Dr Ballard's New Expedition


Paul Lee

Member
Aug 11, 2003
2,235
26
243
Hi Nicolas,
You're not the only one who can't see the name on the bow. Could someone please post a picture with the letters outlined, or arrowed?

On another note - the "disappearing" stern plaque, oh yes, that old chestnut. I put on my copy of Titanica because I was sure there was a shot of the peeled over poop deck on the stern - and there was. Sadly, the reformatting of the IMAX image for 9:4 meant that the outer edges were missing, which is where the fairlead rollers (the plaque being between them, on the starboard quarter). Darn.

Best to you all

Paul

 
Dec 24, 1997
599
16
263
Going back to the NOAA (Ballard) discussion,
did I not read some posts claiming that the damage to the Wireless Room roof was done by Submersibles landing on it?????
To my knowledge and my visuals, they never parked on that roof. They did however use the Elevator Housing Roof for landings just aft of the open expansion joint. The Wireless Room Roof was too cluttered with gear and the skylight to have made a space large enough for a Submersible I would think.Ken did a marvelous painting of Alvin sitting on the Elevator Housing Roof, try to find it, it is great, maybe he will post it. I have it but will not post it unless Ken give me permission sorry.
 
W

William Barr

Guest
I was kind of curious as to where the crow's nest is today. Finding it may provide an answer as to how it fell?

More productive than the finger-pointing that will go on forever and change nothing.

Ballard claimed it could have fallen into the cargo hatch during his special. If it is, it should still be visible and may have fallen in a way where whatever was inside the nest is next to it.

Too bad NOAA did not allow Ballard to enter the ship. I wonder why look but do not touch means a no enter policy.

On a side note I watched Ghosts and Ken Marschall is credited as Bruce Ismay as one of the ghosts, it was kind of a fun notable as Don Lynch was also in the credits as a ghost.
 
Oct 23, 2000
397
4
263
One more thing, Ken, and this is related to the wreck itself: in "Titanic: An Illustrated History" there is a marvelous painting of yours showing the bow section of the Titanic wreck with the minisub Alvin hovering near it's after end.
The bow section still retains much of it's orginal paint in this artistic work of yours (i.e. white on superstructure, black above the waterline on the hull, and red below the waterline). Was this done as a "what if" depiction, or was it based on evidence of remaining original paint? I do know that in 1986, when this painting of yours is set (natch) at least some of the red paint below the waterline remained.
Just curious, and I hope I was clearer this time as to what I meant. LOL. :)
Your paintings are just amazing, by the way!
:)

Richard
 
Mar 3, 1998
2,745
253
358
Jon,

There's not much distance between the elevator machinery room and the Marconi suite of rooms. The submersibles may have settled right over the elevator machinery, but they might have bumped something as they manoeuvred into position (working against the current). The fact of the matter is that the central rod of the Bradfield connector, the outline of the base of the aerial trunk which surrounded the connector, the top half of the mushroom vent that vented the Silent Room, the aerial downlead and the anchoring point for the downlead are all evident in the 1986 ANGUS photos. By 2001, all traces of the above have been obliterated (the only thing left is the opening for the Silent Room vent cut into the deck). There's no direct proof that submersible landings is the cause behind this loss of evidence, but it's a reasonable assumption to make.

Regarding your private message to me about the switch seen in the remains of the bridge cab (your post #291 above), I believe that we're looking at the electric time control mechanism for the automatic fog horn system (Bruce's patent).

The Morse lamp on the cab was controlled by a watertight Morse key that was normally stowed somewhere in the bridge area (possibly the wheelhouse?). The key was brought out when needed and attached by plugging a two-pin cable leading down from the lamp into the side of the Morse key box. The key could be worked by foot or by hand and had a small resistance lamp inside the box's lid which cut out every time the key was depressed (in other words, when the lamp was illuminated, the small bulb inside the Morse key box wasn't). The bulb was behind a glass panel, upon which the Morse alphabet was engraved. So, when the key wasn't depressed, the user had a lighted reference for the Morse characters.

But that may be more than you wanted to know. I hope that I answered your original question.

Parks
 
Mar 3, 1998
2,745
253
358
Jon,

As I read your message again, I have to ask...do you know that the Marconi rooms are also abaft the expansion joint? It seems to me as I re-read your post that you might be confusing the skylight for the officers' WC for the Marconi Room skylight, but maybe I'm wrong in this. The roof over the Marconi Rooms, elevator machinery room and the aft staterooms on Boat Deck made for one large, relatively uncluttered landing pad.

Parks
 
Dec 24, 1997
599
16
263
Parks, It was most certainly not more than I wanted to know you cleared up my questions beautifully as you have always done on this forum. I also see now what you meant by the radio room and elevator roof proximity. Thanks so very very much for you great assistance GNOM
Cheers Jon
 

Ken Marschall

Member
Jan 8, 2002
122
29
193
Richard,

Thank you for the compliment on my artwork. In the wreck painting to which you refer I tried to illustrate the fact that recognizable paint does survive on many areas of the hull. White paint (now a cream or light yellowish-tan color) can occasionally be seen next to windows and ports, black paint on the hull here and there (particularly at the bow), and LOTS of the red antifouling paint survives.

Ken
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Scott Newman

Member
Jun 16, 2004
184
2
183
Hi guys,

I'm new to this and I must first say I don't even pretend to know "everything" about Titanic. I am, however, a huge fan and love to hear about the facts, myths, and conspiracies behind this magnificent piece of history. I think it's great that Ken Marschall participates in this message board. Ken, I love your work. I only dream of being able to paint like you. I tried to draw the Titanic once with a crayon at a famous local restaurant...it didn't work out.

As far as this Ballard vs. everyone else debate that is going around, I too have a few comments. Clearly Ballard believes that the site shouldn't be touched. Whether this is because of some moral debate he has within himself or because he has a "I found it first" attitude is beyond me.

I enjoy the exhibits that "RMS Titanic Inc." has to offer. I don't mind recovering some items for the wreck, but where does one draw the line? I recently visited the Salt Lake City site. I was amazed at the items on display but the display had more of a "carnival" atmosphere than a museum. Visitors pay 15 dollars a ticket. I can get cheaper tickets to an NBA game.

Finally, Cameron's work was much more of a discovery, in my mind, than Ballard's most recent expedition. So much was revealed on that expedition. I was dissapointed in the "live" broadcast last week as many of you were. Ballard stated in an interview that everybody since him has gone down and "played" with Her [the Titanic] and not truly studied her. I'm not sure what point he was trying to make...as far as I can tell, Cameron's expedition was much more revealing than Ballard's. I guess I'll wait for the second episode before I make a final decision.

I do have a great respect for anybody that has dedicated themselves to the study of this wreck. I don't always agree with the theories and ideas, but I love the conversations. Thanks for the input on this site! It's because of you all that I am spending all day at work reading this stuff instead of accomplishing actual work!

Scott
 

John Melish

Member
May 17, 2004
31
0
156
Hello Scott,

I was planning on going to the Salt Lake exhibition this summer. I was wondering about the items they are displaying. Is part of the "Big Piece" there? I am also curious about the "carnival atmosphere" you mentioned. I hope it has not come to that. I went to the artifact exhibition in Seattle in 2001 and the artifacts were presented with the utmost respect.

Also, I know what you mean about reading stuff on this site at work. Very addicting.
 

Scott Newman

Member
Jun 16, 2004
184
2
183
John,

I do need to rephrase a little bit. The exhibit was actually really interesting. I made the mistake of going the first day it opened. There were lots and lots of people there. I guess "carnival atmosphere" is a little harsh.

Part of the big piece was not there. The pieces I remember most were clothing and jewelry. There was an interesting money display as well.

There were so many people there that day. I didn't feel "moved" when I went there. I guess that's where that comment came from.

As I stated before, I don't believe salvage is wrong. However, as Indiana Jones once said "It belongs in a museum!"

Today we see replicas of Titanic selling for hundreds or even thousands of dollars. When it comes to the Titanic, there are those who see dollar signs, and I think that is unfortunate. I think that most of us on this site enjoy the history and drama of the Titanic story, not the obsession to capitalize on the events that took place in 1912.

I would say go see the Salt Lake exhibition John, it's quite interesting...just don't go on a Saturday!

Scott
 

John Melish

Member
May 17, 2004
31
0
156
Thanks for the info Scott and I will try to go there during the week.

Like you, I see the Titanic for it's historical value and drama. I would love to see a museum dedicated to Titanic only that would house the entire artifact collection in a respectful way. I get real disgusted when hearing about Titanic amusement rides, souvenirs such as a model that will sink in a bathtub, people getting married on the bow in a sub, etc.

One last thing. I 've said this before in a different thread but what I remember most from the Seattle exhibition is the actual remains of the ships wheel housed in a preservation tank. Amazing!
 
W

William Barr

Guest
Only one interesting footnote from the promoted June 16th presentation of return to the Titanic on NG.

(Which btw was repeated several times from it's first time aired a week ago. It begs the question why was tonight hyped as if it were going to be different or updated?)

James Cameron's movie footage was cut out of the historical accounts from a week ago.
 
Oct 23, 2000
397
4
263
Thank you, Ken, for your reply to my query re: that wreck painting of yours.

And on what Mr. Barr had to say...

"James Cameron's movie footage was cut out of the historical accounts from a week ago."

Hmmmm...makes sense, but if I am asked to elaborate, I'll reply at the Titanic film section of this site.
Which reminds me: my only quibble with Bob on this third visit of his to Big T's wreck site is a quip related to Mr. DiCaprio on Big T's bow when they were flying the underwater robot at that part of the ship. (Sigh!) I know Bob is a great joker and, unlike me (natch, LOL) likes Mr. Cameron's movie.... but somebody should have strapped him in a chair and made him watch "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" and "Catch Me If You Can" ten times each for that all the same! LOL :)

Richard
 

Sean Hankins

Member
May 15, 2004
110
1
183
Hi John,

The Museum I work at in Florida just had RMS Titanic Inc's "A" exhibit which is the one with the big piece. That exhibit left on May 31st headed for Philadelphia PA minus the "Big Piece". It's going back into conservation.
 

Scott Newman

Member
Jun 16, 2004
184
2
183
John,

Great points about the souvenirs...I think I'll make a new thread on this topic tomorrow...What types of Titanic souvenirs are most appropriate? Artwork? Books? Replicas? Models? Or are all of these souvenirs good? I personally enjoy purchasing books. I learn so much about the history of the ship. I don't care so much about replicas of "The Heart of The Ocean"...that's just plain silly.

Scott
 

John Melish

Member
May 17, 2004
31
0
156
Hello Sean,

That must be quite an experience working at a Museum with one of those exhibitions. Do you know long the Big Piece will be in conservation?

Hello Scott,

One of my favorite books is "Anatomy of Titanic" but I have to say without a doubt, my favorite is GOTA.
As far as artwork, Ken Marschall's paintings are incredible. I don't know how he does it but I cannot believe how life-like they are.

I agree with you on "The Heart of the Ocean". Ridiculous. I was looking on E-Bay the other day and came across Titanic beanie bears. Totally tasteless in my opinion.

I just purchased one of those Franklin Mint Titanic models on Ebay. It should be here any day. I cannot wait.
 

Scott Newman

Member
Jun 16, 2004
184
2
183
John,

You're right about GOTA...it's a great book. I really enjoy it. I also enjoy "Titanic: An Illustrated History". Ken can obviously be thanked for those books, as well as Don Lynch. Those two are the smartest Titanic Historians I know...and I'm not just saying that because Ken participates at this site...;)

Franklin Mint? I haven't heard of it. I just got into model making however, so I'll have to check it out!

Scott
 

Similar threads

Similar threads