Cruise Ship revitalization


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>>Glad you're noticing Michael ;)<<

This sort of thing always gets my attention even if I don't say anything. In a way, it's a lot like old home week for me since I've been on ships which have gone through drydock availabilities. The mess and the dirt are all too familier.
 

Joe Russo

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I really like the idea of converting the basic oceanview cabins on the promenade deck to the lanai cabins (second photo down). They cut out the small window and replaced it with the sliding glass door with mirrored outside for privacy. The room is still very tiny to have a walkway to the outside door, but the effect of the lighting and view of a floor to ceiling window makes it well worth it in my opinion. The doors automatically close after about a minute. The wooden deck chairs are also reserved for that adjacent cabin. I think I would like this grade of cabin since one of my favorite things on cruises is people watching.
 
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Joe Russo

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Here are some of the first pictures of the Prinsendam after her refit and the new stern section of her superstructure. In my opionion, the result isn't nearly as bad as what was done on the Veendam.

http://www.hollandamericablog.com/2010/02/03/prinsendam-postcards-from-puerto-san-martin-peru/

See the stern before the refit:

http://media.shipspotting.com/uploads/thumbs/rw/399846_800/Ship+Photo+PRINSENDAM.jpg

http://www.cruise-australia.net/halprinsnyc1.JPG

http://pics.portofolden.com/PM05aa.JPG
 

Joe Russo

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Virtual Slideshow: Celebrity Constellation Refurbishment
quote:

How do shipyard workers complete seemingly impossible tasks, such as painting the ship's bottom or making adjustments to propellers? Every two (or three) years, a ship goes "off the grid," so to speak, making a pilgrimage to a shipyard for maintenance. In industry parlance this process is called "dry-docking" -- which, as the term suggests, means that a ship is actually taken out of the water and hoisted onto blocks in a big, waterless basin.

Most ships visit dry dock (well-known sites include Hamburg's Blohm + Voss and Freeport's Grand Bahamas Shipyard) for regular, mechanical upgrades or maintenance. However, every once in a while a cruise line will commit to a major refurbishment that includes significant alterations to passenger areas, too. Celebrity Cruises' Celebrity Constellation underwent just such a revitalization this year.
More at:
http://www.cruisecritic.com/virtual/virtual.cfm?ID=37
 
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