DDeck


This is a great source of ready information.
I agree with you, George. Perhaps we should start some. Maybe they'll be as successful as your All Roads Lead to Ballyhoo thread.

Thanks for the information again, Bob. It was nice to hear from you again. I saw that photo of the sofa berths out. Thank you. I'm going to study Titanic: The Ship Magnificent a little bit more. I feel a bit foolish asking questions when I have all the information at hand. But if I can't find the information, Bob, I promise I'll be back to ask questions. That way you can keep your "smokes" in stock
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Hi George, Ben, & Bob,

I finally broke down and ordered "Titanic, The Ship Magnificent" from Amazon today. They have the best price anywhere, but I'm afraid I'm gonna have to wait for the books to be 'in-stock' before they are shipped. Oh well. Can't beat the price.

I actually really enjoy the disective discussion of Titanic's fittings, furnishings, and cabins. Perhaps we should start more threads about these things at that!

I started a thread awhile back about Mustard and Mustard Pots on the Titanic. Other than perhaps toilet paper or the type of ink used in the ink-wells of the FC Writing Room, I don't think it gets more fine tuned than that!
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Hey, if other people can 'talk' for eons about rivets and steel composition, I wanna talk about fittings and furnishings.
 
Guys, there are plenty of such threads already here. Explore and you'll find them. They were started of course in those far-off days when most of the postings in this forum were actually about the Titanic.
 
They were started of course in those far-off days when most of the postings in this forum were actually about the Titanic.
Touche' Bob. Your absolutely right. As Ben said I started the most infamous un-titanic thread on the site but if ever a writer wants to use Titanic as a story idea and decides to go into the 1920's they'll have my Ballyhoo Jazz thread to look at. Then there's my Spanish Influenza thread. George, George, George. You nitwit, The site's Called for a reason not Historia Encyclopedia.
Actually I'm thinking of starting a thread in the Lusitania Pre-Sinking Topic about Cabin allotments and furnishing for the Lusitania Enthusiast. Right now we have hardly any threads on furnishings or what the cabins were like on the Lusitania.
 
>>Actually I'm thinking of starting a thread in the Lusitania Pre-Sinking Topic about Cabin allotments and furnishing for the Lusitania Enthusiast.<<

Fill your boots. That's why it's there.

Yes, we've gone off the reservation to a degree but you can only say so much about one ship to the exclusion of all else. Sooner or later, it spins off conversations on everything from culture and general history to news and current events in the shipping world. And ain't it funny how in the news, some of the same issues which were there in 1912 crop up today? Check out the casualties thread I've had going to see what I mean.
 
And ain't it funny how in the news, some of the same issues which were there in 1912 crop up today? Check out the casualties thread I've had going to see what I mean.

How true indeed. Shipping is changed with the invention of radar but not enough to stop accidents or pirates. Then you have other issues that we have deal with then and now.
 
>>Then you have other issues that we have deal with then and now.<<

Like the old profit before safety debate that the newsies loves to latch onto. Not always without justification either.
 
I was recently looking at the Discovery Channel plans on the Titanic. I saw a "W" in the plans, and I wondered what it was. I was wondering if it might be the toilet or perhaps the bath. However, inhibitions are preventing me from saying that it is the bath. I have a feeling Bob said something to the contrary about baths in the staterooms. Were they there or did all classes have communal bathrooms?
 
Ben from what you have posted I understand that the "W's" are in the staterooms. They are Wardrobes.

If you look at the plans you will see that in 1st Class that a number of the Suites and staterooms have private bathrooms attached to them, otherwise like 2nd & 3rd Class, 1st Class used communal bathrooms and lavatories. No bath or toilet was located in a stateroom.
 
OK, I totally forgot that I had already asked that question earlier in the thread. That's what I get for taking a hiatus, I suppose. Thanks for the information Lester. I have another question about the plans from the Discovery website. Does the FL next to the two enmeshed rectangles (where one is larger than the other) stand for something concerning a furnace, or does it stand for something different? My first hunch was that it stood for Fireplace somehow, but I was quite sure they only had those in the 1st class staterooms. Anyway, thanks again for your time everybody.
 
FL, literally = Folding Lavatory, but actually means folding washbasin or washstand.
The "two enmeshed rectangles (where one is larger than the other)" will be the FL. I guess it is drawn that way to represent the fold-down section.
If you said what books you have or have access to you could be referred to photographs.
Only the 4 Sitting Rooms had fireplaces.
 
The words 'lavatory' and 'toilet' do literally mean a place for washing, but there's a long tradition of using such words to refer to a place designed for a quite different but unmentionable purpose! Even today Americans insist in asking for the 'bathroom' when they almost certainly have no intention of taking a bath. Only the French come right out with it and call it a pissoire!
 
Lester, I have Titanic, the Ship Magnificent Vol. 2, but I spend much of my time at school, where I do not have access to it. That is why I asked this question. I was looking at the plans, thinking about how to depict something, and I realized I had no idea what the FL meant. However, if I would have applied myself a bit harder, I would have realized it referred to the washstand that you see in a lot of second class cabin photos.

Bob, we also use the word restroom, does that count?
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Anyway, I can see what you mean, though. It doesn't surprise me that the French are so literal in how they refer to things. I have taken five years of French, and there were a lot of words that were supposed to be taken quite literally, though my high school French teacher was mandated to not teach us the accurate definitions.
 
I have a quick question to ask. There are these boat-shaped wire basket items that are located next to the berths. You can view them in the following picture:

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My attention was first brought to these wire baskets while reading Polar, the Titanic Bear. Douglas Spedden would put his toy bear in it at night. It made me want to know what these baskets are and what they are there for. Any help is, as always, appreciated.
 
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