Continuous Titanic Story Use Your Imaginations


Status
Not open for further replies.

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
Upon turning around, the rising waves were gushing along the starboard side, finally sweeping away the crew working at the last starboard lifeboat.

“Noooooooooo!” I screamed, unconscious as to the happenings around me. A funnel cracked under the pressure as the Titanic tilted at an ever-increasing angle, and collapsed near the spot where many of the crew had been swept. Just then, another billowing wave swept all the people along my area into the water.

The pressure of the water was immense, but the pressure on my mind was even greater. Without knowing what had come over me, I began swimming in the direction of the first wave. Along the way, I saw junior Marconi officer Harold Bride, and gave him a push on the back as he spat out sea water. There were so many passengers who had jumped into the water in desperation, but I knew that it was a foolish decision — the water was freezing cold. I felt numbed by the coldness, but continued swimming. I knew that it was the only way I could hope to avoid dying of hypothermia.

Despite searching around desperately, I was unable to find Mr. Murdoch. A woman told me, “Save your strength, child,” but I refused to stop. I just had to know if my brave officer was still alive…

It seemed as though the search would never end — firstly for my parents, secondly for Mr. Murdoch. I do not know how long I searched for; time did not have meaning or value to me. The Titanic gradually bent further and further, finally going straight down upon reaching a right angle. The screams of more than a thousand people who fell, slipped, slid down, unable to prevent gravity from acting upon them simply overwhelmed the ocean; the whirlpool that relentlessly sucked both ship and bodied down grew wider and hungrier…

There is such a trance that death holds on you that makes you unwilling to believe that it is coming. I was just at the edge of the whirlpool, about to be sucked in without realizing it, when I glimpsed Mr. Murdoch’s body balanced precariously on a wooden plank, about to fall any moment.

I just swam and swam and swam away from the finally contented whirlpool, reaching his body just as the ripples of the diminishing whirlpool were about to upset the equilibrium and cause Mr. Murdoch’s body to topple into the *nothingness* of the ocean.

I pulled Mr. Murdoch’s hand up; its iciness stung me from head to toe, but I simply refused to let go. Deep down in my heart, I knew that he was dead, but all that time I treated him as though he was merely unconscious.

~~~

My name is Charmaine Sia. I have mentioned that before, I believe? It does not matter; what matters is the name of the man lying beside me. William Murdoch, First Officer of the R.M.S. Titanic.

I do not know how long I have waited for the lifeboats to return. I know there is more than enough space for a hundred, two hundred people.

I doubt the lifeboats will return. I doubt there will be anyone still alive if they return. I have waited for a quarter of eternity, but I am not waiting for death!!!

I tell myself that I must survive because Mr. Murdoch gave his lifejacket away to me. If he had not done so, he would probably still be alive now, like the other officers whom I know managed to survive — I saw their lifeboat leaving.

I tell myself that I must survive to make sure that Mr. Murdoch’s body does not topple from the plank to the bottom of the ocean (I have been constantly steadying it for the last “quarter of eternity”), that he gets a proper burial fitting of a hero, that the name and reputation of an honorable and respectable seaman is not marred by skepticism about how he died.

I have waited for a quarter of eternity. Lifeboat 7, that half-full lifeboat will not return; lifeboat 1, the disgrace of all lifeboats which left with only a dozen people on board will not return either. I fear that death is the only thing waiting for me.

I feel the hypothermia inching its way along my body. I do not know if I will die in thirty, three hundred, three thousand seconds…

Somehow the hand that I have not stopped clasping for the past “quarter of eternity” feels warm; the body I have constantly eased up onto the wooden plank seems alive once again…

…and at the back of my mind, I remember a song I heard a long time ago in my dreams.

“The ship of dreams, the ship of dreams,
I was once an officer on the ship of dreams…”
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,668
881
563
Easley South Carolina
G'Day Charmaine, and thanks. I still have to finish it though. It's been one helluva past two weeks. The bright spot is I'll be on holiday next week so I can get this little project done.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
N.B. My character's not dead at the last part of my story, she just becomes drowsy after holding on for so long...and the rest can be predicted.
sad.gif
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
Hope you weren't writing anything that I happened to contradict, Michael...I'd feel really bad if that was the case!

happy.gif
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
I added in the bold and italic codes, as well as made a few changes to make the storyline smoother. Hope you all enjoy this edited version!
happy.gif
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
The Ship of Dreams

My name is Charmaine Sia, but that does not matter. Nothing matters except human life when a ship is going down. Nothing matters to me except the knowledge that my death will be no worse than that of the man I admire…

