Cunard Liner Histories online


Status
Not open for further replies.
Sep 12, 2000
1,513
6
313
Thnaks so much JMF for this information. I am working on some research and this site will be very helpful.
Maureen.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,367
390
433
Hello, folks---

You may also want to look at Jeff Newman's Great Ships web site(http://www.greatships.net/), where there are biographies of quite a few Cunard ships, as well as numerous others. While not as comprehensive as the Cunard web site and not a good source for technical data, Great Ships contains brief histories of many of the major liners of the 20th century, with more on the way.

MAB
 
Sep 12, 2000
1,513
6
313
Thanks a lot Mark. I have written it down in my notes. I feel like Thomas Andrews with my notebook being carried for notes and growing. Maureen.
 
Sep 20, 2000
1,072
4
313
Mark:

Thanks for the Greatships link! I didn't know about this one either, and only just "stumbled" across the Cunard link.

Looks like maybe David Sarnoff was right -- we may well be becoming one vast electronic community!

Best wishes to all!
JMF
 
Dec 12, 1999
997
5
313
Calm down, guys, I discovered Jeff Newman's site nearly one year ago, and I've been waiting for him to get back to me on the matter of which "Bremen" passed by the Titanic disaster site in 1912, since then. He provided some information, initially, and I haven't heard anything more. Maybe one of you out there knows . . . it was probably Bremen II. The first Bremen went out of service in the 1890s, I think. The Third Bremen was, again, I think, a U-boat. And the fourth Bremen came along in 1928. Somewhere I read that Bremen II was a WWI war prize, of sorts, and was renamed. It apparently went out of service in 1928.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,367
390
433
Hello, Joe---

Yes, it was Bremen II that was in service at the time of Titanic's voyage.

The first Bremen, NDL's first transatlantic steamer, was in service from 1858 to 1873. Bremen II, which entered service in 1897, was surrendered to Britain as a war reparation in 1919. Bremen III was a submarine put into service in 1916 by Deutsche Ozean Reenderei, of which NDL was a part, in an effort to maintain freight service to the United States during the war; she was lost on her first westbound trip. Bremen IV appears at http://www.greatships.net/bremen4.html, while Bremen V is at http://www.greatships.net/bremen5.html.

MAB
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,367
390
433
Oops! Forgot the following:

Sources: Hansen's Passenger Liners from Germany; Bonsors's North
Atlantic Seaway; Kludas' Great Passenger Ships of the World.

MAB
 
Dec 12, 1999
997
5
313
Without doubt, in my opinion, the coolest ship link on the internet is one I've listed before on here: http://www.gunilda.com. The site's photographs of this ship are really eeirie. The beauty of this underwater shipwreck has attracted several divers, who eventually lost their lives while diving on her.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads