Edwardian Era Films

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sharon rutman

Guest
One thing always puzzled me about Somewhere in Time--if Christopher Reeve's character wore the wrong type of suit, how could he have successfully travelled back in time to l9l2? Also, there's the question of the l979 penny hidden in some secret compartment of the suit. I thought everything had be accurate down to the last detail to make the time travel trip work properly. Hmmm.
 
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Kevin Spaans

Guest
Hi Shelley,

I too am a great fan of the Gilded Age and am always looking for new period movies, so this list comes as a great help! However my personal favorite movie, Ragtime (1981), is missing. So there's one to add!

All the best,
Kevin Spaans
 
Apr 11, 2001
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The suit was not a problem because, as Elise notes, it was at least ten years out of date, therefore it did exist in 1902 so it could still exist in 1912. The penny which Richard overlooks when he begins his quest for time travel is inadvertantly left in his coin pocket. Notice when he goes into his closet in 1979, he removes the change and puts it on a shelf. The penny is left inside. It is because he sees the penny back in 1912 that his mental hold on his 1912 reality fails and he falls back through time before her very eyes. As Dr. Finney relates at the beginning in his chat with Richard at Mayfield College- his journey back to medieval Italy was brief- "How could it be otherwise-the present was all around me, ..." The real anomaly was the watch- it was suggested by Matheson that the old Elise appear in 1979 and give it to him. The director was so enamoured of the idea he filmed it before they saw the obvious time loop- how did Elise get the watch if he had not yet traveled back? It got to be such a cast in-joke that they wore Teeshirts with "Ask me about the watch" on the back. In the novel version, BID TIME RETURN, the watch is given to Richard by Elise in the novel setting of 1896 so there is no conflict.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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The Bostonians (with Chris Reeve)An Ideal Husband,(Minnie Driver) and television mini-series with Richard Jordan, "Captains and Kings" are also missing. The list is growing! Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest" is still around in some theatres -starring Colin Firth and Rupert Everett (two reasons alone to go see this!), Judi Dench and Reese Witherspoon. The costumes are divine.
 

Kris Muhvic

Member
Sep 26, 2008
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Is Blockbuster closed yet....!

Thank you for that! I wish to add two of my Gilded Age films to the list, if anyone is interested:

"Picnic at Hanging Rock" & "Photograghing Fairies".

They were not big, popular films, "Picnic..." was an Australian film from about '75, has a bit of a cult following I understand. "Photographing...", more recent '99(?), and captivating! Both are based (I know, that's a tricky word) on actual events.

Yours-
Kris
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Kris, Picnic at Hanging Rock has been on TV recently and it was riveting! I wonder if your second film is the same as one called FAIRYTALE, which was about the famous Cottingly, England sisters who faked photos of fairies in the woods-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle even became involved in this one. The girls finally confessed when they became old ladies that it was a huge hoax. All England was a-buzz. This was in 1917 and a hair late to be Edwardian, but the gullibilty of the time is remarkable.
http://www.fairytalemovie.com/
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Oh Shelley, no! why do you try to wipe away the last remnants of my childhood by telling us that fairies don't exist! Kindly explain just who it was that slipped a silver sixpence under my pillow each time I shed one of my little teeth. Mrs.W. claims it wasn't her (at least, since we've been married anyway!) so who does that leave? Oh no! it can't have been Cook.....can it?
 
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Curly Locks- I do believe-I do, I DO! Now let's see Nanny and she will give us each a digestive biscuit and orange squash in the nursery and I will tell you about that egg-bearing bunny and the man in the red suit. Returning to our regularly scheduled programme... Jewel in the Crown, Mary Poppins and and Pollyanna can make the list. Some great costumes in both the Disneys. Disney had a field day with gilded age flicks.
 

Don Tweed

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Mar 30, 2006
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Hey Shelly, I got one for you!
How about Disneys'"The Aristocats"!!!
Even the horses name in the movie is Frou Frou!!!
-Don
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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I'm so delighted to see that Kris brought up one of my top five favourite flicks - Peter Weir's 'Picnic at Hanging Rock'. The Joan Lindsay novel it's based on is, likewise, an absolutely exquisite evocation of the era, and every bit as hauntingly lyric and eerie as the movie. Was it left off the list because it was set in 1900? The novel was re-issued in hardcover over a decade ago in an edition copiously illustrated with period paintings, advertisments and ephemera such as St Valentine's Day cards.

I was also rather pleased to see 'Michael Collins' on the list, although it's perhaps a bit of a stretch - the opening scenes of the Easter Rising take place in 1916 (of course) and the bulk of the movie takes place during the Irish War of Independence and Irish Civil War (1919 to the assassination of Collins in 1922).

If 'Shackleton' is in there, I put in a vote for 'Scott of the Antarctic' - or even '90 Degrees South'.