Countess on Titanic

Apr 2, 2005
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I know that Father Brown has taken some photo with countess standing next to lifeboat. Does anybody know where I can find that photo? I tried on titanicphotographs.com but it wasn't there.
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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It's in Robert Ballard's book and numerous others. I'm afraid I'm having trouble thinking up which ones off the top of my head.

One thing - you are correct that it is often written that that woman is the Countess, but I've always wondered if this is true. I've always wondered if the caption "A woman stands in front of lifeboat #8, in which the Countess of Rothes later escaped" morphed into "The Countess of Rothes stands in front of lifeboat #8".

I'd be interested in hearing how that woman came to be identified as the Countess, if anyone knows. I am aware that she was prominent and Father Brown was British and he disembarked at the same port as her parents, so he might well have known who she was and made a note of it on his photo.
 
Apr 2, 2005
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yes, I know that it was in many books, but I am from Slovakia and those books aren't sold here. That's why I asked if I can find it somewhere else.
 
Sep 26, 2009
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I believe the photo is published in Walter Lord's "A Night to Remember" and is captioned that four days later the Countess of Rothes would leave the ship in the lifeboat in the foreground.
In the book of Father Browne's photos compiled by E. E. O'Donnell, the photo is captioned "The Titanic and tender America" and has no mention of the Countess. It was not included in Father Browne's original scrapbook, but added with a number of other photos for their historical importance. Robert H. Gibbons
 
May 12, 2005
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As Robert says, the caption for the photo of Boat 8 in "A Night to Remember" refers only to the fact that the Countess of Rothes later took the tiller of that boat. The people standing in the foreground are not identified. However there is a photo believed to be the countess on Carpathia that will be included in my upcoming article on her here on ET.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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All,

I think that photo is from the Cork Examiner, rather than a photo taken by Fr. Browne? I could be wrong.

I wish it would be possible to identify the woman, but given the fact that it's difficult to identify some people face on, from the back would be even more impossible.

Daniel.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
I didn't want to start a new thread only to make a simple question: is true that the Countess frequently wore magnificent tiaras and necklaces during the Titanic dinners? I heard that she owned an huge collection of pearls and diamonds, but I would like to be sure of that. And did she have as valuable jewels as Mrs.Cardeza or Mrs. Widener? I think her husband was very rich too!

João
 
May 12, 2005
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The countess did own magnificent jewelry but the claim she filed to recover the loss of her possessions in the sinking shows she had only a modest amount with her on board. As far as what kind of jewels she had, the claim indeed itemizes a lot of pearl and diamond pieces. The most valuable article of jewelry the countess had aboard didn’t go down with the ship. She had worn to dinner in the restaurant that night a 300-year-old pearl necklace, obviously a Leslie family heirloom, and didn’t want to leave it in the cabin when she went on deck after the collision. So the countess put it back on when she dressed. During WWI a pair of pearls from this necklace was included in an exhibition of famous jewels in London in aid of the Red Cross.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Thanks, Randy.I appreciate your information. I can imagine the Countess shinning Sunday's night with her 300-year-old necklace, throwing envy to modest woman.
 

Trevor Powell

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Aug 22, 2005
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Hello Randy, quite interesting is your information on the countess's pearl necklace. Would you know the wherabouts of it today-if it still exists?
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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This may not be the best thread to put this question but I'm interested in the Countess's personality.How was her relation with other people? Was she the typical delicate "flower" of high society or did she have a strong personality? I suppose that in this age young ladies were mostly creatures of porcelain beauty.

Thanks,João
 
May 12, 2005
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Hi, Joao and Trevor:

I should clarify that the necklace Noelle Rothes wore was composed of 300 year old pearls —— I’m sure it had been restrung!

As to whether the necklace is still in existence. I have no idea. I’m sure it is somewhere; I’m just not sure if it’s still in her family’s possession. When interviewing the late Ian Rothes, the countess’ grandson, some time ago, he didn’t mention it. I only found out about it recently while researching. It was a widely syndicated news item in 1918.

Regarding the countess’ personality. You’ll be able to read more about that in the article I submitted here to ET. It was handed in a while ago, and will be available sometime in the near future. But first, let me say that women of the upper classes were increasingly active and not just ornamental figures by 1912. Noelle was no exception, being much involved in charities and public welfare work.

Noelle was reserved, soft-spoken and charming, but also very determined in her personal and political views and outlook, which were fairly conservative. Noelle was actually bourgeois in her attitude, maybe even a bit pious, as family and church were extremely important to her. The countess made a career of good works —— a real-life "Lady Bountiful." She was motivational in her manner, bringing her quiet spirit of encouragement to her work with the needy — from the poor in her village (Leslie Township) to the soldiers and refugees she nursed during WWI.

Noelle and her husband were popular members of "high society," yet they didn’t indulge in the amoral, decadent lifestyle of other Edwardian aristocrats, being more domestic in their interests and tastes than was fashionable at the time. Noelle wasn’t a suffragette, though she was obviously a progressive woman in her own way. She rarely spoke in public at the political meetings she helped organize, and was not a "celebrity" in the modern sense (until the Titanic came along!).

Randy
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Thanks very much Randy. I imagine the Countess as a delicate and generous person but at the same time she was pretty sensible about politics and the way the world worked at that age.

Best regards, João
 

Trevor Powell

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Aug 22, 2005
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Hello Randy, Thank you for that bit of information. I am looking forward to your upcoming research article on the countess. If it's anything like the Helen Candee article or Dorothy Gibson publication, it will be nothing short of spectacular.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Well, I know the Countess was travelling to Vancouver to join her husband, but why? did they move from London to Canada? Where were their sons at that time? I would be very pleased if anyone could find the answer.

Regards, João
 
May 12, 2005
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Thanks, Trevor, for the compliment. The article is in our esteemed editor’s trusty hands now. It was a bit more involved than intended but I’m hoping that’s a good thing.

Joao, I appreciate your interest in Noelle Rothes. Your questions were my questions when I started my research. I think you will find most of the answers you’re looking in the article when it is published here (probably some time next month).

Of course, no one can exhaust every angle of a story, so there are things I probably missed. Still, the piece should put the countess’ life in some perspective for those who want to know more about her. She was really fun to write about. I half-expected a sort of jaded lady who, apart from her Titanic heroism, led a rarefied, pampered existence. Not so. She was a truly inspiring person.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Thanks, Randy. I'll be very attentive to the arrival of your article in ET.

Regards, João
 
Sep 1, 2004
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Veroniko, u te fotky byva napsane, ze je na ni clun cislo 8, ve kterem se pozdeji zachranila Hrabenka Rothesova (jak jiz bylo receno vyse). Tu fotku ti ale muzu poslat, jestli chces.

Zdravi Vita
 
Apr 2, 2005
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Bola by som velmi rada keby si mi ju poslal. Ale na viacerych strankach som citala ze existuje daka fotka na ktorej je grofka Rothesova odfotena dakde na Titanicu. Pravdepodobne to bolo pri tom clne, na promenadnej palube.