Edgar Joseph Meyer


Dec 31, 2000
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Oh Jan,

Would you please give us the link to your site of wonderful works please and thank you. Kah-leen, wait until you see some of the stuff he's been working on. Very ambitious man he is.

Beverly
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Dec 12, 1999
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I found one more on-line photograph. It's of the Meyer family's residence in San Francisco. Edgar grew up here. As noted in the article, "Iceberg at the Golden Gate," the Meyer family left San Francisco in 1893, when Eugene, Sr., got a job at Lazard Freres investment banking house in New York. Older sisters Rosalie and Elise stayed behind, and married Sigmund and Abraham Stern, the president and chief operating officers of Levi, Strauss & Co.http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/arthomes/figures/I0026388B.jpg
 

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Robert J. Meyer

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I just got an eerie feeling looking at the picture of the kids on the hammock!...My son Robert III, is the twin to Walter Meyer!
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Robert,
Not to embellish on the eerieness of it all, but here's another photo of Walter Meyer.http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/bluelakes/figures/I0032639A.jpg
I would like get some feedback from you on the "Iceberg at the Golden Gate" article (see main page), which has a lot about the Meyer family in it. Do you have any knowledge about the Stern family, located in San Francisco? Thanks.
 

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Robert J. Meyer

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Jan,

You were right! That picture was even better! I will post a picture of my son tomorrow...you will be amazed at the similarities!

I read your article...it was EXCELLENT!...bravo!
I have known for a few years now about Edgar Meyer, and have researched my family back to 1845...there is NO trace of joint history. My family have been in the Newark, NJ area from 1845 on. And no, I cannot help you with the Stern family at all. Its interesting though that a few of my family generations have worked in the Macy's building in Newark, NJ...actually going back a few decades...it was Bambergers...before being bought by Macy's.

I find all the threads here to be absolutely fascinating!...I am learning more every day!

God Bless and keep up the great job!
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Here's a photograph of the Campanile at the University of California's Berkeley campus.
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I visited the famous Bancroft Library on the campus, which is very near the Campanile. Bancroft is a top-notch research facility, with an incredible collection of materials. Here's a photograph of the entrance.
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Interestingly, the research I did today buttressed the thesis of my article "Iceberg At The Golden Gate." It appears that Edgar Meyer, and his sister's family, the Sterns, in San Francisco, including in particular Edgar's niece, Elise Stern, were very close. There were photographs of Edgar taking Elise skating in Central Park. Elise had written in pencil on the back: "I really loved it when Uncle Edgar took me skating." There were other pictures of Edgar holding Elise. Elise is referred as "Bab" on the back of the photograph. Other photographs depict Edgar visiting Elise and another relative in Burlingame (near San Francisco). He is shown hugging the children, and under his picture is written "Uncle Edgar." Elise had taken pictures of the May 6, 1908 arrival of the Great White Fleet in San Francisco. She and her family went aboard the U.S.S. Nebraska for a tour. On May 7, 1908, there was a big parade. San Francisco was all decked out in patriotic style, with flags draped on the Ferry building. There are many excellent photographs of Edgar in the collection. There was a nice large portrait of Edgar with "Lost On the Titanic" written on the back. Another album had a small picture of Edgar's daughter.

However, the photos are quite expensive to order. It was very strange to review the old family albums --- like delving into the personal lives of people, and finding out that when you see their innermost, personal sides, they are much like you and your own family. Edgar's name was Edgar Joseph Meyer. He was named after grandfather, Joseph Newmark. Elise was the only child of Edgar's sister, Rosalie. His other sister, Elise Hortensa Stern, had married Abraham Stern, Sigmund's brother. Abraham apparently died. Then, Elise married some Brazialian ambassador, named De Souza Dautre. There was a note to Elise from U.S. Supreme Court Justice, Felix Frankfurter. When I was ordering copies of pictures I told the librarian, "You know, these are extremely valuable pictures." She just ignored it and said: "Well, you know, they say that once they're in a museum they aren't worth anything."

(Message edited by jcnielsen on April 6, 2002)

(Message edited by jcnielsen on April 6, 2002)
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Has anyone heard of an "E. Pillsbury"? I know that the Marvins were related to the Pillsbury family in Minnesota -- but this one is in San Francisco.
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 26, 2000
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Glad to be of help.

