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DESIGN OF TITANIC DOUBLE BOTTOM

Discussion in 'Hull & Construction Issues' started by Ajmal Dar, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. Ajmal Dar

    Ajmal Dar Member

    Does anyone know about the detailed design of Titanics double bottom? How many sections wad it divided into, was there access into it, etc, erc

    Regards,

    Ajmal
     
  2. Sam Brannigan

    Sam Brannigan Member

    Ajmal Dar likes this.
  3. Lee Lance

    Lee Lance Member

    Thanks for the hint about "Titanic's Hidden Deck".
    Looking at the plans, it seems to me that if an Olympic ran aground, pressure on the outer bottom would be transmitted up the supporting members to the inner bottom, damaging the inner bottom. It seems that there was no attempt to make a "crumple space" so that damage might be confined to the outer bottom.
    How are double bottoms designed in modern ships? Are they different from Titanic's? Do they work?
     
    Ajmal Dar likes this.
  4. Jim Currie

    Jim Currie Member

    Hello Ajmal.

    DBs today are much like the ones fitted to Titanic.

    If a ship grounds, she rarely does so on a single point unless it is an underwater mountain peak.

    Double bottoms should be viewed as a 'system' rather than treated as a series of tanks sandwiched between an inner and outer bottom.
    The system is cellular in nature...each adjoining 'cell' helping to share and redistribute the pressure on a ship's bottom due to grounding.
    In most cases of grounding, the ship settles or rubs along a flat seabed. Consequently, the load on the bottom shell plating is transmitted to and borne by the immediate internal structure such as the transverse "floors" and intercostals.
    In most of the grounding surveys I have made, the damage was usually distortion to the outer bottom plating being set up between the deep floors of the DBs. In cases of raised seabed hard points, the internals would also be buckled.

    In fact, one of the original ideas was not a double bottom, but a double skin. Leonardo. (Da Vinci...not Di Caprio) had that idea a very long time ago. Here's the proof:
    Italy trip 2013..1 014.jpg
     
    Ajmal Dar likes this.
  5. Ajmal Dar

    Ajmal Dar Member

    Dear Jim,
    Thanks for this most informative answer.
    All the best, Ajmal
     
  6. Ajmal Dar

    Ajmal Dar Member

    Hi Sam,
    Thanks very much for the article.
    Regards,
    Ajmal