Condition of Wreck


Robert Berg

Member
Jan 2, 2005
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I recently re-read Dr. Ballards book on his expediton to the Lusitania. It describes how the superstructure has slid off towards the bottom, and that the hull has compressed to about half its original width. It made me wonder if it would be possible for any exploration inside, to see the first class dining room or any other rooms (similar to Ghosts of the Abyss) Other than his book, I've never read/heard anything else on diving to the wreck. Any thoughts, ideas or comments?
 
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Jon Meadows

Guest
Judging by the description and the photos, I would think that any openings are too small for entry. But, is there much to see inside? Compressing to half it's width has probably destroyed anything recognizeable.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Even more interesting is his hiring Odyssey Marine to work with him on this. Regarding the order of the court, he has clearance to film and to move things to gain access to the wreck, but not to recover.

From a scientific standpoint, I have to confess that his setting out to "prove" something he assumes happened makes me a bit uneasy about his credibility. If he had said something along the lines of "We mean to either verify or falsify [insert hypothosis here]." I'd be a lot more confident.
 

Tom McLeod

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Sep 1, 2005
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Referring to Ballard's original Lusitania book and also his Lost Liners book, there is a picture showing that some wooden decking still in place as well as sections of coiled rope on the wreck. Which may give some hope to other good states of preservation in the wreck, as well as below decks. I would love to see more such work done for Britannic or Carpathia. The polarizing problem is the line between salvage and exploration.
 
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Jeff Brebner

Guest
"From a scientific standpoint, I have to confess that his setting out to "prove" something he assumes happened makes me a bit uneasy about his credibility. If he had said something along the lines of "We mean to either verify or falsify [insert hypothosis here]." I'd be a lot more confident."

Exactly - he's not looking for evidence of what happened - he's looking for evidence of what he thinks happened.

I doubt he finds anything conlusive. Even if evidence has survived all these decades submerged, the wreck is likely laying (and collapsing) atop it.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>I doubt he finds anything conlusive.<<

The risk here is that if the man assumes and sets out to prove the premise, the conclusions will be seen...rightly so...as unreliable. Worse, he may well miss evidence pointing to what really happened. Real science doesn't seek to "prove" a preconcieved notion. What it does is seek to verify or falsify a premise and leave itself open to new possibilities that may never have occured to anybody.
 
May 3, 2002
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Misgivings aside, It is still great that extensive exploration and photography will take place.

I would like to see a good photo mosaic done to eaual Ken's painting. Also ROVs sent into anywhre possible, real cutting edge exploration to get the most information out of this wreck before it becomes impossible. And hopefully a publicaion of all findings? [if Mr Bemis reads this.]

thanks

Martin
 

Tom McLeod

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Sep 1, 2005
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The three of you all have great points. Michael and Jeff I think have nailed the "intent" of the dive right on! You have to go based on knowledge, but open minded to examine what you are seeing for what it is. I'm also with Martin on wanting to see more shots of the wreck, as has been the case with other liners and the technology that is out there to give us a great view of these lost ships. With any lost liner resting in the deep, exploration can lead to further destruction. I'd love to see more of the "Lucy" photographed and explored, but her sad state of preservation as is, makes me think maybe she has endured enough "probing."
 

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