Edith Evans

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Glenda Bowling

Guest
Jack,
Phil Gowan is the owner of the photo of Edith Evans in question and plans to publish it and others in a biographical book in the not too distant future.
He went to extraordinary lengths to find it several years ago and it was thought to be the only one that existed. More recently, though, he found the motherlode of Evans family photos and now owns the originals and also has a painting of her done for her mother on her 15th birthday. As Grant has pointed out,that would have been 116 years ago. I've seen scans of the painting and a photo of her at 15 that is very similar to the painting. And I've seen the original of her at the approximate age of 34. It is stunning. She was a classy woman. You'll be able to see the painting next year for sure as it is going to be published in one of the Titanic quarterlies but I can't remember which one.

I hope this answers some of your questions.

Glenda B
 
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Lynda Franklin

Guest
What a nice picy of Edith any chance we have of seeing the whole face ? In a book or even a magazine ?
 
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Timothy Trower

Guest
I doubt that Phil will even see these most recent postings ... but I've seen two of the pictures of Edith Evans as well as the painting done of her at age 15, and when they are published you will not be disappointed.
 

Kerry Clare

Member
Apr 5, 2007
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There is one photo of Edith Evans but it hasn't been made public yet--it will be in a book that Brian Meister and I are collaborating on
Has this book been published yet, and if so what are the details please?
 
Mar 20, 2007
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How wonderful. Thank you so much for posting that article, Michael. It is fantastic to lay eyes upon the elusive Miss Evans at last. The article concerning the endowment of the church organ by the Evans sisters can be found in the archives of The New York Times. I stumbled across the full text during my own internet meanderings last year but foolishly neglected to take the date and page references.

Re-reading Archibald Gracie's very lucid account, it is clear that he did not in fact know Edith personally before the voyage, and was only introduced to her by the Lamson sisters when the ship was sinking. I don't have my copy of Gracie's text in front of me as I type this - but I recall quite clearly that he states that he missed Edith's name upon their initial meeting and had to ask her to repeat it to him at a very late stage, when the situation on the sloping Boat Deck was becoming increasingly precarious. So, however Edith was spending her time between 10th-14th April, her activities did not bring her into contact with this most gregarious of men.

There has been endless speculation on this forum as to why Edith did not enter Collapsible D with Mrs Brown. It has been posited that she may have worn a modish and restrictive hobble-skirt which prevented her from negotiating the gap between deck and boat. This is certainly a possibility. However, I've come to believe that, without any active intent on the part of the men in charge of the loading process, and in their haste to get the collapsible safely away, Edith's presence in the waiting throng was simply and conveniently 'overlooked' - understandable, given that the Titanic was about to founder, but not a fact to be easily reconciled with the myths of selfless male gallantry perpetuated that night (only think of Steffanson and Woolner leaping into two empty spaces a matter of seconds later!)

One way or another, I suppose we will never know.
 

Mike Poirier

Member
Dec 31, 2004
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Hello Martin-

I am so glad you enjoyed the article and the portrait. Yes, it was nice to see her in print for the first time. I always felt Lightoller was being less than honest when Gracie supposedly questioned him. What did become of those other women that from Gracie's account, followed Mrs. Brown and Miss Evans to the boat. No doubt they would have been behind the two all the way. One would think they were all left behind and told to wait for collapsible B.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Yes, that seems very likely to me too, Michael. Who knows - maybe Bess Allison, and little Lorraine, were somewhere in that throng around Collapsible B?

Whilst I realise that Lightoller and his team had more than a little on their plates by 2.10, I've never been convinced by their apparent inability to shed light on Edith Evans' failure to enter Collapsible D. Either she tried to board or she didn't. Hobble-skirt or no hobble-skirt, if she was indeed showing willing, then surely somebody could have given her a handy shove, such as landed Molly Brown in Lifeboat No. 6 an hour or so earlier?

Based on the evidence, and my own understanding of human nature, I've concluded that Edith was simply pushed back - by an increasingly panicky somebody - when she tried to follow her companion to safety.
 

Mike Poirier

Member
Dec 31, 2004
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Hi Martin

I am so glad you enjoyed the article. It was nice to finally see her face in print for the first time after all these years. Yes, I am still pondering those other women that supposedly followed Mrs. Brown and Miss Evans. If that is true- then Miss Evans was not the only woman left on deck.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Update: our regular address http://titanicinternationalsociety.org/
is now active with the new easy-to-read and more versatile format and this article is accessible now at that link as well. VOYAGE feature articles and interviews will appear about every month and an update on what is coming out in the next edition.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Typical! One waits for years for a picture of Edith Evans to make it into the public domain - and then two come along at once.

I suppose it is too much to hope that the 1909 photograph will appear online at some not-too-distant point in the future?
 

Mike Poirier

Member
Dec 31, 2004
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Yes Martin, it is amazing that June and Sept have brought out pictures of Edith. I hope THS puts up a copy of their article as well in the near future.