Diana Preston's book


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Jim Kalafus

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PASSENGER PROFILE 3. Considerably shorter than the Samoilescu farce is the "back story" behind one of the secondary characters in Hoehling's book: Edwin Friend. Edwin Friend was 28 at the time of his death aboard the Lusitania, and the details which Hoehling provides are that Friend was the travelling companion (whether by pre-arrangment or coincidence is not stated) of Theodate Pope, that they shared an interest in psychic phenomenon, and that at the end he jumped first and smiled encouragingly to her from the water before she jumped as well and lost sight of him.

Edwin Friend was a Harvard Graduate. He had travelled to Europe at least once before, when doing graduate work at the University of Berlin -it is recorded that he returned via Liverpool aboard the Celtic in 1911. He had taught at both Harvard and Princeton and, in 1914, became the secretary of the American Society for Psychical research, in which capacity he was travelling when lost.

There are tales of Friend's spirit manifesting at seances at different points in 1915/'16. One can consult George Behe's Lost At Sea for considerably more detail on this aspect of Mr. Friend.

Friend's wife, Marjorie was 23, married for less than a year, and pregnant when widowed. Her daughter was born on September 22, 1915 and was ".....and will always remain defective." Mrs. Friend believed that the shock and emotional strain on her own system from losing Edwin so abruptly was the cause of Faith's condition. She, Faith, was placed in the Massachussetts School For The Feeble Minded and remained there at least through 1924, at a rate of $364 per year. Mrs. Friend was left destitute and was said to have been supported by friends- Edwin's salary had been about $2000 per year. She married Eastman A. Weaver in 1920, and in 1924 was granted $10,000.00 for her loss, and made the custodian of a $10,000.00 payment for Faith. Marjorie most likely died in 1981, and I do not know the ultimate fate of Faith.
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Thanks Jim! As usual great stuff. Hey, do we know absolutely if Friend was accompanying Pope? Or was it just a matter of their meeting on board? I wonder is Pope herself makes mention of him in her published diary excerpts. I have heard of them but have never read them. I do know that Pope's niece doesn't mention him in her book on her aunt's career.

Thanks again.

Randy
 

Jim Kalafus

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I had wondered about that in my posting. My guess (and it is only a guess) is that they knew, through their interests in the ASPR, that they would be on board the same ship, but that they were not "travelling together" in any other sense of the word. My guess is based upon the fact that Theodate, as early as 1916, was speaking of Friend, by name, in various letters- had they been conducting themselves less than honorably she likely would have skipped over his being on board altogether, or left him unnamed in her accounts rather than semi-publicly linking her name with his. I might be wrong, for as I said, this is all just a hunch.

She returned to the US, via Bordeaux, aboard the Espagne in August 1915. Ellis Island has misspelled her name as "Theodore" and on the manifest itself it looks more like "Theodora" than Theodate. The age and Farmington Conn address (not to mention that "Theodore's" gender is given as 'female') are a dead giveaway that it is her record.

I have a 'to be published" letter by Theodate detailing her experiences, and there is a long account by her, with photograph, in American Heritage which can easily be found. I was surprised to see Theodate 'in the flesh' so to speak in American Heritage. Hoehling referred to her as 'severe' looking and other authors parroted that over the years- in my head I always pictured a butch Margaret Hamilton type which, it turns out, was far from the case. She was probably one of the more attractive women on board, along with Mary Hammond, Dorothy Conner and the Canadian Mrs. Hammond who survived the wreck only to die, presumably of TB, a couple of years later.
 
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Diana Preston's book Lusitania: An Epic Tragedy
and The Last Voyage of the Lusitania by
A.A. and Mary Hoehling are the most
definitve books on the Lusitania,
her passengers, crew, and people involved
 

Mindy Deckard

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I have read Diana Preston's book...I wouldn't say it was really controversial though. It was just a really good read.

[Moderator's Note: This message, initally posted to a thread on a different Lusitania book, has been moved to this pre-existing thread. MAB]
 
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