CSI Titanic : Who Died How?


Julio Cabello

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Oct 21, 2002
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Is it possible someone onboard was killed by an electric shock? Meaning, with all that seawater and DC appliances all over the ship.
 

Jacob Hughes

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Jan 30, 2013
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I have always wondered why they did not make rafts out of the hundreds of doors on the ship? Two to four doors tied together would of supported one to two people for a while.
 

jacque

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Feb 4, 2013
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i realy dont think that at that time people were worldly enough to think of this ,they thought they would be saved for sure self help just did not come to them in a time of panic ,besides doors on first class would be very heavy any below deck to hard to get overboard ,but this is only my opinion
 

Luke Owens

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Jan 18, 2007
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Jacque's comment aside (and it is a good one), the 1997 film showed how hard it would be to get more than one person aboard such a raft while it was in the water. To maintain the equilibrium of the door or other flat piece of wood, there would have to be equal pressures on opposite sides, otherwise it would flip over, causing anyone already on it to fall back into the water. In any case, people aboard such a raft would have died of hypothermia in the weather of the night; it would simply have taken longer.Brute's comment is also a good question. However, the actual killer in electricity is the current, which is not present in DC power. I'd have to do more research to find out the possibility of such a death before I made a firm pronouncement on the subject. I can say, though, that after the lights went out there was no chance of electrocution, since there was no power anywhere aboard the ship.I really ought to do a rewrite on this article anyway. In the six years since it was published here, I have found information that renders some parts of it less valid that I thought at the time I wrote it.
 
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Spark

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Sep 1, 2015
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I've often wondered how far down someone could have possibly survived in the titanic in any sort of air pocket. The best chance for any sort of sustainable air pocket might have been a walk in freezer (if there was any). I'd imagine with a good enough door and seal that one might have survived as far as half way down before the pressure imploded the door. All speculation on my part though.However, I do believe there is a good chance that inside the titanic is identifiable human remains such as bones and teeth. The only chance of finding bodies would be buried beneath the ocean floor, although this is not likely.
 
Nov 9, 2015
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Unimagineable gut wrenching last goodbye's. Screams for help and prayers for salvation and loved ones left behind. It cannot be imagined, not even in our worst nightmares.
 
I have always wondered why they did not make rafts out of the hundreds of doors on the ship? Two to four doors tied together would of supported one to two people for a while.
If you ever played with the kind of blown board that we had as kids, you would have know that it is almost impossible to climb on to it while in the water : it simply turn over when you try. This kind of raft would have done the same : people would have been unable to clim on it without it tipping over, and it would have floated if by luck someone would have been able to climb on it. He wouldn't have stayed on it much longer because the weight would have had it sunk just a little bit, about 1 or 2 feet. Archimède's laws ! However, maybe they could have been able to take doors, linen and everything to put it against the gashes of the TITANIC for the smallest one was of 5 feet and the biggest one was of 45 feet. In short :
1) 5 feet long, covering Orlop Deck and cargo hold
2) 6 feet long, just beside the first one
3) 16 feet long, covering Orlop Deck, Cargo Hold, stairway of the Forecastle Head, watertight Bulkhead B and a near cargo hold
4) 33 feet long, covering ballast deck and stoker's passageway
5) 45 feet long (the most important one) covering boiler room number six and a little part of the 5, Watertignt bulkhead C This is that one that determined the fate of the ship. If they would have covered that one with mattresses, linen and everything they would have find to put there, the rate of water coming in the ship would have been far more less and maybe at very small speed they would be able to go to Halifax. Maybe.
 

Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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Glasgow, Scotland
If you ever played with the kind of blown board that we had as kids, you would have know that it is almost impossible to climb on to it while in the water : it simply turn over when you try. This kind of raft would have done the same : people would have been unable to clim on it without it tipping over, and it would have floated if by luck someone would have been able to climb on it. He wouldn't have stayed on it much longer because the weight would have had it sunk just a little bit, about 1 or 2 feet. Archimède's laws ! However, maybe they could have been able to take doors, linen and everything to put it against the gashes of the TITANIC for the smallest one was of 5 feet and the biggest one was of 45 feet. In short :
1) 5 feet long, covering Orlop Deck and cargo hold
2) 6 feet long, just beside the first one
3) 16 feet long, covering Orlop Deck, Cargo Hold, stairway of the Forecastle Head, watertight Bulkhead B and a near cargo hold
4) 33 feet long, covering ballast deck and stoker's passageway
5) 45 feet long (the most important one) covering boiler room number six and a little part of the 5, Watertignt bulkhead C This is that one that determined the fate of the ship. If they would have covered that one with mattresses, linen and everything they would have find to put there, the rate of water coming in the ship would have been far more less and maybe at very small speed they would be able to go to Halifax. Maybe.
No.

There is far, far too much water coming in every minute and over too wide an area to do anything about it. Linen and mattresses are not going to stop it.

There was nothing to be done.

I wish Bob Read was still on the forum as he was great at exploding all these "this would have saved the ship" theories. None of it realistic.
 
Thanks for information. I know water is very strong. In Florida there was a kind of freak wave (not really a freak one in the sense of the strict definition of the term, but a wave much larger than the others and it sent me back to the beach, heels over head for a length of about 40-50 feet long. I wouldn't have been impossible to resist, and that proves water to be very strong. :)
 
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