Dolls on the titanic

Dec 2, 2000
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To all, if you wish to read the information I had written above it is located under:

Encyclopedia Titanica: Third Class Passenger: Elin Ester Maria Braf [www.encyclopedia-tit anica.org] Accessed Mon May 20 22:24:18 2002

Sorry it took so long to get back to that.
Maureen.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Kris- Dolly Dingle rings a bell because both she and the Campbell Soup Kids were created by American artist Grace Drayton- Dolly was a wide-eyed Edwardian, created at the turn of the century. Am not sure about silesia- it used to be a part of Germany-now it is in both Czechoslovakia/Polan d. Dolly Dingle repro paperdolls can be found in Dover Press catalogues. No doubt many children had paperdolls on Titanic for playthings as well as balls and tops. Yo-Yo's (from the native Philippino for come-back) have been around for 2500 years, sometimes as weapons- but not popular in recent times until Duncan rediscovered it in California in 1920 beng made by a man named Flores and bought out the rights. Duncan also invented the Eskimo pie and Good Humor Truck. So no yo-yos on Titanic. After the doll, it is considered the world's oldest toy. Must do some research on ball and jacks. Of course picture books,modelling clay and paintboxes of watercolors were Edwardian favorites. Children were easily amused in those days- a lesson in there somewhere! Marshall Drew, aged 8- having no pencils and drawing paper, picked out a silhouette of Titanic with a pin on a scrap of paper after Carpathia reached New York and he was taken to a hotel- this he did whilst sitting on the stairs listening to the adults.
 
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Wow, that it great Shelley.

When I was eight I am sure that I poked holes in paper in the shape of QE2, but I was influenced by Picasso and Andy Warhol.

How in the world do you know all this stuff Shelley?

I am totally and completely amazed at the paper and dots. Is this saved somewhere?
 
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Mo- sadly it was not saved, as was the case with many bits of memorabilia-who could guess at the time that this stuff would acquire such meaning 90 years into the future. Marshall did save the Titanic hatribbon from the Barber Shop- Union Jack and US flags crossed with RMS TITANIC in gold lettering. Aunt Lulu had it rolled up in her handbag. Some of these anecdotes are not published (except here on ET). All this minutiae is from chats with these wonderful folks over the years and stored in my trivia-loving little cranium. But can't remember my social security number!
 
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Okay Miss Shelley Boat People Loving person that you are, you need to get a pad of paper and a pencil and start right now to writing a book so that your trivia-loving little cranium packed brain can be preserved forever in a book! So my great grandchildren will read this and love it all.

And if you can teach me to remember my social, I'll teach you to remember yours.

Maureen.
 
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Maureen- somewhere in this vast repository of knowledge I began a thread called Survivor Memories to Share or something like that- have spent 30 minutes trying to find it! I hate to repeat the same stuff all over- maybe the first time put some people to sleep! I was once a bartender at Symphony Hall and found myself passing the time with Beverly Sills in the Ladies' Room. When I asked her why she retired from the stage so early she replied with a grin "Always leave when they wail 'So soon?' -and NOT 'When is that woman ever gonna shut up and LEAVE!!"- so if you can find that thread... I have a few more good stories yet untold! I may write someday on Lizzie Borden- but far greater brains have had the best words on Titanic. Always wise to know one's limitations.
 
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Shelley, I respect you for that and totally understand what you mean about finding a thread at times.

And I agree with Sills in regards to singing voices.

Maureen.
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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I agree about the doll being probably the oldest toy...I found out that one of the few, if not only, surviving fragments of wood found in Pompeii was the charred remains of a carved doll. Although I also found out that a great many people are rather afraid of dolls, espescially the old ones. Maureen- you mentioned the metal-heads and the the practical nature as opposed to china...the only thing is that they would chip. The paint or enamle would give way to a pocked marked dolly! Now, evidently, people would re-paint them. I have seen examples of this in antique stores; and the result, I admit, is a rather frightening, mummified looking doll!

I pointed out above, in Sears-1902, the toy section was 4 pages long...that's it. Judging from everything I have heard and seen, whether it's family stories, vintage photos, biographies, etc., children just didn't the multitudes of toys, even the wealthy children, that most kids today have. I know I didn't have mountains of toys, but to my Grandparents my three-THREE! sets of "Lincoln Logs" was decadant!

Can I go outside and play?!?
Kris
 
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Kris,
So true about the numbers of toys kids had. Three sets of Lincoln logs, now I am jealous.

My interest in the doll maker is Titanic research related.

Maureen.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Oh, also Kimberly , just wanted to thank you soooooooooo much for the other posting about Nina and the Christmas disply. That is great.

That is most helpful.

Maureen.
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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Maureen-

I wish I could help you with the identification of the doll, the only things that I can offer- judging from the photo- is that it was a swivel-head (the rounded shape of the neck bottom, probably with a hole for the string or maybe even elastic cord to be fitted into a shoulder part). The top has a flattened opening....possibly with holes for the stitching of a pad-type thing (think of a pin cushion concept) where the wig would be stiched on. I really want to say the glass eyes are stationary- glued or cemented in- because the "moving" eyes would have metal weights affixed to the inner-eyes inside of the head. Now, not sure of what type of metal, but if it would rust, we would probably see the discoloration on the bisque.

I know these are little details...but maybe they could narrow your search a bit(?).

Take care-
Kris
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Wow, thanks Kris. You, Shelley, Kimberly, and Randy have been so encouraging and helpful.

I have a video of the doll head, but do not have a photo of it. I have a woman that I researched for who would be glad to see if she can id it. Anyone have any ideas for web sites that have the doll's head displayed?

Maureen.
 
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Of course the area around the doll's head would lead us to better understand what type and who the possible owner was. When assuming the doll to be of the highest quality and price it is said that the dolls were made up of porcelin head and hands. Assumung it was a complete doll, the hands should be nearby. Perhaps buried, perhaps not. It seems more likely that the doll has been romanticized a bit due to the fact that people want to believe it belonged to Lorraine Allison. The fact is, there were over 2,000 people on board and dolls, either owned by children, carried by adults, or collected by anyone, were probably high in numbers.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
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Dec 3, 2000
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hello Erica,

That may very well be true, but since there isn't anything to link the doll to Loriane Allison, we can only speculate; which isn't much. In reality, it could have belonged to any of the children on board. I doubt we'll ever know for certain.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hi Erica,

I found Harold Lowe's quote in one of Inger's posts discussing him. It's one of my favourites as it means what it says. There are at least a few other quotes that Inger has posted.

As soon as I find them, I'll post them for you.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Dec 3, 2000
8,242
5
198
Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hi Erica,

My mistake, I was only able to find one other quote on here that Inger posted. Here it is, which is quoted from James Moody:

"What a lot has happened since then, and what a distance I have covered." - JPM, 1908

I know of one more from Moody, that I've seen on another Titanic forum that was posted by Inger, but I'm unable to find it on there. I recall it being something to the effect of "When I get home, we'll spend all the money in the big fat bank!" You can post your question in the "James Moody" folder under "Crew Research" for the information, since it's off topic for this thread or send her a private message through the board by clicking on her name. I know she'll be more than happy to answer your query.

I hope this helps.