Dinner on the S.S.Romanic

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Robert M. Himmelsbach

Guest
Eeeek! Shelly, don't get me started! I belong to a Medieval and Renaissance re-enactment group, and I've won awards from them for cooking and "Feast preparation" in those styles. Believe me, compared to some of the things our furthest ancestors ate, Ms. Beeton and her contemporaries were the highth of modernity and civilization! I've made (and eaten) some amazing things including tripe, of course, eels boiled in red wine, the ever popular haggis, and have recipes for things even I wouldn't loose unpon an unsuspecting feast hall. Even with their relatively (historically) trained palates, most of my fellow medievalists would blanch at some of the items.
Still, my favorite recipe is from a 1498 Venetian cookery book which has a confection made with cannabis seeds much like marzipan - take a pound of the seeds of Sativa (now the species name of cannabis sativa) and soak them overnight "and those that float shall do you no ghood at all"...grind the soaked seeds with sugar and rosewater, cinnamon and nutmeg and form into balls. "Many have reported seeing visons from these". Alice B. Toklas, eat your heart out.
Of course, I've never actually MADE this dish (who the heck keeps that many seeds around?)it being illeagle and all that, but I find it fascinating!
Mrs. Beeton remains, even today, one of the great classics of cookery, and is still used as a basic reference even by many who aren't trying to do historically acurate cookery.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Good to see you Robert- missing you over at the fashion thread lately. Amazing what people consider edible- I envision you in full reglia at a banquet table tearing a leg off roast baron of lamb or something equally thrilling- dripping with velvet and chains and embroidered waistcoats!. King Richard's Faire in Massachusetts runs about 3 weeks in the autumn and is a Renaissance festival. Charlie Sachs used to do a Titanic Tonight evening out in California which I think would be wonderful for us to do-I even have my Heart of the Ocean to wear (I would plan to have many MORE garments on with it however- unlike our Rose!). Everyone needs a little fantasy now and then- some of us need a LOT!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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I think I must mean REGALIA- too many cannabis seeds in my granola today! I say- maybe the ET Board needs a Coat of Arms- How about a Golden Hind Rampant on field azur with white star? What do you say ,Phil? And a proper motto -of course. Any ideas?
 
May 12, 2005
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All,

The London Ritz was in Edwardian times one of the most elegant hotels. It is still famous for its Palm Court, with its rose-capped chandeliers, Louis XVI chairs, marble tables, and Sovonnerie rugs. Here one must sometimes book months in advance for a table. On Sundays "tea dances" are still held in the Ritz restaurant, just as before WWI, and ladies are always encouraged to wear hats for tea. In fact one is not allowed to appear in casual dress at all in the Palm Court.

The Ritz is noted especially for its smoked salmon sandwiches. Here is a recipe from "The London Ritz Book of Afternoon Tea: The Art and Pleasures of Taking Tea" by Helen Simpson (New York: Arbor House, 1986):
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THE RITZ'S SPECIAL SMOKED SALMON SANDWICHES

1/4 lb. smoked salmon trimmings

1 1/3 cups heavy cream

2 tbsp whisky

1/2 tsp white pepper, plus extra

1/4 tsp grated nutmeg

brown bread-and-butter

2 oz slice smoked salmon, cut wafer thin

lemon wedge, to serve

Mince/chop smoked salmon finely. Stir single or 2/3 cup heavy cream and coax mixture through sieve/strainer, using back of wooden spoon. Beat in whisky, pepper, nutmeg. Chill.

Whip double/remaining heavy cream until stiff and fold into chilled mixture, little at a time. Spread slices of brown bread-and-butter with mixture, then carefully arrange wafers of smoked salmon across this. Season with freshly-ground pepper. Press slices of buttered brown bread on top and remove crusts. Cover sandwiches with clean cloth (wrung out in cold water) until you are ready to serve them. Serve with wedge of lemon.
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Helen Simpson's book is filled with Ritz recipes for sandwiches, scones, cakes, and all those wonderful puff pastries that we so associate with tea-time.

Steaming cups of Darjeeling (the "champagne" of teas) and Earl Grey are still the most popular teas served to guests of the Ritz Palm Court, but Fermosa Oolong (with its flavor of peaches)and Lady Londonderry, named for the famous Edwardian hostess, are also "first-class" selections.

Randy
 

Kris Muhvic

Member
Sep 26, 2008
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With rumbling tummy, I have a couple questions: I realize that "shirred" eggs were served on Titanic, but what was the proper way to serve/eat them? Out of the ramekin, or were they popped out onto the plate? Also, I have heard of "coddled" or maybe "cottled" eggs...any idea? I have only recently aquired a taste for soft-boiled, sunny-side-up etc. eggs (runny yolks scared me!) I found some charming old ironstone egg cups...now, how does one break into the egg in a most dignified manner? Is there a rule, such as "never with a knife, only a fork" or something like that? Don't want to splatter table-mates! Ouef! I should know these things, I feel like such a Neanderthal!

Bon Apetit!
Kris
 
R

Robert M. Himmelsbach

Guest
To respond to Kris: Shirred eggs were usually served in their ramekin, same as soft-boiled eggs were served in a glass or ceramic egg cup.
I don't recall anything about them being de-containered for eating - after all, you don't want any of the sauce or butter at the bottom to run loose!
 

