Cunard Names


Status
Not open for further replies.
D

Daniel Odysseus

Guest
I was wondering this... The White Star Line has some excusable names, like the Baltic and Adriatic are both seas, Titanic means big, Britannic is a patriotic name, etc. But where does Cunard get its names? Queen Mary/Queen Elizabeth are understandable; they're kind of obvious, but names like the Lusitania, Mauretania, Carpathia, Caronia? Where did they think of these strange names?

-D.O.
 
B

Brian Hawley

Guest
Caronia is a great name! After an area in Sicily. Carpathia is in eastern Europe i.e. carpathian mountains, Mauretania is in North Africa, Aquitania is in southwestern France, and one I have always liked Parthia which at one time occupied areas now in Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaidzhan, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel.


www.bytenet.net/rmscaronia


Brian
 
D

Daniel Odysseus

Guest
Thanks... hmm. Didn't know why I didn't think about Mauretania and the Aquitaine as being possible name choices...

-D.O.
 
Jun 4, 2000
1,286
6
313
I'm with Brian on this one too: Cunard ships have great names, redolent of European history. I've enjoyed them as a reminder of the history of the Roman Empire and their ability to conjure images from Asterix the Gaul too. (Sorry!)

Aquitania is a great name for a ship: in her long life she certainly lived up to being named after a region with such a proud and culturally rich history.

For some reason my favourite Cunarders are the Carinthias. The first shipping postcard I ever bought was a Turner of Carinthia III. That Carinthia was the Roman Province of southern Austria (lakes and mountains), and is still used as the region's name, was neither here nor there - but I wouldn't mind visiting there one day.
 
K

Kevin Spaans

Guest
Hi there,

Lusitania was also a province of the Roman Empire which encompassed about half of what is now Portugal.

As Mr. Hawley mentioned Mauretania was named after a Roman Province as opposed to the African country, hense the variation in spelling: Mauretania (ship and province) and Mauritania (country).

~Kevin Spaans
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,360
376
433
The notable exception, of course, was Berengaria, who was Richard Lion-Heart's queen.
 
B

Brian Hawley

Guest
As Marks says Berengaria was the first cunardar named for a queen. Interestingly I once read that her crew sometimes referred to her as the barren area perhaps due to her teutonic decor. As far as the other Queens go I do think Queen Mary is a great name, but I cannot help think that Victoria would have been better.


Brian

www.bytenet.net/rmscaronia
 

Don Tweed

Member
May 5, 2002
590
12
183
May be wrong, but wasn't one of the chariot racers in Ben-Hur from Carpathia?
Wondering aloud as usual!!
-Don
 
A

Alex McLean

Guest
As mentioned above, Berengaria was the name of Richard-Lionheart's wife, but was also the first ship owned by Cunard not to be named after a Roman Province.
My best,
happy.gif

Alex
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Jul 4, 2000
6,360
376
433
Sorry, Alex, but Berengaria wasn't the first. Look at the fleet list on Cunard's web site and you'll find ships like Siberia (1867), Niagara (1848). Oregon (1884), Cuba (1864) and America (1848), places the Romans never heard of. Roman provinces were the customary, but not exclusive, source of Cunard names until QM came along.
 
A

Alex McLean

Guest
Oh really? Come to think of it, I do remember seeing some posters for the Cuba, and the Oregon was sold (given?) to them along with the Blue Riband from the same company which owned the famous Arizona (the name eludes me at this moment).
Sorry for the mix up!
My best,
happy.gif

Alex
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads