Could People Feel the Breakup and/or Stern Implosion?


Kyle Naber

Member
Oct 5, 2016
1,169
646
208
21
Just out of curiosity, would it be possible for someone in the water, close to the ship, to feel the breakup as vibrations in the water? Like when a firework goes off super close by or just very loud music in general, you can feel the bass of those sound waves in your chest. Would a similar effect occur during the breakup? The same thing could be asked about the reported explosions heard after the ship left the surface when the stern imploded and virtually went into a disintegrated spiral.
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
Jul 8, 1999
2,623
993
388
65
Not exactly what the OP is asking for but I am more interested in those people still alive within confines of the unflooded parts of the stern and it sank below the surface and eventually imploded. The question is, did the in-rushing sea reach all the air-filled spaces at the very rear before the implosion occurred?
 

Kyle Naber

Member
Oct 5, 2016
1,169
646
208
21
Not exactly what the OP is asking for but I am more interested in those people still alive within confines of the unflooded parts of the stern and it sank below the surface and eventually imploded. The question is, did the in-rushing sea reach all the air-filled spaces at the very rear before the implosion occurred?

No. The air pockets most definitely would have imploded before the areas flooded.
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
Jul 8, 1999
2,623
993
388
65
No. The air pockets most definitely would have imploded before the areas flooded.
That is what I also thought. There were a lot of passenger areas in the very stern of the ship and it is probably correct to assume that at least some people were trapped in there during the final moments of sinking. During the final throes of the sinking stern, some of them might have been knocked out or even killed by the shifting furniture etc, but a few, especially in the smaller Third Class cabins, might have been conscious as the stern went under. It then might have taken up to a minute for the implosion or flooding of that area. I shudder to think of what it must have felt like for those people in pitch darkness.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Rancor

Member
Jun 23, 2017
323
214
88
Also feel for those left in the dynamo room. Assuming all the watertight doors were sealed, I would guess it would have stayed dry for at least a short time. Would have been horrifying in the blackness with the angle of the ship and the noises being made as the hull tore apart.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Arun Vajpey

Member
Jul 8, 1999
2,623
993
388
65
I have a feeling that in the past some members might have inadvertently slightly exaggerated the part where they felt that loose objects would be "flying around" in the still dry stern spaces and cabins. Since the ship sank gradually for the most part, loose objects would have been displaced forwards as the ship sank by the bow. Then the breakup occurred at a relatively shallow angle (as is now considered) and even though the stern settled back, we now know that it probably did not come back-up vertical like it was thought earlier. Therefore, it is possible, even probable, that some of the people trapped in smaller enclosed spaces like Third Class cabins very close to the stern would have already have slid towards the forward wall as the ship sank. Such people could have remained alive, conscious and with relatively minor injuries (if any) for up to a minute in pitch blackness as the flooding water made its way past the various remaining bulkheads and other obstructions towards where they were.
 

Chris cameron

Member
Jul 4, 2016
102
46
73
It really does not matter how quickly the the ship sank by the bow, only the angle would have caused objects to move forward. Objects would not gradually move forward it would simply fall. Larger, heavier items that had a decent base would hold on longer or the type of flooring would play a part. Also, the angle was not so shallow that objects would not move forward. The 23-30 angle is not in any way inherently shallow, it is simply not the more dramatic 45+ angle that was originally theorized. Also, we have testimony(Prentice, joughin) from those who stayed on the ship until or near the end describing the difficulty walking and then an event were people were thrown off the stern presumably by the breakup. It was not a gentle event and I do recall reading that survivors described the noise of everything inside t ship crashing around towards the end.
 
Last edited: