Did the stewards and stewardesses sleep together?


Hitch

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Can anyone tell me: Did the Stewards and stewardesses sleep together in one big room? Or did they had separed cabins?

(And was this also with the restaurant staff?)

Thank you.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Nope. Think about it...co-ed sleeping arrangements in 1912??? No way Jose! The sexes were strictly segregated. My understanding is that the really large berthings up forward were for the firemen and deck crew. The others were in cabins which had several people in a room.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Carl,

The stewards generally slept in large (i.e. a number of people to a room) cabins on E deck, while the stewardesses usually were berthed 2 to a cabin, in the various stewardess cabins throughout the passenger accommodation.

Daniel.
 

Hitch

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Thanks guys.

So that is also for the restaurant staff?
Because I see on the plans of E deck that in the front of the ship, two places (a big one and a smaler one) where made for restaurant staff?
 

Bob Godfrey

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The two restaurant cashiers (female) shared a small cabin in between 1st Class staterooms E24 and E28. Everybody else was in the crew accommodation area on the other side of E deck, in large dormitory cabins (eg the waiters) or smaller shared cabins according to status. These were located towards the rear rather than the front of E deck, aft of the engine casing.
 

Hitch

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Thanks Bob.

And with how many beds was such a large cabin on E deck? And can you maybe tell me what ells was in such a room.

And was cabin number 117 used by restaurant staff?
Sorry for all the Questions.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Would you like to know the colour of the curtains?
wink.gif


The dormitory style cabins contained rows of two-tiered iron bunks (about 12-18 in that area) and also lockers for private property. The smaller cabins, with up to 4 sharing, were probably much like the 3rd Class passenger cabins. Crew cabins were not numbered.
.
 

Hitch

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But if they where not numberd, how can you know where someone stays? Like if a staff member wants to tell another staff member where his or her cabin is, how can he/she tell?
 

Dave Gittins

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Violet Jessop mentions decorating her two-person cabin with family photos, calendars and the like. She also tells of persuading the junior electricians to provide extra lighting.
 

Hitch

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Thanks Dave.

And did women and men staff sleep together? Or did they had separate cabins?
 

Bob Godfrey

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If any did it certainly wasn't White star policy. Maybe that's why they had the foresight to leave the numbers off the doors!

There were no female staff in the restaurant except the two cashiers already mentioned.
 

Hitch

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So they where separated?
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Oh I did end knew that. Thanks Bob, for telling me.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Mmmmmmmmmm...bear in mind that this is 1912 were talking about here, with all the mores and attitudes that came with the deal. Co-ed accomadations just weren't the sort of thing you would see on a prim and proper liner of the period...unless you were a passenger and married.
wink.gif
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Oh, I don't know. I'm sure the WSL made it as difficult as possible, but I bet it went on. If memory serves, ANTR has a scene where a fair unknown hand beckons a gentleman clad in pyjamas and dressing gown (and cravat! I think) into her room. Clearly first class, of course, so that's alright then, and he would have been assumed to be on the way back from the bathroom had anyone seen him, I suppose. Joseph Boxall was an advisor on the film set, and he would surely have said something had it been a sheer fantasy. But no co-ed accommodation ... especially not for the servants!
 

Hitch

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Thanks Michael.

Its for the story I'm writing. And its about a female restaurant member.
So I need to be sure. Women and men staff where separated for sleeping?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Women and men staff where separated for sleeping?<<

Yep. That doesn't mean that a couple with a desire to "couple" couldn't find a nice quiet out of the way place to get it on if they really wanted to do so, but sleeping quarters were strictly segregated.
 

Bob Godfrey

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La réponse simple: Oui, c'est vrai. Les deux caissiers féminins du restaurant ont partagé une salle avec seulement deux couchettes. Des femmes de l'équipage ont été toujours données les endroits séparés au sommeil, loin des hommes. En 1912 il était impensable qu'ils dorment dans le même endroit.
 

Bob Godfrey

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No, but I'm assuming that Carl does and I think he might be having trouble with our English colloquialisms. He might have even more trouble with my French!
 
Jun 12, 2004
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I speak and read Spanish and therefore learned some French. Bob basically said that it was true that there were only two women who worked as cashiers in the restaurant ("Les deux caissiers féminins du restaurant ont partagé une salle avec seulement deux couchettes.") and that the female crew slept in separate quarters from the male crew ("Des femmes de l'équipage ont été toujours données les endroits séparés au sommeil, loin des hommes"). It was a summation and reiteration of what was stated before - a confirmation - only in French.

Sorry, just thought I would clarify that, hehe.
 

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