should have come and saved that one live.
Adam
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
1) Gibson and Stone saw Titanics rockets. Yes they did.

2)Captain Lord was notified. Half an hour later

3) The neccessary actions of waking up the radio operator were not taken. The neccessary action would have been to get underway and to move towards the source of the rockets to see what was going on. Getting on the wireless can be seen as useful in hindsight, but only because we know Titanic had wireless. The only thing the Californian knew was that a steamer out there was firing rockets for some reason. They did not know whether she had wireless, and they knew that a lot of ships didn't.

Now here's where it get's tricky. Since the position arrived at by Boxhall is know to be wrong by 14 miles, what course do you set when you get this information (Which we know to be bogus, but which they couldn't have known then.) Do you;

a)Go for the position given by the navigator of a crack liner or
b)Trust your instincts and eyes and go for the rockets?

On this, we can only guess.
 
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Adam McGuirk

Member
"The neccessary action would have been to get underway and to move towards the source of the rockets to see what was going on. Getting on the wireless can be seen as useful in hindsight, but only because we know Titanic had wireless. The only thing the Californian knew was that a steamer out there was firing rockets for some reason. They did not know whether she had wireless, and they knew that a lot of ships didn't."

Thats true Michael. Buit IMO, they shoul have got on wireless while they did that to see exactly what the problem was.
 
Michael Shetina

Michael Shetina

Member
I have a ANTR question, does anyone know who played Edith Evans in the film, I regularly contribute to IMBD and would like to add that.
 
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Eric Paddon

Member
"The only thing the Californian knew was that a steamer out there was firing rockets for some reason. They did not know whether she had wireless, and they knew that a lot of ships didn't."

Not waking the wireless operator because they assumed the ship didn't have wireless is the ultimate example of the definition of ass-u-me.
 
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Adam McGuirk

Member
Yes Michael, if you didn't know the ship had wireless well, you could have just gotten on your wireless and I bet you would have found out pretty quickly. I think people try to make Californian look better.
Adam
 
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Don Tweed

Member
Let's say the Californian did not have wireless for the moment.
If this were the case, then the Californians'first reaction should have been to make their way towards the rockets by sight alone.
But, since she did have wireless, Lord failed at the first and second opportunity to come to the rescue of fellow mariners and passengers.
Robert Ballard once said that:"I would always hope that that fellow mariner would come to my aid if need be", and Lord, a man of many years at see, should have felt that also.
The one true thing you have to give credit to Cptn. Lord for doing is stopping his ship when he knew of the dangers around him.
To bad Titanic did not heed these same warnings.
Just my opinion, Don
 
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