Dr O'Loughlin

Mark Baber

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Here are two articles I recently stumbled across in the microfilms. I've written to St. Vincent's to try to find out if this plaque still exists. I'll report back once I've heard from them.

MAB


The New York Times, 6 February 1914

DR. O'LOUGHLIN MEMORIAL
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New Hospital Emergency Ward to Bear Name of Titanic's Surgeon
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An emergency ward in St. Vincent's Hospital containing seventeen beds, with a treatment room adjoining, will be dedicated on Feb. 16 to the memory of Dr. W. F. N. O'Loughlin, the surgeon of the Titanic. In the absence of Cardinal Farley, who sails for the Bahamas to-morrow, the dedication service will be conducted by Mgr. Lavelle.

Dr. O'Loughlin went straight from the University of Dublin to the White Star Line in 1870 and remained with the company to the end. During his long career he made many friends in New York who formed a committee, with Thomas Hughes Kelly as treasurer, to put up some monument to perpetuate his memory. Dr. O'Loughlin was well known in the neighborhood of St. Vincent's Hospital, and in the institution itself the new hospital ward was decided upon as the best memorial. A bronze tablet inscribed with his name will be placed in the hall outside the ward facing the small chapel where the sisters meet to go through their daily spiritual exercises.


The New York Times, 17 February 1914

HONOR TITANIC'S SURGEON
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A new emergency ward in St. Vincent's Hospital, equipped and furnished throughout as a memorial to Dr. Francis Norman O'Loughlin, the senior ship surgeon of the White Star Line, who perished in the disaster to the Titanic, was dedicated yesterday to the use of disabled seamen. The ward is on the ground floor, off the entrance on Eleventh Street, near Seventh Avenue. It consists of three separate rooms, one for general usage containing nine beds, one with three beds for patients in delirium, and the third with five beds to provide for an overflow or for women patients when necessary.

The committee in charge of erecting a memorial to Dr. O'Loughlin began its work shortly after the sinking of the Titanic. The memorial, as proposed originally, consisted of a laboratory to be erected on the roof of St. Vincent's, but this not complying with the requirements of the Building Bureau, it was decided to equip an emergency ward. St. Vincent's was selected for this purpose because it receives the majority of injured seamen and was the hospital at which Dr. O'Loughlin was a constant visitor in attendance on sailors. At yesterday's exercises Dr. Edward C. Titus, for many years an associate of Dr. O'Loughlin, said:

"Dr. O'Loughlin, whose memory we perpetuate, as (sic; "was"?) a ship surgeon for forty years. He was a constant visitor at this hospital, in caring for his ship's injured sailors. Not more than a month before his death he said to me, 'If I die on land, I hope that my burial will be in peace, but by all that is fitting I should be wrapped in a sack and sunk in the sea which I have traveled for forty years.'"

While the dedication ceremonies were in progress Angello Grillo, a ship rigger, was brought to the hospital suffering from internal injuries resulting from a fall from a mast derrick on a pier. There were eight sailors in the hospital yesterday.

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John M. Feeney

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Sep 20, 2000
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Mark: Great finds, those! I'd never heard of this memorial either, and it's nice to know that the good doctor was so commemorated. (Some excellent background on the man, as well.)

Good luck with Saint Vincent's! And thanks -- as usual, a superb contribution.

Cheers,
John.
 
C

Cassandra Crowther

Guest
Dear Mark,
How wonderful to know that Dr. O'Laughlin was honored in such a wonderful way! Imagine, being a ship's doctor for all those years-- it really is impressive.
 
A

Andrew Williams

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Congratulations Mark!

Well done this is an excellent discovery. If this memorial does survive at St. Vincent's then have you thought about notifying Brian Ticehurst in Britain.

Brian does a beautiful book which is constantly being update and dedicate to the Titanic Memorials World-wide.

Best wishes

Andrew W.
 

Mark Baber

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>have you thought about notifying Brian Ticehurst in Britain

Brian is a member of one of the mailing lists where I posted this information when I posted it here, and responded on that list with a lengthy post about Dr. O'L. If/when I find out if the plaque still exists, he'll know about it, both through that list and through a private email.

MAB
 
Jan 26, 2012
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Mark,

I know it's been 10 years since this post, but I'm very interested to know, did you ever find out about the plaque was still there? I believe it may be to late to try and find out now as St Vincent's has closed down.
 

John Lamoreau

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May 21, 2004
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Josefine,

I saw this post and wanted to let you know that I have obtained the plaque. It was quite a search. But it is safe. I have pictures if your are interested.
Sincerely,

John
Mark,

I know it's been 10 years since this post, but I'm very interested to know, did you ever find out about the plaque was still there? I believe it may be to late to try and find out now as St Vincent's has closed down.
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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That's great news, John! What do you plan to do with it? Care to post a photo here?
 

John Lamoreau

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May 21, 2004
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Here is a picture...

Mark, I host an annul Titanic Dinner. I plan to have it on display at next year's dinner. This is a spectacular item. It belongs in a museum. I have put a yard stick on it to give you an idea of dimensions. It is 51 1/2 inches wide and 38 1/2 inches tall. It weighs approximately 200 pounds.

IMG_2150 a.jpg
 

John Lamoreau

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May 21, 2004
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Terrific, John. Thanks.
Mark, This plaque belongs in a museum where more people can see it. I have been contacted by the good Doctor’s hometown where no memorial for him exists. That might be a good place. But I am very open on where it should go.