Could the Media's Attacks on Bruce Ismay be Character Assassination


Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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Like that's effing awsome like language like you're like using Bob. I think like if I'm like right, the expression "Wicked" was first uttered by Terry Thomas not like a few like effing years ago.
I'm like writing in this like way so that like maybe some cool Chic, Dude or like some effing awsome liberal effing modern shrink can explain to me why I can't like effing understand like an effing word like what's being said on the TV nowadays by the intelligencia that passes for modern youth.
Heavens! It was our wedding anniversary the other day and my 50+ son sent us an email hoping "You Guys" will have a cool time. I was rather alarmed about that greeting. However, following a visit to the toilet, I confirmed that I was a 'guy' and that his mother had confirmed that she was most deffinitely not one. I pointed out to him the obvious that otherwise he would have found it impossible to to send us his greetings. However, since the temperature was 30c at the time I received his communication, I was able to tell him that I shared his hope for 'coolness'. I'm still waiting for his reply.

Might I suggest that the description 'Guys' might be just a little innacurate when describing a couple of late-age Septuagenarians of differing sexes?

Man, like all these yute and even my mains are like real rachet when it like comes to old Dudes like me. Yolo. SMH man.

Whateverthehellthatallmeant!

:cool:

Jim C.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Jim's amazing effort there reminds me that I forgot to mention the most popular adjective of all - "amazing". This is much used by people in vox pop interviews on TV, and increasingly by the interviewers too. It's much used in newspaper journalism, and of course in everyday conversation. Even the Royals are using it (but generally when describing one another). "How was your weekend, young person?" "We had an amazing time. How was your weekend, old Bob?" "Sick." "Awesome!" "No, I had a really bad cold."
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hey guys (sorry),

Yes, i'm afraid there's rather an over-abundance of adjectives for describing things or events these days that aren't necessarily deserving of that title, as you've all highlighted very well.

"YOLO" has got to be the worst abbreviation by far. And the fact that people these days say "LOL" instead of just laughing....and don't forget that if you're just resting up, you're "chilling".

Some of these phrases come and go and others are staples for decades or even centuries. For instance, to my astonishment, I discovered a while back that even in the mid-1800's, if a young man took fancy to a young woman, he would describe her as "prime" - a term which is still regularly used to this day.

Occasional cases like that aside, however, there is definitely a pattern of dumbing down the English language in recent decades....

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Jim Currie

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Hello Adam. I'll bore you just one more time then move-on.:cool:

I live in Portugal where every child has to spend 5 years learning English. They are totally confused at times by the fact that although they are almost fluent in the English language, they can hardly understand a word spoken by young, native English speakers.
This is surely the result of the crime being commited by educationalists and acadmics when they actively encourage young people who haven't yet mastered the language to experiment with slang?

As for the alternative use of language. It was most obvious in the writings of 18th and 19th century authors. Then they seldom used slang as they do today, but took poetic licence with the beauty of words. I'm sure you have found that most of the classic authors used the expressions "In the bloom of youth". The Flower of Scottish youth". Then as you point out Adam, there's the old grave- stone favourite "Taken from this wicked world when in the prime of life". Occassionally the then Yuppies of the day hi-jacked (now there's two expressions alien to me) old expressions from the Scottish Gaelic and Lalands languages and incorporated them into English. But these were not slang words or words with alternative meanings; just equivalents.
To me; to describe slang as 'new' words is a crime against sanity but there is already a Dictionary dedicated to such rubbish.
Heavens! an increasing number of children in the UK are unable to construct a simple sentence when they enter your version of "High School". The borrowing from other cultures and bastardisation of already corrupt words before fully inderstanding our own language is, as you point-out accellerating. Nowere else faster than in the native English-speaking countries including the UK. We now have Primary School "campuses" where we once had play-grounds. I choose campus because the word was not included in the Kings Dictionary of 1912. I know that for sure because I have a copy.
 

Adam Went

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Hi Jim,

I'm surprised to hear you live in Portugal! Not sure why i'm surprised, just wasn't expecting that.

You're spot on again, it would be almost impossible to teach somebody the English language including all slang, abbreviations, metaphors etc when it is not their native language and they haven't grown up around it. And then we have dialects of our own in a way! For instance, if you go to different states of Australia, they have different words or pronounciations for certain words and phrases which have, at various times over the years, perplexed even me.

I don't think evolving the English language is a bad thing, but degrading it with some of the colloquial nonsense that's come out in the past few decades IS a bad thing. Personally I probably speak more like somebody who lived a century ago, which is great until you encounter someone who thinks you're being a smartie and doesn't understand half of what you're going on about!

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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That's why they think you're a "smarty"!

There is a very bad negative culture out there which I think stems from the mistaken impression of pseudo-socialists that being intelligent and interested in gaining knowledge is a stigma similar to being born into a comfortably wealthy family. I call it the cloth-cap syndrome.
Politicians on the left are very happy to encourage and promote this negative "We're one of you" illusion. Politicians to the right can't promote the "Cloth Cap Syndrome" but they can create the "We're one of you" illusion by not speaking-out against negativity and actively smiling on the heads of our young morons who can't speak properly, are covered in tatoos and who cannot communicate without uttering the "F" word at least once in every sentence.
In fact, in the UK and Russia. we now see senior politicians on the left and right of center bending over back-wards to give this "We're one of you" impression. Why else would David Cameron and Vladmir Putin appear on the world stage without neck ties, looking like they were hurrying for a bus having just finished a hurried breakfast?
My educated guess is that we are seeing yet another example of how politicians regard their 'public'. Treat them like mushrooms; keep them in the dark and feed them massive amounts of manure.

Jim C.
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Hi Jim,

Yes that's very true, there is a theory which most seem to adhere to that if you are well spoken and like to make a good impression of yourself, that you must be from an upper class background - born with the proverbial silver spoon in the mouth, if you will. That is most definitely a fallacy - life is what you make it, you don't need to have millions and have been brought up with a private tutor to be able to teach yourself basic abilities in life.

As for this "we're one of you" phenomenon, our former PM Kevin Rudd took to using a Twitter account and posting 'selfies' on Twitter on a regular basis - one of, if not the first world leader to do so, I believe. He was also prone to using common sayings and slang terms during speeches, altogether trying to give the impression that he was more blue collar and "one of us" than white collar. Don't get me wrong, I liked Rudd, but he definitely divided opinion and this ultimately led to his losing the federal election just recently.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

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