Cunard Website Errors


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Aug 31, 2004
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I was on the Cunard website and saw in the "Cunard Firsts" section that they said Aquitania was the first ship to have an indoor pool. Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't the Olympic have an indoor pool in 1911, whereas the Aquitania wasn't built until 1914? This has upset me to learn Cunard would lie like this.
 

John Zoppina

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Feb 5, 2005
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Yup, that's right. And even if the Olympic didn't (though I'm pretty sure she did)... Titanic sure did.

Oh well... worse lies have been told I suppose.
 

Mark Baber

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And even before her, Adriatic II had a pool; she properly earned the "first pool" distinction.

I thought we had discussed the errors---the pool claim isn't the only one---on this page of Cunard's web site before, but I can't find that discussion at the moment. Suffice it to say that this claim and others of equal validity have been on Cunard's web site for quite a few years, been called to their attention by quite a few people, and remain unchanged.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>Aquitania was the first ship to have an indoor pool

Might they have meant that Aquitania was the first Cunard ship to have a pool?
 

Dave Gittins

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Did Cunard think that Aquitania had the first swimming pool worthy of the name? Even White Star usually referred to their pools as baths, which seem appropriate, given their size.

I haven't the dates handy, but Imperator would have to be a candidate for the first real swimming pool.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Good point, Dave. That rather uninspiring water tank was possibly regarded mainly as the final (plunge bath) stage of the full Turkish bath routine. On the other hand, I recall from my childhood in the '50s that in the UK municipal pools even of large size were commonly referred to as 'swimming baths'. Nowadays the term 'swimming pool' seems to have taken over.
 

Mark Baber

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Nah, I think Cunard is just deliberately or recklessly overstating its historical importance as a pioneer. After all, they also claim that "Cunard introduced the first twin-screw ocean liner (Campania, 1893)," even though White Star's Teutonic had twin screws and entered service in 1889, and even she wasn't first; according to Bonsor's North Atlantic Seaway, the first was the (and, no, I'm not pulling your leg) Twin Screw Line's Notting Hill, which entered Liverpool-New York service in 1883.

They also claim that "Cunard introduced the first steam turbine engines in a passenger liner (Carmania, 1905)," even though her 2 December 1905 maiden voyage was more than eight months after the MV of the Allan Line's turbine-driven Victorian on 23 March of the same year.
 

Sean Hankins

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Well it seems that Olympic and Titanic's pools were about the size of a pool that someone would have at their house these days, which given that size does classify them as pools. Granted they werent the most extravagant facilities compared to what we see these days, but I dont know anyone who would fill their swimming pool with mister bubble and take a bath saying that it was a big bath tub and not a real pool. Yes, they were "real" swimming pools.
 

Tony Law

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Jan 1, 2004
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what was the first ship that sported a indoor
swimming pool or bath like Titanic's, was looking
at Cunards page and they boost that the Aquitania
had the first pool 1914 "Cunard introduced the first indoor swimming pool on a ship (Aquitania, 1914)." off their web page, I'm sure thats wrong
 

Mark Baber

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Hello, Tony---

Look up to see our most recent discussion of the shortcomings of Cunard's web site, including their discussion of the swimming pool.

Although for some reason I tend to prefer the Great Ships site to the Great Ocean Liners site that Mike S. referred you to, Adriatic is in fact the correct answer; Cunard's just wrong.
 

Ryan Thompson

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Dec 6, 2005
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"Cunard held the record from 1940-1996 for the largest passenger ship ever built (Queen Elizabeth, 1940). With the debut of Queen Mary 2 at 150,000 gross tons, Cunard will once again hold the record."

Didn't the France (now Norway) beak the QE's record when it was completed?
 
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