~~~​

I had never been interested in the grandness and elegance of the Titanic from the beginning, or the fame and fortune of the first class passengers. Instead, I spent each day at the deck watching the officers at the bridge, looking down at them; the cool, composed way they carried out their orders. I felt as though the blood of the sea was in me, spurring me on to watch these men, forgotten by most of the passengers, doing their work with pride and responsibility. My parents did not mind me staying at the deck, because according to them, I was an adolescent, not a child nor an adult, who could not be controlled and would just bother them anyway.

It was hard trying to get to know their names and their character when I stood, it seemed to me, so far away from them. Yet the shouting of orders made my task easier, and before the end of two days I knew the names of all the officers. Smith…Lightoller, Boxhall, Moody…and of course that man whom I came to admire so much, First Officer Murdoch. William Murdoch. I savoured the name as it came to my lips.

I still do not know why I took a liking to him above all the other officers. Maybe it was the calm and simple way he went about his duties…or maybe that he was the first officer whom I saw on duty. I spent a lot of my time admiring him at the bridge, since there was nothing else which I felt sufficiently interested in to go about doing.

Yet I never summoned up the courage to go to the bridge and really get to know those officers. I remember seeing a man at the bridge wing looking out to sea. He was there for about half an hour, before Mr. Murdoch came out and took him in. I felt a pang of jealousy at that time, because I so wished that it had been me. I just stared and stared…and somehow my focus shifted to the calm ocean. Calm was not the right word to use to describe it; it was far more than just calm. Eerie, actually. For a moment the strangest thought came to me that if I died, I wanted to be cremated and have my ashes sprinkled over this calm ocean.

Day after day, just watching the officers, or watching the passengers at times if I became bored. I remember seeing a well-dressed woman hounded mercilessly by the ship's designer after making a comment about the furnishings. I remember seeing as the designer was hounded and questioned mercilessly by this man with a beard and a ponytail for some unknown reason. There was also a rather large “rat” that I thought looked totally ridiculous, but was too polite to comment about. Dear me, a “rat” respectfully greeting passengers and shaking hands with them! I wondered how many of those passengers actually cared about anything or anyone else other than themselves. Maybe it was just the effect of seeing too many first-class passengers walking about as though the deck belonged to them…

Otherwise, my mind would be off to some calculations. 22.5 knots, I had heard that Captain Smith intended to move up to that speed. There would be quite a couple of changes to the course as iceberg warnings came in, I knew, but I calculated that perhaps, just perhaps, the Titanic might be able to reach New York sooner than expected. I did not know whether to be happy or sad — that the Titanic would be able to move at such a quick speed, that my new life in America would be starting sooner than I thought; or that I would not be looking out at a ship’s officers for a long time more.

And of course the lifeboats. Something about the lifeboats had bothered me from the instant I had seen them in number and in size. However, the fact never really sank in until my calculations made me recoil in fear. There would not be enough lifeboats, not enough for at least half the total number of passengers. Even rough estimates told me that there was space for only a thousand people at most.

My days were like that — normal, by my own expectations, until the day Mr. Murdoch looked up, saw me for a moment and lighted up my life.

At that time, I did not know whether it was just an act that meant nothing to him, or whether he had done it specially for me. After his morning shift ended on the final day when the ship hit the iceberg, he looked up at the deck, saw me and gave me a wide smile that made me feel appreciated. At that moment, I knew that it was worth it not being inside with all the passengers.

He waved to me, and I fancied that I saw his mouth say, “Wait up there, all right?” He did not need to say that in the first place; I would have stayed at the deck the entire day anyway. A few moments later, Mr. Murdoch passed by me on the way to the crew’s quarters.

“You’ve been standing here everyday…you seem to like watching us at the bridge, huh?” he said. His sparkling eyes seemed to twinkle and say, “You’ll be a good officer!”

For a moment I stood amazed, my mouth open, that he had actually noticed me! “Yes, you noticed?” I finally ventured softly.

“I notice little things,” he said with a smile, “I have to go now — help out with other duties.”

That was all of the conversation that I had with Mr. Murdoch, but it really touched me that he had noticed a girl standing on the deck when there were so many other famous passengers around…John Jacob Astor, Colonel Gracie etc.

***​
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
It was a cold, bitter night, but I did not feel warm despite the thick blankets in my room. Then, I realised exactly what had been prodding me since morning. Mr. Murdoch had not been “on the way” to the crew’s quarters when he passed by me in the morning — he had specially come up to the deck to talk to me instead. All of a sudden, as I looked at the clock, it felt so important to be out there at the deck. 10 o’ clock — Mr. Murdoch’s shift, I remembered. And I had this feeling at the back of my mind that I might not be able to see Mr. Murdoch for one more night.

At that moment, I had not even entertained the thought of an iceberg hitting; all I had thought of was the great speed that the Titanic was moving at, and whether it might arrive early. When I rushed out to the deck, there was nothing in sight — and I mean nothing. The ocean was eerily calm, so still it resembled a piece of coloured blue paper. I stood at the deck the whole time, watching the officers, especially Mr. Murdoch, as they guided the Titanic through the ocean.

Time passes quickly when you do not want it to, and slowly when you want it to fly. I had totally lost track of the time — I think that I would well have stayed at the deck until Mr. Murdoch’s shift ended, when I thought I spied something at the horizon. As the ship continued forward at full speed, I knew that I had not seen wrongly. It was an iceberg. An iceberg. It seemed so small for a moment, keeping me in a trance as it gradually became bigger to my eyes.

Abruptly, I jerked my head up to see the lookouts. The ship was still firm on its course and had not changed its direction at all. Before I could help myself, I was running, dashing to the bridge…

The iceberg was looming in front of me even before I had even stepped onto the staircase leading to the bridge. I heard Mr. Murdoch yell out commands, but it was too late to prevent the tear-jerking sound that emerged seconds later.

***​
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
Confusion abounded aboard the Titanic in minutes, increasing exponentially by the second. First, there was utter disbelief and the word “unsinkable” being used over and over again…and then the crowds started thronging upon the realisation that the Titanic was made of iron. Because I had been at the deck and not in my room when the iceberg hit, I had somehow not been given a lifejacket by any of the crew.

It was heartbreaking watching as the lifeboats left without even being half-full. I remember the first lifeboat, Starboard boat 7 being launched half-empty; I remember seeing the pained expression on Mr. Murdoch’s face when no one else was willing to board the lifeboat, although he had clearly said, “Brides and grooms first,” in addition to the order of “Women and children first.” It tormented me even more because of the numbers I had worked out barely a few days ago.

The terror went on…I do not want to describe it. There is a certain limit on the horror that a person can speak of after seeing scenes of fighting, pushing, death; that was exactly what I saw. But I remember clearly the incident that broke my heart. If I had gone on a lifeboat I would never have seen it, but that was not the case.

Lifeboat 1 left with twelve people on board. No doubt it was a smaller lifeboat, but the lifeboat was barely a quarter full! There were so few people on board that I distinctly counted twelve!!! And there was a man coolly asking Mr. Murdoch, “May I get in?”

I felt like running to push that man into the lifeboat and make him shut up.

“Yes, I wish you would,” Mr. Murdoch said. I think he really was going to push that passenger in, but the passenger slipped and fell into the lifeboat by accident, causing Mr. Murdoch to laugh and say, “That’s the funniest sight I have seen today!”

That was not surprising. It was after all a new day, no longer the night of yesterday. And all that today had seen was the terror of the Titanic sinking.

I was running around the Titanic in despair looking for my parents. I did not know if they had already left without me, or whether they were trapped in some corner of the ship. I felt so hopeless being unable to help while the crew seemed to be going around doing their best for the passengers, and in the sprawl of confusion I accidentally knocked into Mr. Murdoch while he was helping to load a lifeboat.

“It’s you! What…what are you doing here without a lifejacket?” he looked around desperately for a crew member holding lifejackets while muttering partly to himself. Seeing none, he took off his coat while I watched, puzzled, and…

…he took off his lifejacket and pushed it into my hands. I stood stiff, unable to comprehend this act, until I saw 2 gun bullets roll out of his coat pocket and slide madly down the deck, disappearing out of sight. The ship was sinking. Fast. And Mr. Murdoch had given me his lifejacket…

“God bless you, Mr. Murdoch,” I gushed out.

“And you. Goodbye, good luck!” he said, before turning back to work on the lifeboat.

I felt a hot tear dripping down my cheek uncontrollably. I hurriedly wore the lifejacket on while continuing to search for my parents. Just as I felt totally exhausted and about to give up for good, I saw them boarding the other lifeboat, but they had not seen me yet. I was running towards them, about to shout, “Mum! Dad!”, when I stopped abruptly. I looked back at Mr. Murdoch, looked down at the rising waters, looked at the two lifeboats left…and I could not, just could not do it.

I stayed on the ship while their lifeboat left.

***​
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
Upon turning around, the rising waves were gushing along the starboard side, finally sweeping away the crew working at the last starboard lifeboat.

“Noooooooooo!” I screamed, unconscious as to the happenings around me. A funnel cracked under the pressure as the Titanic tilted at an ever-increasing angle, and collapsed near the spot where many of the crew had been swept. Just then, another billowing wave swept all the people along my area into the water.

The pressure of the water was immense, but the pressure on my mind was even greater. Without knowing what had come over me, I began swimming in the direction of the first wave. Along the way, I saw junior Marconi officer Harold Bride, and gave him a push on the back as he spat out sea water. There were so many passengers who had jumped into the water in desperation, but I knew that it was a foolish decision — the water was freezing cold. I felt numbed by the coldness, but continued swimming. I knew that it was the only way I could hope to avoid dying of hypothermia.

Despite searching around desperately, I was unable to find Mr. Murdoch. A woman told me, “Save your strength, child,” but I refused to stop. I just had to know if my brave officer was still alive…

It seemed as though the search would never end — firstly for my parents, secondly for Mr. Murdoch. I do not know how long I searched for; time did not have meaning or value to me. The Titanic gradually bent further and further, finally going straight down upon reaching a right angle. The screams of more than a thousand people who fell, slipped, slid down, unable to prevent gravity from acting upon them simply overwhelmed the ocean; the whirlpool that relentlessly sucked both ship and bodies down grew wider and hungrier…

There is such a trance that death holds on you that makes you unwilling to believe that it is coming. I was just at the edge of the whirlpool, about to be sucked in without realising it, when I glimpsed Mr. Murdoch’s body balanced precariously on a wooden plank, about to fall any moment.

I just swam and swam and swam away from the finally contented whirlpool, reaching his body just as the ripples of the diminishing whirlpool were about to upset the equilibrium and cause Mr. Murdoch’s body to topple into the nothingness of the ocean.

