EDeck Cabins


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Richard Coplen

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Hey all,
having read Daniel Klistorner's excellent article on Margaret Brown's cabin which put forward the convincing theory that she was in fact an occupant of an E-Deck cabin and not B-Deck, I can't help but wonder what exactly the first-class cabins on E-Deck looked like. I vaguely recall seeing a photo of a cabin from D- or E-Deck in Bob Ballard's "Discovery of the Titanic". However, it did'nt look all that luxurious, especially when compared to the cabins on A-, B- and C-Decks. In fact it looked more like a second-class cabin. The bed shown in the photo had a plain, white metal frame and was covered in neat white bed-linen, it looked very clinical - as if it belonged in a hospital. The engine-noise here would have been much greater. Were the cabins on D- and E-Deck much plainer? Were they intended for the more economical first-class traveller? Being cheaper than the upper deck cabins - why were so many wealthy notables like Margaret Brown opting for them when they could've afforded better. I have seen countless numbers of photos of cabins from A-, B- and C-Decks, and little or none of those on D- and E-Decks. I'd greatly appreciate your theories/ideas! Thanks a million!
Richie.
 
Richard,

I was actually going to recreate Molly's cabin, I was going to make a model of it to use a more or less accurate picture of a cabin with the article. However due to some "accidental" (not on my part) throwing out of "rubbish" I was unmotivated, greatly disappointed and did not finish the model. I still have the bed and some paneling I did, and may finish it in the future (however see my sketch in the Molly's cabin discussion).

One incorrect impression people get is that all first class cabins were covered in gold, marble and expensive wood! This is not the case for all cabins. Only the larger suites on B and C deck were (even then not all of them, only some cabins were decorated in elaborate period styles). However the rest of the accommodation in 1st class was humbler. A, B, C, D and E deck were very similar. The paneling was all the same, it's the furniture that varied.

The photo of the E deck cabin from Ballard's book is from Olympic, which was taken on April 2, 1931 (or 1933 - I can't remember). These photos are completely irrelevant to Titanic in 1912, as Olympic's interiors were altered and changed throughout it's life.

In fact, the entire E deck could be used as 2nd class accommodation, however generally the forward area was almost permanently always used for 1st class. The cabins thus in 2nd class were very similar to 1st. The differences were hot and hold water supplies, and having your own heater. As well of course as having access to the better first class facilities etc.

Daniel.
 
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Richard Coplen

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Daniel,
you say all the paneling was the same, but did'nt it vary from deck to deck? I mean the paneling on A-Deck was different to that on B and C-Decks. I knew that the Ballard cabin photo was a 1930's one aboard the Olympic, however the furnishings don't seem to have changed that much. The marble wash-stand; electric-heater and the large couch are absolutely identical to similar features on the Titanic. I'm of the opinion that there were two types of 1st class cabin - the deluxe staterooms and the more basic, economical cabins. I think those situated on A-, B- and C-Decks were the more luxurious while those on D- and E-Decks were the more plainer, cheaper options. It says something when you consider that the more wealthy, affluent people aboard like the Astors, Strausses, Duff-Gordons and Guggenheim party occupied A-, B- and C-Deck cabins while the lesser-known and perhaps less wealthy people such as the Harders, Speddens, Newells and such occupied D- and E-Deck cabins. Just a thought!
Richard.
 
Richard,

The paneling in the cabins on A deck was no different to the simpler cabins on B, C, D and E decks. The only cabins to have different paneling and styles were the large cabins on B and C decks aft of the fore grand staircase. All the cabins on all decks for of the staircase basically looked the same (paneling-wise). The difference was in the variety of furniture used and carpet on the floor. Col Gracies C52 would have looked no different than Anderson's E12.

As for the 1930's photo, that type of wash-stand would not have been found on E deck at all in 1912 on Titanic or Olympic. Neither would the heater be there (at least not in that particular cabin). Basically the only thing that remained in that cabin from the earlier days was the sofa (and the chest of drawers and wardrobe - which are not visible in the photo).

Regards,

Daniel.
 
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