Dean Manning


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Dean Manning

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I don't post here to often, but I figured that I'd introduce myself anyway.

I'm 26 years old, and live in Millersville, Pennsylvania. After high school, I worked for awhile, and realized that the food service industry just wasn't for me. So I applied to college, and I've been there ever since. My plans for the future are to finish my mechanical engineering degree, and hopefully work in the ship building industry.

My initial interest in Titanic came after watching a documentary on the discovery channel. The documentary was pretty light on the "human" side of the tragedy, and mainly focused on technical issues associated with Titanic's break up. Naturally, I found the documentary to be fascinating, and my interest blossomed from there. Aside from the technical aspects of the sinking, I also find the Californian incident riveting as well. I don't do any original research, mostly due to time and money constraints. After I get my degree, I may venture out and explore some technical areas that still pose some questions.

Aside from studying allot, my other interests are listening to music and practicing martial arts.

-Dean
 
Jul 14, 2000
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Hey Dean, glad to see your post here. Ship building would definitley give you a unique perspective to consider questions about the Titanic.
Good to hear from you.

Yuri Singleton
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Welcome Dean. I just found you here after you posted somewhere else. It is great to have you here and thanks for sharing about yourself. Some write postings but are not listed here. This helps for us ot get to know each other.

Martial arts,...so we need to be nice to you right?
 
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Dean Manning

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hi maureen.

It's rather ironic. I post my bio here but don't post much else. There is a pretty good reason for it though. I'm content to throw my hat into the ring when it comes to technical stuff, but, aside from what's in the more general Titanic books, I don't have a lot of knowledge. There are plenty of highly skilled and respected Titanic researchers that post to this board. So, I just keep quiet and marvel at the knowledge that is posted here.

-Dean
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Well, we'll just have to throw out more hat in the ring throwing type questions. Hmmmmmm...let me think.

How abiut this one. Were portholes allowed to be opened to staterooms and if so were some opened that night and if so how much water damage would that have caused?

If they were not opened, at what depth would they have weakened and burst open?

Okay, I don;t see the hat yet?
maureen.
 
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Dean Manning

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ok, ok. Twist my arm, why don't you. Of course, if you twist it hard enough, I won't be able to throw my hat! ;)

In any case, here are the answers to your questions.

I'm not sure that the portholes were allowed to be opened, but, I do remember reading that Henry Sleeper Harper had his porthole open when the iceberg went by, and some small chunks of ice fell into his cabin.

How much water damage would that have caused? Hmmm, a ton. In fact, I think open portholes and vents were instrumental in helping to speed up Titanic's sinking toward the end.

What depth would they have broken at? It's hard to say without knowing how thick the glass was and what it's yield point is. There is also the question as to whether there is water on the inside of the glass. If, for some reason, the room behind was filled with air, then the window would shatter. But if the room was flooded, then the pressure differential between the inside and outside of the glass would have been about equal and the glass would not have broken.
happy.gif


So, there you have it, the hat. ;)

later!

-Dean
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Wow,, thanks for the hat kind sir! I was trying to manufacture something that would take you a while to think about and ...pop...its done.

Well now, I;ll just have to get working on harder stuff for you!

I'll get back to you. I wonder when Bill sinks his boat this weekend if he will leave the windows open so that we can meaure that. Just kidding Bill.

Have a great day. Maureen.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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For what it's worth, quite a few windows were found intact when the wreck was first located and examined.

As to how much trouble open windows can cause, a look at the Titanic's unfortunate sister Britannic would be illuminating. Quite a few portholes were open on the ship when she struck that mine.(They were opened by the nurses). They were, if memory serves, on E deck. Despite more extensive subdivision then the Titanic, the Britannic sank in about an hour. Of course, having watertight doors left open which wouldn't close because of the blast damage was most unhelpful as well.

When I was on the Comstock in the Persian Gulf after Desert Storm, we had all watertight doors closed on the second deck and below...just in case we hit on of the mines that were drifting around waiting to be found.

Any ship can be a minesweeper. ONCE! We just didn't want to pay too high a price for it.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Dean Manning

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hey Michael and Maureen!

I got to see one of the in tact portholes at the Atlantic City exhibit either this summer, or last summer, I can't remember which. It looked like it had been tortured (along with a 3 ton section of the hull). The frame looked ok, but the window itself was cracked. I couldn't get over how thick the glass was and how small the porthole actually was. Interesting.

On the History Channel's show Histories Mysteries: Olympic and Britannic, they had mentioned how much water one open porthole would have allowed to come in. I don't have the number in my head right now, but I remember it being astronomical. Of course, the History channel doesn't hold my highest opinion with regards to their accuracy.

Michael, do you know if all the watertight doors were left open on the Britannic, or just the one in the compartment where the explosion took place? I seem to remember hearing that the door in the bow section was partially closed.

Riveting story, Michael. Unless you have experience at sea, which I don't, then you just don't consider too much the situations you can get into, and the anxiety that's involved in them.

Maureen, you just keep rippin' those questions off!

later!
-Dean
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Dear Michael and Dean,
You guys are a wealth of knowledge. The window information was so interesting. The difference in just having windows open on one deck level made all that difference. Was the damage more extenive as well or about the same?

I would be a nervous wreck thinking about the mines. You and many others have such experiences at sea. It would be great to hear amny of the stories that many of you have experienced.

I wonder if a study of the portholes and the ones that broke would shed any light on our suction/sinking study?

But for now I must come up with yet another question....Okay....what was the floating cork in the water that they found from....was it an insulation for the ship or just lifebelts gone bad?

Maureen.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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G'Day Dean, an attempt was made to close the watertight doors, but not with complete success. The critical door was between boiler rooms five and six which was blast damaged. So too were the forward bulkheads so that instead of two to four compartments being flooded, six were flooded. Also, the Captain tried to run for shore to beach the ship...a very bad move for two reasons; it made launching the lifeboats impossible,(An unauthorised attempt to launch two resulted in them being chopped up by the ships propellers) and also served to force water in at a faster rate. The doors should have been closed in the first place, and none of the portholes should have been open.

Your disdain for the History Channel is well founded, especially in regards to History's Mysteries. I recall seeing the show you mentioned and noticing one mistake after another every few minutes or so. I'd have to see it again in order to get specific. I do remember the Olympic being hooted at as unfortunate. This was far from the reality. Yes, the Olympic had a few bad moments, but overall, she was a very successful and much loved ship throughout her career.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
Hi Michael and Maureen!

Michael, Thanks for the information, it's much appreciated! I don't know why the Olympic got such a bad wrap on that show. The worst thing that happened to her was her two collisions-one with the Hawke, and the other with the Nantucket Lightship. Oh yeah, and the encounter with the German u-boat.

Maureen, it's thought that the cork on the surface came from the refrigerated cargo hold. The hold was insulated with cork, and when it imploded due to water pressure, the cork floated to the surface. ;) Thanks for the compliments!

later.

-Dean
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hi Dean, with a host like Arthur Kent who always seems to be hinting at some sinister angle, I'm surprised they didn't try to make the Olympic look even worse. Stone Phillips would love this guy!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
hey Michael!

pretty funny post. I got a good chuckle out of it. I think people have a tendency to try and make the trio of Olympic class ships look bad, it adds drama if, not only the Titanic, but both of her sister ships had horrible histories as well.

Now that I think about it, Author Kent just looks plain evil, especially with that stupid squint he does when the dialogue reaches a critical juncture. "...and the Olympic(squint, squint) went down in history..." .

he, he.

-Dean
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I can see these two collaberating on a wedding night documentary. I can just see the title,

"The wedding night, conjugal bliss or DEATH between the sheets."

Perhaps Kent can toss in some hint of a sinister conspiracy.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Sep 12, 2000
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he he he he hehhe......this is too funny. There are no words in the english language to express the tears that are now streaming from my face from laughter.

Cause it wouldn't matter if it was theirs or some one else's wedding night. "and that is it and what it was"...(blink blink).....or was that a squint squint...hard to tell honey.....

You guys are a stitch! Maureen.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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As I read this, I'm watching my tape of Titanic, Anatomy of a Disaster. I got it off of the British Discovery Channel when I was in Iceland.

MUCH better then any of Kent's commentaries and Dr. Cullimore is in it.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Aug 20, 2000
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Hi Dean!

I'm voicing what Maureen has said, but I must say you are a wealth of knowledge. I've enjoyed your posts and I apologize for not saying hello to you earlier.

Good to have you aboard!

Best regards,

Jason D. Tiller
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
HI Jason!

Thanks you so much for your compliments! They are much appreciated! Up to this point, I've pretty much posted just to technical stuff(but that may change, now that Maureen has forced me to " throw my hat into the ring" more often...), but I do read most of the other post. I find you and many others here much more knowledgeable than I!

Anyhow, looking forward to reading more of your posts!

-Dean
 
Sep 12, 2000
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"I find you and the others here much more knowledgebale than I!" Great, so you got the check to say that....no wait...I mean, Yes, Dean anytime we geniuses can be of service just call...uh....um....Geoff....yeah he'll know.

You are worth your weight in gold with all that you share. Thanks for being here with us Dean!
Maureen.
 
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