I pulled Mr. Murdoch’s hand up; its iciness stung me from head to toe, but I simply refused to let go. Deep down in my heart, I knew that he was dead from the impact of the collapsed funnel, but all that time I treated him as though he was merely unconscious.

~~~​
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
My name is Charmaine Sia. I have mentioned that before, I believe? It does not matter; what matters is the name of the man lying beside me. William Murdoch, First Officer of the R.M.S. Titanic.

I do not know how long I have waited for the lifeboats to return. I know there is more than enough space for a hundred, two hundred people.

I doubt the lifeboats will return. I doubt there will be anyone still alive if they return. I have waited for a quarter of eternity, but I am not waiting for death!!!

I tell myself that I must survive because Mr. Murdoch gave his lifejacket away to me. If he had not done so, he would probably still be alive now, like the other officers whom I know managed to survive — I saw their lifeboat leaving.

I tell myself that I must survive to make sure that Mr. Murdoch’s body, which I have constantly been steadying for the last quarter of eternity, does not topple from the plank to the bottom of the ocean; that he gets a proper burial fitting of a hero; that the name and reputation of an honourable and respectable seaman is not marred by scepticism about the way he died.

I have waited for a quarter of eternity. Lifeboat 7, that half-full lifeboat will not return; lifeboat 1, the disgrace of all lifeboats, which left with only a dozen people on board, will not return either. I fear that death is the only thing waiting for me.

I feel the hypothermia inching its way along my body. I do not know if I will die in thirty, three hundred, three thousand seconds…

Somehow the hand that I have not stopped clasping for the past quarter of eternity feels warm; the body I have constantly eased up onto the wooden plank seems alive once again…

…and at the back of my mind, I remember a song I heard a long time ago in my dreams.

“The ship of dreams, the ship of dreams,
I was once an officer on the ship of dreams…”
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
>...and then I put on my huge Minnie Mouse suit. I might stand out, but no one would have a clue who I was.....

I'm sorry to burst your bubble, but Mickey Mouse was only invented in 1928, so there was no way Minnie Mouse could be around before that. ;) I guess Mike was right about it being a rat...
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,668
881
563
Easley South Carolina
Ships always die a noisy death. The Titanic's end was fairly sedate compared to others that both Mike and Teri had witnessed...up until the last few minutes...stresses and strains were at work that would tear the ship apart.

Both had been breifed by Roy Mengot about what to expect in a general sense, and what they saw for the most part had been pretty faithful to the historical record. For most of the episode, the bow had gone down slowly, her own boyancy resisting the weight that was pouring in up forward. But the balance could only hold up for so long befor weight won out, and it won out in more ways then one.

The forward six compartments had flooded fairly rapidly with the initial influx of water coming in at up to seven tons per second until the hull reached a state of near equilibrium. However, the watertight bulkheads didn't go up far enough, and the end result was that water flowed up through hatches, companionways, wireways,tubes, plumbing and vents to flow foward at first, then slowly back aft as the dry sections forward flooded solid.

It was a trickle at first, but as the weight piled on, the trickle became a torrent as water flowed back along passageways, and through non-tight doors and fittings, then down hatches into the boiler rooms and anything else below. As the bow went down, the stern went up, and the ships mass began to work against her. A ship's structure is designed to be supported in part by the waters in which she floats. With the support deminishing as the stern reared up, more and more weight was being supported by the structure itself. Both Mike and Teri remembered the Gibbs and Cox Finite element analysis of thestresses involved, and it demonstrated that the worst of it was taken up by the keel and the two expansion joints, with the very worst of it being located along the keel, thestructure coming up from it and the second expansion joint.

The practical reality was all too easy to see. The first graphic indicator came when they heard noises like gunshots. These were the cables which supported the number one stack giving up the ghost as the forward area plunged. This was followed by a mournful groan as the stack toppled forward and slightly to starboard, slowly at first, then more quickly until it slapped into the water.