Kris Muhvic

Member
Sep 26, 2008
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Thank you, Robert, for that clarification. No! don't loose the butter! I admit, I'm one of those freaks of nature who can eat anything and not gain a pound. With that said, and now I've made a number of enemies (don't hate me! I despise being a bean!)...there is the question of "salads". Now, from my understanding, the leafy-type, of which we are used to now, was not common in the western-style cuisine. I have heard of an old book of etiquette with the rule "never cut lettuce with a knife" which dates to the 16th cen., but I'm not sure of how the lettuce was served. Judging from vintage catologues, salad servers (wooden spoons/forks/bowls) was a rarity, maybe only one or two examples. The term "salad" circa 1900, it seems, refers to a more "dressed" grouping of prepared veggies, like a cucumber salad, potato salad, etc. rather than the chopped greens and tomato, i.e. Italian, style. Of course I could be off base here, just wanting to know for sure.

Kris
 
R

Robert M. Himmelsbach

Guest
Kris: Indeed, "salad" in it's current incarnation as leafy greens or (ick!) chopped iceberg and a limp slice of tomatoe is a relatively recent invention. Iceberg, in particular is fairly recent, and more a response to resauranteurs desire to serve something cheap, filling, and non-fattening (until you add the dressing!)
In the Middle ages and Renaissance, a salad was any composition of vegetables "dressed" with a sauce, sometimes including meat or fish - a favorite one of mine from a 16th C. cookery book was sliced onions, thin slices of salmon and violets - as in the flowers. Obviously a Spring thing, but what a colour combination! Others include spinach, orange segments,dried beans that have been soaked and softened, and raisens or currents.
Most leafy greens served in that period were rinsed leaves snapped off the stalk or bunch and eaten by picking it up by the stem end and stuffing it in your mouth! Keep in mind that our monstrous huge cabbages and lettuces and so on are the result of years of breeding for bigger and more flavorless, and in that time a lettuce leaf was more like what today we call lamb's lettuce or other, smaller leafed greens.
Now that you know more than you ever wanted to...
 
J

Jack Dawson

Guest
If I may be allowed to join this old conversation, from my collection:

"Passengers who desire to order Dinner in advance should ask their Waiter at Luncheon for the "Carte du Jour." Dinner is served from 7 o'clock onwards.

R.M.S. "FRANCONIA." SUNDAY. JUNE 15, 1913


% LUNCHEON %
Pickled Oysters Norwegian Lax Lyon Sausage
Mayonnaise of Salmon
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. . . HOT . . .
Consomme Crecy Potage Parmentiere
Spanish Omelette-to order
Macaroni au gratin Curried Chicken and Rice
Haunch of Mutton--Onion Sauce
Lima Beans Baked, Chipped and Mashed Potatoes
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TO ORDER FROM GRILL (12 Minutes)
Philadelphia Squab and Bacon Mixed Grill Steak a la Minute
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. . . COLD BUFFET . . .
Cumberland Ham Ox Tongue Galatine of Veal
Poulet en aspic- Argentine Pressed Beef
Leicester Brawn Boar's Head
Roast Beef Capon
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Lettuce Tomatoes Beetroot
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Apple Pudding-Sweet Sauce Compote of Prunes Fancy Pastry
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Ice Cream and Wafers
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Cheese- Cheshire, Wiltshire, Gorgonzola, Stilton, Camembert
St. Ivel, Cream, Gruyere
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Dessert Tea Coffee
 
J

Jack Dawson

Guest
"Canadian-Australasian Royal Mail Line

Luncheon
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Pea Soup
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Fried Fillets Silver Mullet
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Fried Pork Sausages & Mashed Potatoes
Baked Pork & Boston Beans
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Cold
Roast Beef Roast Mutton
Spiced Beef Bologna Sausage
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Baked Jacket & Mashed Potatoes
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Salad ---- Assorted
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Stewed Peaches & Rice
Boiled Treacle Roll & Golden Sauce
Cocoanut Buns
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Mandarins
Cheese Coffee
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R.M.S. Niagara May 18, 1918"
 
J

Jack Dawson

Guest
"Cunard Line R.M.S. 'SAXONIA'

TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 1910.
>>> LUNCHEON <<<
Lyon Sausage Bismarck Herrings
Bordeaux Sardines
HOT
Consomme Julienne Scotch Broth
Omelettes au Jambon Macaroni-Italienne
Lamb Pot Pie
Roast Ribs of Beef ---- Browned Potatoes
Dressed Cabbage
Baked, Mashed, Friend and Sweet Potatoes
FROM THE GRILL. (10 minutes)
Squab and Bacon Mutton Chops
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COLD
Roast Beef Chicken
Rolled Ox Tongue Boars Head
Cumberland Ham Brawn Pressed Beef
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Salad:- Lettuce Tomatoes French Dressing
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Rice Pudding
Pancakes:- Plain & Sweet Fancy Pastry
French Ice Cream
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Cheese- Cheshire, Gorgonzola, Wiltshire, Camembert
and St Ivel
Dessert
Ceylon, China and Blended Teas Coffee"