Could a survivor have kept her status secret?


Arun Vajpey

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Theoretically, would it have been possible for a young female Second Class passenger survivor to have kept her identity secret on board the Carpathia (assuming that no other survivor knew her) and then disappeared into the crowd on arrival in New York avoiding the press as well as anyone hopefully waiting for her? I might add that she had "Third party" help.

If this were the case, she would be listed as one of the victims and lived out her life incognito.
 

Kyle Naber

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I don't see why not. I assume you got inspired by Rose from "Titanic"? I don't think the survivors would have been questioned much due to the severity of the situation and to avoid excessive trauma.
 
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Dave Gittins

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Although the US immigration authorities tried to reduce the formalities in New York, it would have been hard to get ashore incognito without some expert lying. The survivors had to convince the officials that they had money and somewhere to go. Given that the survivor lists radioed to shore were a bit rough, I suppose it might have been possible to get away under a false name.
 

Arun Vajpey

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I don't see why not. I assume you got inspired by Rose from "Titanic"?
Not at all. It is an idea that an acquaintance is considering for a story. It is about a young Lebanese woman travelling on the Titanic to join her husband (from an arranged marriage) in New York. She is accompanied by her infant son and two middle aged 'aunt' types. The older women are lost in the sinking but the 'heroine' and her baby survive and are helped by a young Dane that she met and befriended during the passage. They grow closer during the crossing on the Carpathia and by the time they reach New York, she decides not to join the Lebanese community or her husband there, instead going off with the Danish man by pretending to be his French-Algerian wife. He had a job and some funds to start with and could prove it. They move to Colorado and start a new life with her growing son oblivious of his origins.

The writer said that he was inspired by Kate Buss' temporary "disappearance" (albeit for entirely different reasons) on arrival in New York.
 
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Cam Houseman

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Theoretically, would it have been possible for a young female Second Class passenger survivor to have kept her identity secret on board the Carpathia (assuming that no other survivor knew her) and then disappeared into the crowd on arrival in New York avoiding the press as well as anyone hopefully waiting for her? I might add that she had "Third party" help.

If this were the case, she would be listed as one of the victims and lived out her life incognito.
Millvina Dean kept quiet until the wreck was found in '85. So, she "hid" her identity for 73 years. Thats enough time, lets say for example, for another 3 month old to grow up, have a family, and pass away. I say its possible
 

Arun Vajpey

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Millvina Dean was a 10-week old baby at the time of the accident and so had no first hand memories. I have not read her biography in detail and so am not sure what stage of her life she was told that she was a Titanic survivor. But her decision to keep quiet about it would be somewhat different from the hypothetical adult character fully aware of the circumstances of the disaster and making an adult decision in that story.

I know that the author completed the manuscript for the story but have no idea if they ever submitted it for publication. There were some upheavals in their life and I have lost touch for the past few years. But I know that the story is told mostly in flashback following death of the aforementioned Lebanese woman and a very old age (her Danish husband having died a few years earlier) and her son, now himself 70 years old, learning for the first time that both his mother and himself (as an infant) were Titanic survivors like his late stepfather.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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Sounds like that would have been an interesting book. I think in 1912 it would have been very easy to travel under the radar so to speak. Especially if they boarded with an alias. Once they arrived in NY they could simply go back to their real name or use another. Even today it can be done if your willing to walk across the desert.
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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If your asking me I have no idea. I haven't read her writings except for snippets. But just to take a guess I would think fairly young. Probably heard her mom talking about it with others. When it registered in her brain that it was a significant event...I don't know.
 
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