From where he was on the stern, Mike wasn't in the best of all positions to see it, but he did see the stack land on swimmers who had been swept off the decks. It barely missed one of the nearby collapsibles which was bobbing about and which a few people had managed to climb aboard. Something he was in a position to notice were some of the rails which seemed to buckle befor breaking and some of the hull plates which appeared to be distorting themselves.

One thing the history books could never convey was the ghastly noise of terrified people who were screaming in a near full panic. Nobody stood on the stern calmly singing a hymn as the ship went down, the popular legends notwithstanding. What Mike saw was a mad rush to the stern by a frightened mob hoping to delay the inevitable by even a few minutes. The screams that both Mike and Teri heard would haunt them both for the rest of their lives. He made it back ahead of most all of them and took up a position by the flagstaff. His plan was to hold on when the ship broke up, then climb over the rail afterwards.

For the life of him, he couldn't see the Irishman whom he'd seen earlier. His guess was that the man was lost in the crowd somewhere. In the collapsible that Teri was riding, she saw Ismay look down and sqeeeze his eyes shut. The way he was shaking, it was clear that the man was fighting a breakdown.

Sensor data would confirm that it was the keel that gave way first, literally bending over and in on itself. It was gradual at first, but the warning sign of what was to come was unmistakeable. The lights flickered out, came back on for a minute, then went out entirely as wires, condiuts and connections were severed, plunging the ship into near total darkness.

The stress on the keel was relived when it gave out, but the problem was that this same stress was transferred up into the sides of the ship right along it's weakest areas. That huge first class dining room...such a lovely wide open space...couldn't support it and it was there as well along the upper works that the collapse began. The sides tearing away, the upper decks caving in, and along with it, there was the tremendous din of anything not bolted or nailed down surging and sliding forward. Tables, chairs, dishes, bookshelves, any loose equipment, the boilers and the engines being unseated at the break, and from Mike's point of view, it was if the section from the third stack to the forth and slightly beyond had collapsed like a house of cards.

more cables broke, and anything which broke away either felldown or shot out in all directions to splash into the area around the break. Several swimmers were killed at once by the debris that went flying. Considering the alternative of freezing to death, they were the lucky ones. Most would not be as fortunate.

The stern seemed to sag back to settle into the ocean, and it was at this point that Mike climbed over the rail for the ride down to the sea. His lifebelt was secure in place, his insulating undrrwear was in place, and all that he could do was go along for the ride. Glancing to his right, he noticed the ship's baker, Charles Joughin, hanging onto the rail as well. he had a slightly glazed look in his eyes, but it wasn't due to drunkeness. The man was quite reasonably terrified.

"Looks like this is it." Mike said to the man. he just nodded and said nothing. Once more the stern reared up, slowly until it reached an angle of about 16 degrees. All the while this was happening, anything loose in the ever widening gap tore away and fell into the sea. That included the boilers in Boiler Room one, and the remains of the forward section of the engines, both of which plunged to the bottom. There was a shudder as the sections seperated and then the stern began to fill up and settle.

With the Night vision enhancing glasses he had on, Mike could see the passengers and crew trapped on the ship being swept into the sea. What he was struck by was that there was so little foaming around the shattered reamins of the hull, and the ride going in was much like riding an elevator going down into the sea.

So quiet too, but that didn't last. close to 1400 people actually went into the sea as the last of the ship sank. The waters closed over the stern, and Mike found himself afloat with all the others. At first there was no noise at all. The cold of the icey waters momentarily stunning everybody int silence. He took advantage of the oppertunity to try and swim to where there were as few people as possible. One thing that was of concern to him were his hands. The rest of him was protected, but his hands were exposed, and as vulnerable to frostbite as anything could be. Then the cries began, a few at first, but then the awful moans and cries of people pleading and crying out for help. It was impossible to make out what anyone person said, but it made little real difference as the memory would be the subject of some of his...and Teri's worst nightmares. It was a din that would be puctuated by two sharp bangs as the stern imploded on the way down.

