Costa Concordia

Ada

Member
Dec 8, 2018
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You quote the Costa Concordia. The Report into that disaster clearly showed that the passengers on board the Titanic acted in a more orderly calm way than did their "enlightened" modern counterparts. I was actually briefly involved with someone at Southampton University on that very loss. I can assure you, the press and Italian Government involvement did not service to the quest for truth. However, this site is about Titanic so we'll let it rest there.
Agreed. Though there were many factors behind that, not just the "spirit of the age".

While the Titanic crew were vague about the severity of the situation, the passengers of the Concordia were flat out lied to, with a bilingual message to the extent that "The situation is fully under control, our technicians are fixing this as we speak". There is even a recording of a female member of the crew addressing the passengers after the hit where she tells them to go back to their cabins.
Then the Concordia lied to their own crisis center by saying that all they have is a blackout and that again everything is under control. They already knew they struck the rocks.

So when some time later suddenly the announcement was made to abandon ship, this stunned the passengers and caused instant panic. I'd say the conflicting announcements and lack of decisiveness on the part of the crew caused the panic.

I strongly believe this was not the passenger's fault (or their culture or age they lived in), it was the Costa Concordia crew and their announcements.

Stupidity and ineptitude are the greatest dangers man has ever faced.
 

Seumas

Member
Mar 25, 2019
401
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Glasgow, Scotland
You won;t get any argument from me over that one... not after 25 years of investigating ship-haps. ;)
Jim, just how often does some Para Handy character end up in charge of one of the world's big passenger ferries, cruise liners, ore carriers or oil tankers and causes havoc upon the waves ?
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
Jim, just how often does some Para Handy character end up in charge of one of the world's big passenger ferries, cruise liners, ore carriers or oil tankers and causes havoc upon the waves ?
Seriously? None whatsoever, Seamus.

In most cases, It very much depends on the individual's personality after qualification. Because each one receives exactly the same technical training and his or her certificate is only issued after the most rigorous of both written and practical examination. The academic standard requirement is very high. Each written stage is allocated a total of 1000 marks and the Candidate must achieve at least 70% total before being allowed to move on. To give you an example of the standard. In my later days. a Cadet could leave after 2 years and go to University and obtain a Bsc in Nautical Science. This did not exempt the candidate from any of the requirements for a Certificate.

Significantly, the Perishers submariner Command course in the RN, not only assessed a Candidate's technical ability but also mental stability.

I have found that in 99% of the cases I handled, accidents were exactly that. Usually a train of seemingly unconnected events arriving at full speed against the buffers.
It is always easy to allocate blame, but if there were no accidents, the London Coffee Pot which is Lloyds would be out of business. I suppose that's why I occasionally have a little chuckle to myself when I see armchair experts being wise after the event. Why I can be a bit of the pain in the posterior for some of our members?;)