Edith Corse Evans


Feb 25, 2007
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One of the four first-class women who died on the Titanic, Edith Corse Evans it is, probably, the dead woman floating at the lounge! Does anyone agree?
 
Oct 15, 2006
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It is a possibility but I think we saw Miss Evans before in the movie. When Jack, Rose, Fabrizio and Tony arrived on Boat Deck from the Second Class entrance, Rose talked with Colonel Gracie and he is accompanied by two woman. I always think that these two women were Mrs Brown and Miss Evans.
 
Feb 25, 2007
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you´re right, I didn´t rebember that!
..but I always want to "give" an history to that woman..could be the Allison woman too, isn´t it?
 
Oct 15, 2006
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For the woman in the lounge, I considered she is too young to be one of the 4 first class women who died. Mrs Straus was 63 years old, Miss Isham 50 years old, Miss Evans 30 years old(And, according to Gracie, she might have hid her deception to not enter in a lifeboat in rejoining the poop deck) Mrs Allison could be the woman but she was last seen on A deck promenade if I remember correctly with Mr Allison and Loraine. But, I always considered the woman in the lounge as Mrs Lucy Violet Snape, one of the second class stewardess who died in the sinking. She was 22 years old and maybe Cameron think she could have helped some of the passengers to enter in the starboard lifeboats who were partly loaded from A deck. Then, she would have to pass by the first class section and maybe after all her passengers were left, she remained in the lounge.
 
Oct 15, 2006
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It's nothing and remember, it is only speculation...Nobody really know what Mrs Snape really did this night but as I think her story is quite sad, I thin she desearve to appear in a movie(as the 2200 others people who were on Titanic) and I concluded she could be the lounge woman...
 
Feb 25, 2007
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But even as speculation it is very special to give an history to all those caracteres...
Make they seem more important to someone that loves the movie and the real Titanic history!
 
Oct 15, 2006
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Ah yes you have reason...I did not remeber how look the dress. Then, I don't know who she could be. I think that this type of lingerie dress was only worn by rich lady no?(And it could not be Miss Evans...In the scene with Gracie, she wore a black gown)
 
May 3, 2005
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A pox on all you people on Encyclopedia Titanica and Nitpickers !!!!!!!!!....I keep going back to my DVD to find all the stuff of which you come up with.

Seriously....thanks to all :)
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The woman seems to be in her night clothing. More effective visually than a heavy overcoat and stout boots! This scene follows on directly, if I remember right, from Father Byles telling us that the former world has passed away, no more tears etc. So you could take that rather angelic image as allegorical of a spirit rising to heaven, but It's not likely it was intended to reveal the fate of any particular person. It serves rather as a pointer to the impending fate of many.
 
Sep 1, 2004
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Yes, exactly, Bob, I think he same. And by the way, even if the scene is actually frightening, it looks so beautifully, with the flowing dress and the chandelier behind her.

Jonathan: It is a night dress, the woman does not even have shoes on, so she could wear slipper before she was trapped in the flooding lounge. And she has not the hair done.

Regards
Vitezslav Ivicic
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Consider, too, gentlemen, that at this point of the movie, members of every class are running all over the ship, so who is to say that the woman is/was from first class? Yes, the dress looks elegant, BUT . . . this might be a nightgown that simply looks elegant in the illumination of the light. It sure looks like a nightgown to me, AND, as heart-wrenching as it is to think about it, she looks like a teenager, maybe between 14 and 18 years old. She could be a 2nd-C girl.

That makes me wonder why anyone would have been wearing anything elegant at that time of night, even the men in their tuxes. It was after 11 p.m., and most of the passengers had been in bed when the ship scraped the iceberg.

Just my input anyway.
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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Mark, there were a handful of passengers who were in evening wear - Dorothy Gibson and her cardplaying companions, the men in the smoking room. It's also been written that some women were only in their nightclothes (Robert Daniel and Mrs. Clark, for example), but I wonder how true this is - how hard is it to throw a coat over your pajamas, after all?

I do agree with you though that nothing says that billowy nightgown the girl was wearing had to be of high quality.
 
S

sashka pozzetti

Guest
Lucile was wearing a kimono style bathrobe, and a nightie. I have often wondered why she didn't put something warmer on, even just to go out on deck. Her maid threw on a whole selection of different clothes. maybe she was thinking about not being able to afford losing them, while Lucile didn't care?
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Would YOU get fully dressed - gown, hat, gloves, stockings, corset, overcoat - when you're fully expecting to return to bed in ten minutes? I wouldn't. And, once I'd realised that time was of the essence, nor would I linger to co-ordinate accessories. A shipwreck is presumably not the best occasion on which to cut a sartorial dash.

Laura Francatelli was indeed a secretary but she would not have been on the 1912 equivalent of the minimum wage, so I doubt she worried too much about replenishing her wardrobe, once back on dry land. Besides, around midnight on April 14/15, she must have had other things on her mind.

On the other hand...I've always been intrigued by that famous picture of the Harders condoling with Mrs Hays on the 'Carpathia'. In her natty hobble-skirted suit, feathered toque and high-button boots, Mrs Harder looks very chic. Evidently, some passengers really DID make the effort to look the part that night.

I've often wondered how many of the first-class ladies (besides Dorothy Gibson) were actually still in their evening gowns at the time of the collision. Not many, I should think, as most of the female passengers had retired to bed by 11.40PM. Although it's possible that, once back in their staterooms, some didn't change into night-attire straight-away.

I was puzzled by the decision to dress Kathy Bates in a kind of mauve chiffon negligee (complete with pretty necklace) during the sinking sequence. We know exactly what Mrs Brown was wearing that night - a black velvet suit with striped lapels, plus furs - so I wonder why she wasn't more accurately clothed in the film?
 

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