Cruise Ship revitalization


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John DeLoache

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Jun 3, 2004
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Did anyone catch TLC Sunday night? They started a multi-episode series called Drydock and follows the 23 day drydocking and complete renovation of RCL's Soveriegn of the Seas. I was on SOS about 5 years ago and remarked how old she looked then and was on her again in April five months after the completion. One part of the show focused on an elaborate clock in the lobby that had only worked for a week and workers remarked that if the couldn't get it working by the time they laid the new carpet they would rip it out. It was still there in April but still didn't work. I guess I'll have to wait until next Sunday to see if they got it to work at all.
 
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I saw it over the week by way of the repeat runs. If it comes on again, ship buffs will find it well worth watching as it gives a nice snapshot of the trials and tribulations of a refit, especially one that's done on a very tight schedule.
 
Dec 9, 2005
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At least she won't be sold off to second-tier, then third-tier operators, then 'mysteriously' sink in deep water on her way to Alang.
 

Steve Olguin

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Mar 31, 2005
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I have seen it a few times on repeat, great show. I actually find the interior design to be pleasing to the eye unlike the always-outdated looking QE2. Everything appears to be "tied-together" unlike the mismatch of rooms the QE2 now has after unthoughtful planning during her countless refits.
 

Steve Olguin

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Mar 31, 2005
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It is very sad that more thoughtful planning couldn't have been carried out over the decades. I have looked at everything I can regarding the QE2 and her interior design truly disgust me. Her interiors have the feel of a Grandmas house with odd bits of IKEA stuff thrown around. Her "grand staircase" could hardly be called grand. Just looking at the countless photos and deck plans of her, I can see how many improvements could have been made over the years that would still fall under the right side of the law. Looking at other cruise ships, the possibilities are endless. I just think a few certain interior designers need to realize that this is the year 2005 and people will not be satisfied with something that looks very much out of date. It's like when you have a best friend who has a really ugly house, and then they put all this money into it, buy all new furniture, and it ends up looking like a more modern day version of the crud it was before. I am thinking about changing my major from City Planning Commissioner to Cruise ship interior designer. lol. No joke. I might as well apply my love of ocean liners with something I am good at. Thank you ET for helping me make up my mind.
 

Joe Russo

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Apr 10, 2006
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Did anyone see National Geographic's "World's Toughest Fixes" television episode on the Radiance of the Seas? This aired this week. The episode was about adding a 300 ton diesel generator into the bottom of the ship.
They cut holes in the side and bottom of the ship and slid the generator in. They had to reroute piping, wires etc. and also accommodate a chimney for this huge engine.

The TV show didn't really elaborate the purpose for this which quite annoyed me, but I read later that this was done on all of the Radiance Class vessels as well as the Millennium Class of Celebrity. These were all strictly gas turbine ships when launched and apparently a gas turbine is a lot more expensive to operate because it burns the same amount of fuel while idling in port as it does at full speed. The 12 megawatt diesel generator is for use while the ship is in port.
Does anyone know more about this?
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Interesting, i wonder if this program will air on Sky TV, we have a Nat Geo program here. As for the QE2, I've found that people either love or loathe her. I think some of her trouble stems from Cunard sort of losing direction as a cruise company in the years before Carnivorious Cruise lines took over. I've heard that Mr Arison was surprised the QE2 was still very popular, despite all her troubles.
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

Guest
I also wonder what the interiors of QE2 will be transformed into, now she is in Dubai.
I have just looked at Majesty of the Seas' refurbishment and note she has a lovely curved bow, and that she is 16 years old, heck, I can remember her coming into service.
 

Joe Russo

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I know Ellen. Lots of mixed opinions on QE2. Lots of people love her, but I had friends that I talked to a couple of years ago and said that they had been on her and that it was "a dump."
 

Joe Russo

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I went on Majesty of the Seas two years ago before the refit and she wasn't all that bad. The rooms were tiny though. We're talking the size of a walk in closet.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Yeah. At the time that class of ship was built, RCL was using 120 square feet as the standard cabin size. Even when new, there was some negative comment offered regarding the....snug...cabins. By the 1990s, the RCL CEO was giving that cheery, pithy, quote about "Every cabin is a suite when you are asleep" to travel writers who asked about the rapidly-becoming-unacceptible standard cabin size on that generation of superliner.

My own experience in that cabin.....you learn the spirit of cooperation, as you and your companion develop the subtle dance which allows you to manouver from Point A to Point B without bowling one another over. You become very....close....
 

Joe Russo

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Apr 10, 2006
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Here is a picture of an oceanview on the Majesty of the Seas which was made up for 4 guests. You can see 3 lower singles and 1 upper pullman.
I can't see anyone doing this on a cruise longer than a couple of days. This is not unlike the Queen Mary when she was fitted for a troop transport.
The claim is that you are never in your room, but I wonder how much of this by sheer avoidance of the cramped space.
 

Joe Russo

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Here is the photo

majestyoceanview_copy1.jpg
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>The claim is that you are never in your room

A claim obviously made by someone who has neither cruised nor crossed.

Can you imagine four people trying to simultaneously get in to formalwear, in time for dinner, in that cabin?

Or, having friends over for drinks?
 
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