Do you wish to one day dive on the Titanic wreck

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Tarn Stephanos

Member
it fascinates me that there are many lifelong Titanic buffs who coulnt even be paid to dive on the wreck...
For me, seeing Titanic on the sea floor is my greatest dream.....


Tarn Stephanos
 
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Eric Paddon

Member
It's just a matter of realizing that I wouldn't really be able to see much in that kind of cramped setting. Maybe if we had comfortable submersibles where you could be standing up and looking through a translucent porthole lining the length of the sub, that would be different, but I wouldn't want to get in one of today's submersibles anymore than I'd want to fly in a small private plane.
 
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Jeremy Lee

Member
You know how much the dive costs? US$35,950 per person!!!!!!
 
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Janet Orpen

Guest
I would love to go down and see the wreck. I think it would be so cool to have the bow emerging out of the darkness and then realising just how deep you are.

I have dove to 150ft. I have a long, long way to go.
 
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Tom Pappas

Guest
Wouldn't bother me. If anything went wrong, it would be all over in an instant. Bring it on!

p.s. Light planes aren't death traps. If you read the accident investigations carefully, you will find that 99% of them involve some form of human folly. Flying, like operating a motor vehicle, is only as dangerous as the pilot/driver makes it. In both cases, if you don't do anything stupid, your odds are very, very good.
 
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Don Tweed

Member
There was a trip offered on E-bay for around 3,000 dollars. A 10 day trip on the Keldysh.
You did not get to dive on the wreck, but you got to assist with the submersibles and watch the others dive on the monitors. Of course if you wanted to dive just add about $25,000 to the kitty! Then again, pay the $3,000, and when they are about to launch a submersible pull your hidden weapon, take a hostage and go down!
I wonder if there are Titanic freaks in prison?
Happy

Just kidding, Don
 
Kritina Johnston

Kritina Johnston

Member
No, I absolutely would not go down to the wreck, but it's not just because of being that far down in extremely deep water in a confined space...it's 95% to do with the fact I'm absolutely terrified of seeing the wreck that close-up. How many people can say that, I don't know, but unless my submates would want to be trapped for three hours with a panicky madwoman who's going to go even more ballistic when she sees the bow looming up out of the dark, then I think it's just one of those things I'll pass on.

(Why do you think I haven't seen Ghosts of the Abyss? I even had to cancel my order at Amazon for the book!!!!!).
 
Cathy Akers-Jordan

Cathy Akers-Jordan

Member
Tarn,

Assuming I could afford it and overcome my claustrophobia (I'm with Kim on that one!), I'd be like Bill Paxton only worse. "So this is where they oxygen comes out, right? What number means there's a problem?"

Guess I'll have to settle for Imax.
Happy


Best wishes,

Cathy
 
Kate Bortner

Kate Bortner

Member
Oh my gosh, how can you even ask!?! While I am historian of the "dry" ship, I would give my right arm to see it. Yes, I hate close spaces, yes, I need to pee often, and yes, I fear the length/depth of the dive, but NO (extreme NO!) I would never pass up an opportunity to see OUR ship. My heart is there; of course my eyes yearn to be there too.
Any one who has ANY connections: I am a school teacher who will pass on my knowledge to our future leaders: pick me. I want to go. I will keep the whinning down to a minimum and I will only pee with exicitment in my own wet suit. Take me. I'm a "sport" ;->
-kate
 
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Deborah Russes

Member
I am afraid of the closed places and being in the dark for so long, unable to control it...but, I on the other hand, if someone said I could go down and see the ship, I'd bet I would jump at the chance. I've always found that if I did or tried to do something I was afraid of, I ended up being glad I did it.
 
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Arron Strachan

Guest
I attended an Titanic weekend earlier this year and spoke with a person who has been down to the wreck.

AS he said,
First, keep in mind that this is the final resting place of hundreds of people.
Second, the ship has been there for ninety two years now and the Titanic 'as it was' is no more.
Finally, there have been so many people/companies that have wanted to 'pay their respects' and have left plaques and memorial signs, they have become an eyesore to the memory of the ship.

A company were running a competition to take a dive to the Titanic however after speaking with this man I could not even bring myself to enter.

With today's technology and with the documented history that we have unhindered access to, there is no need for tourist trips to the Titanic. As has been previously mentioned, 'Ghosts of the Abyss' the IMAX movie gives you far more view of the ship that you could experience in a tourist dive.

Respect the area for what it is, please do not exploit it.
 
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Andrew Parodi

Guest
>

I understand the sentiment of wanting to respect the resting place of the victims, but I think we should try to keep in mind that many people have different ways of respecting the resting place. For some people, leaving plaques IS a way of respecting the resting place of the victims. For others, visiting the site and perhaps even bringing back relics for museum displays is yet another way of showing respect.

It is indicative of our Anglo-Saxon heritage that we view respect for the dead as not visiting the places where they died. I remember watching a documentary about the "Day of the Dead" in Mexico. This is a day where relatives of the dead will decorate the graves of their loved ones. The relatives of the dead will sometimes even sit on the graves and have a picnic. It is a community event, and even often a tourist event. The narrator of the documentary commented on seeing tourists film - with video cameras - some of the displays. The narrator told a man whose father's grave was being filmed, that he thought it was very rude that tourists were filming the grave. The man said that he thought it was a way for the tourists to pay their respects to his father and the dead.

So, it's a cultural attitude that we have. We view death as wrong and we don't even say "dead" anymore. It's as thought it is wrong to die in this culture. I can't help but think that this cultural perspective has to do with many people's attitudes about visiting Titanic, bringing back relics, etc.

Now, if people were bringing back bodies, etc., then I'd have problems with that. But there are no bodies left.

Unfortunately, this is all a heated topic that I doubt will ever be resolved. I doubt that all parties involved will come to an agreement on this issue. But I myself have now changed my mind. I don't think I'd want to ever visit Titanic. I was in the midst of an obsession with Titanic when I started this discussion. I'm not so obsessed anymore now. I don't think the risk involved is worth seeing what, as so many have pointed out, can better be seen in footage already taken by filmmakers.
 
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