"She's gone" one of the people in the lifeboat said, almost in a whisper.
"Shut up." a man snapped "We know."
This was the only real episode of such harshness that Teri remembered. Conterary to some romantic mythmaking by some historians, the survivors of the Titanic were not all one big happy family. Rankling animosities broke out even befor the Carpathia came to the rescue, and some would continue on that ship.

Some would last a lifetime.

"Ought we not go back?" Another asked.
"Into that mob in the middle of the North Atlantic? Are you out of your mind?" somebody retorted. End of debate. They did nothing while people died except mutter a prayer for the souls that were being lost one by one as the cold claimed the lot.

By three o'clock, it was as silent as a graveyard, and two boats were poking about hoping to find somebody, but Mike had seen enough. His part of the mission was over. Why he pressed on to the debris that he could see floating around him, he could never fathom, but he saw a small form huddled and shivering on one especially large peice that had come up from below.

As he closed in, he could see that it was a small child. A little girl no more then ten or so years old. When he reached the flaoting woodwork, he grabbed one edge, then grabbed her leg. Somehow, he manged to sctivate the "recall" control with his elbow.

What happened next was a senstation similar to falling as the horror befor him faded out. he found himself dripping wet and on the floor in a white room with the child as the brilliant flash of light which dazzled him faded away. A door opend and people rushed in. One of them was Inger Sheil.
"Damned if we didn't almost lose you, Mike. What did you..." she stopped as she saw the child shivering violently on the floor "Oh my God. You brought one with you?"
"You're bloody well not going to send her back." Mike growled. He recognised the girl now.
"And what if she's a survivor?"
"You know better then that. No children were fished out of the water. History lists this one as one of the casualties." It seemed a nicer way of saying 'one of the dead.'
"And how do you know that?"
"Because, this child is Lorraine Allison."
"Lovely." Inger said as she shook her head. The Oroburos Section was going to love this. Still, since the girl was listed as a casualty, there was no point in sending her back. It wasn't as if she would be a factor then. She turned back to the waiting med techs who just stood by the chamber opening, blankets and medical boxes in hand. "Well, don't just stand there like a bunch of bloody idiots. You have to patients here. snap to it!"
They did. Nobody with any sense defied Inger Sheil once she gave an order. As for Allison's reaction, all she could do was mange a confused look as blankets were thrown around her vilently shivering form and perhaps the one expected question.
"Where am I?"
"Some place safe." Inger said. That was all she was prepared to say for now.
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
503
7
183
Ummm...Michael? It's been a month! What happened to the exciting conclusion? You can't just stop in the middle of the story! I have to know what happens next!!!!

Desperatly,

David
 
M

Mike Shetina

Guest
I will soon continue both stories, sorry about that. I'm very forgetful! I'll soon put in the next few installments.
My Apologies,
Mike Shetina
 
M

Mike Shetina

Guest
I have decided that I will not continue the second story. I thought the first had not come through and it turned out that it did. Sorry about the double post. The second story was just one that I thought up of when I lost the first one. Sorry!
 
M

Mike Shetina

Guest
HERE IT IS THE NEXT INSTALLMENT! SORRY ABOUT THE LONG LONG LONG WAIT!

On Saturday morning, the 13th, I awoke and immediately took a dip in the plunge pool. Smythe has not shown his face in my presance since the incident on sailing day. The pool is cool for me. I climb out and ascend six flights of stairs- to the boat deck. I stand near the davits of a lifeboat. It's brass number reads 7. I see that Eustace is as sociable as ever. He's gossiping with one of the maids. Good lord, that man is a horrible valet.
Suddenly a voice behind me disrupts my thoughts.
"Lord Essington?"
"Yes?"
I suddenly feel lightheaded again. It is that man Smythe. Why must he keep bothering me?
"I would like to have a word with you in the privacy of your cabin."
"Why?"
"Please Sir, it is of the utmost importance."
I lead this man to my cabin. He immediately sits down and begins.
"When we thought that the squall would finish us off two years ago, you divulged a secret to me that you thought would never be revealed."
I stiffened but said nothing.
"Well sir, some very odd information has passed into my hands...

Part three coming soon
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
135
3
183
I wonder what happened to Mike's Part 3 and Michael's story...wouldn't mind having more stories coming in!
happy.gif


Charmaine
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads