Deck restrictions 3rd class

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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>Do you mean travelling westbound, in relation to the TB, Jim?

Both ways. The passenger of whom I spoke was exceptionally attractive, maintained a home in the London Ritz and another in North America, and commuted incessantly. This person was also dying of tuberculosis, and died almost immediately after returning home post-disaster. Yet, not once did the US or UK authorities note "contageous" or "terminally ill" on the score of entry papers generated by the commuter lifestyle.

So, I am partially in agreement with Felix. Classism DID play a part in the regulations. If you were poor and Irish, a heart murmor could get you deported. If you were middle class, Scottish, travelling in second class, and senile, it would be noted on your papers that you were senile, but you would not be deported. And, if you were rich and English, you could vomit tuberculous phlegm on to your table mates with impunity and it would, officially, never raise an eyebrown.

Mrs.Fyfe: That was a lovely bath, stewardess. Thank you.
Mrs. Morecroft: The ship sank, ma'am. You were in the water for two hours. That's why you are all wet.
Mrs. Fyfe: I think I left my bag in the bathroom. Would you please pop down and get it for me; then I will have some tea, if you don't mind.
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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198
Another oddball health 'event' from the May 1 crossing. Robert Kay, 7 and traveling in second class, broke out with measles en route, and was put into a cabin in the bottom of the ship. With him was his mother, Marguerite Kay, who was days away from giving birth! Whether she was quarantined with him, or opted to stay with him is debatable... even then, the danger of that situation was well known, and that a doctor let a nine month's pregnant woman stay in a small room with a child infected with measles is unfathomable.

Be that as it may, no one came for them after the torpedo struck. They made it to the boat deck at the last second, after helping one another up the stairs, and were immediately washed overboard. Robert survived, atop overturned Boat 22, but his mother was never seen again.