If you ever get a chance to see "Hannah and Her Sisters", I believe Hannah's apartment is in this same building, by the way.

Best regards,
Cook
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Does anyone know what happened to Edgar Meyer's daughter? She was barely one year old. I have her baby picture. But, I wanted to mention something about her in my ET article.

This article is turning out to be quite interesting. I've uncovered some extraordinary facts. As soon as I gain permission to publish the photos, and with Phil's permission, I intend to post the article.
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Well, I'm putting the finishing touches to "Edgar Joseph Meyer: Lost on Titanic" --- this article promises to be one of my most controversial yet . . . A man hanged by a mob in Atlanta . . . an infamous French Captain -- all figure in to the story. There's a lesson, a moral, about Edgar's death. Too many articles on this site are technical, lackluster, cutesy soap opera-ish, and "safe." Nobody reads them; nobody cares. Some of the authors even apologize, in advance, for being perceived as raising a stink about some accepted principle, or view. That type of research doesn't further anything, but sleep. If any of you are so lucky as to get to read "Edgar Joseph Meyer -- Lost on Titanic," you may find it necessary to drop what you are doing, think about what you have read . . . maybe even shed a couple of tears, in passing. It is a moving, touching story with a deep underlying message.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>That type of research doesn't further anything, but sleep<<

A matter of perspective, Jan. Quite a few of us old salts find technical forensics issues quite interesting, and there is nothing that can be called "safe" about the sort of ground that's been explored by David Brown and Parks Stephenson, and which quite a few of us here continue to explore.

Nor can it be said that there's anything "safe" about exploring any aspect of the ever notorious Californian Incident which has been explored and published about by such as George Behe, Dave Bilnitzer, Dave Gittins, Tracy Smith, Erik Wood, and myself. Nobody can publish on that without drawing a helluva lot of flak regardless of what "side" they take. We've all learned this the hard way.

Having said that much, this isn't exactly everybody's cup of tea. While some of us find such research fascinating, others won't, and there's nothing wrong with that. The people involved sometimes tend to vanish from the scene or are remembered only by way of stereotypical mythmaking that goes right back to 1912. The kind of research you've been doing goes beyond that and is just as important.

Come to think of it, all of it is. Good luck with your article.
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Fair enough . . . Michael, actually, I think the membership will like this article on Edgar Meyer. He was a man who had so much to live for. I've tried, very hard, to find some sort of lesson, or meaning, for humanity from his death. In a way, Edgar, along with others on the Titanic, kind of remind me of heroes . . . as the renown French sculptor Auguste Rodin portrayed heroes. If you have seen his sculpture, "The Burghers of Calias," it says a lot. If you look at the faces of people pictured on this site, none of them look particularly heroic. Like the "Burghers," they are ordinary people, caught up in events not under their control, making sacrifices, looking confused, scared, doubting and uncertain . . . yet, they are heroes.
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Jan,

Surely you jest when you intimate that you can be controversial
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. But never mind - the subject determines the way it's approached. The Meyers have naturally interested me as they were shipboard mates of the Duff Gordons. I've always felt sad for Edgar because of what he wrote in Lucy's autograph book that last night. He seems to have had zest and a sense of humor - and a lot of hopes and dreams.

Congratulations on the completion of your article and I look forward to reading it and learning more about this enigmatic character.

Randy
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>If you look at the faces of people pictured on this site, none of them look particularly heroic. Like the "Burghers," they are ordinary people, caught up in events not under their control, making sacrifices, looking confused, scared, doubting and uncertain . . . yet, they are heroes.<<

You're right. Quite a few of them are. They didn't start out that way. They just wanted to get to the other side of the pond, but then they got blindsided by the unexpected when things went horribly wrong. When it did, they each accated according to their gifts. When you get down to it, that's really all anyone can ask for.

>>...actually, I think the membership will like this article on Edgar Meyer.<<

Hay, anyone who can get a lynch mob gunning for him can't be all bad!
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I'll be looking forward to what you have to say about him.
 
Jun 4, 2003
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In the first thread above, Lucile's valuables and some clothing appear to have survived. Does anyone else have any other info on these things, except for the silk kimono we have the chance to see in ET? Thanks!
 

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