Edwardian Era Films

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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I'm reading Richard Matheson's book "What Dreams May Come" now, and I see that there's a movie that goes with this book, too. I'm planning to rent it as soon as I finish the book. Has anyone here seen the movie?
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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Madame Shelley!

Oh! You could not know this, but when I was about 18, I (along with mom & step-dad) visited Gillete's place! I remember it being a sort of Arts and Crafts gone Crazy thing....remember the fireplace? Made with a million riverstones, with little stone Heads here and there? That and framed stills on the wall. I also vaguely remember a massive desk with some kind of contraptions. Sorry for the explosion of half-remembered details...just that I never thought those memories would be ressurected!

I would love for you to be a guide! Am planning the Newport Tour (does the hotel have a stable where I can crash?!)....Of course, next time you need a Mackinac fix- I'm your man! Well, you know, "unprotected ladies" and all that, wouldn't want you to stumble into the unsavory parts of the mitten state!

Thank you for sharing these wonderful things.... know I appreciate them all!

Yours~
Kris
 
Mar 28, 2002
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What about My Fair Lady with Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison? I skived off work yesterday and saw it on one of the movie channels. I forgot how funny some parts of it are, like when 'Enry 'Iggins introduces Eliza to her first social outing, on the opening day of Royal Ascot. "Young man, what are you sniggering at? I bet I did it proper!" and "..it's my understanding that they done the old girl in...". A priceless scene, culminating in "C'mon Dover! C'mon Dover! C'mon Dover, move yer blooming a***!"

Kris - The Shooting Party. Was this the one with James Mason who ends up getting accidentally shot at the end?

Cheers,

Boz
 
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Bob Cruise

Guest
If you're into happenings overseas, there's "Nicholas and Alexandra", the sad but true tale - set in 1917 - of the last Russian Czar and Czarina (and their five czardines).

There's also "Jules and Jim" - Francois Truffaut's take on a menage a trois, which starts off around 1915 and ends in the early 1930s.

Oh yes - also "The Flame Trees of Thika", an Isak Dinensen-like tale set in Africa starring Hayley Mills.

Wait - Hayley's 13 and living in Harrington, USA - yet at the same time she's 30-something and raising a kid near the Serengeti?

Ahhh - the wonders of the Machine Age!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Rush out to see The Importance of Being Earnest while you can. Oscar Wilde at his 1890's best. Reese Witherspoon and- be still my heart- Colin Firth and Rupert Everett. Costumes and sets to die for. It's hard to find in theatres- Scooby Doo however seem to be going strong everywhere every ten minutes! Moviefone.com can locate a screen near you. Coming NEXT Friday- POSSESSION with Gwennie Paltrow- I actually accidently walked onto the set of this one when it was filming in Whitby, North Yorkshire. Sort of French Lieutenant's Woman meets Somewhere in Time. Our kind of stuff!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Forgot to mention Gosford Park is out on DVD and VCR format- if you do NOT know who Ivor Novello is, check this site out- I am fast becoming his most devoted fan. Matinee idol, pianist, composer, actor par excellence, songwriter, lyricist and crooner to swoon for (all that and gorgeous too)- he was an Edwardian rage who continued though the wars right up until his death in 1951. In my opinion his MOST divine recording was in 1924, "The Land of Make Believe". His catchy hits of 1912, "Blue Eyes" "If", "In the Clouds", "The Little Damozel", "Up There", "Our Help in Ages Past"- the soundtrack of Gosford Park is a must-have. You will be captivated.
http://hometown.aol.com/Novello/Idol.html
 
May 12, 2005
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AND Miss Shell he starred with that quintessence of English beauty, Lily Elsie, in her last 2 plays, The Blue Train (1927) and The Truth Game (1928). He was England's answer to Rudolph Valentino.
 

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
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Shelley, here's one movie that may seem odd for your list, "Tell Them Willie Boy is Here." Susan Clark wore some amazing gowns. There was a brilliant blue one that was so fabulous I couldn't keep my eyes off of it. They just showed the film on AMC this weekend and the costumes were a really nice surprise.

Kyrila
 

Dave Moran

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Apr 23, 2002
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How about ' They Shoot Horses Don't They ' with Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin ( did i spell that ri) and the incomparably great Bruce Dern - set around a dance marathon. It may be set at the time of the depression, it's been some years since I saw it, but I think it gives a great insight into the lengths the poor, hungry and needy would go to just to earn a few bucks. The ending is a knock-out.

Then there's ' The Wild Bunch ' which, IIRC, is set about 1900s in Mexico - a film so great it doesn't need me to go on about it.
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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Shame on me! I forgot to mention one of my all times' film/book: "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn"! The flowers-on-the-desk scene~ I can never recuperate from that one!

Also, remember "The Corn is Green"? I saw the Katherine Hepburn version, I think there's another out there (?).

Iain (Boz)- To tell you the truth, it's been so long since I viewed the "Shooting Party"...only glimpses remain in my memory. Sorry!

Yours-
Kris
 
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Bob Cruise

Guest
Here's a really curious flick: "The Big Broadcast of 1938".

I stumbled upon it because I have always been a fan of W.C. Fields (who got his cinematic start back on 1915 - "Poolsharks").

The film centers on the race between two ships - the "S.S. GIGANTIC" and the "S.S. COLOSSAL" - from NY to Cherbourg.

In it, technology and speed are emphasized - for strictly comic effect - throughout the film.

Ultimately, W.C. speeds - on the GIGANTIC - through a field of icebergs and wins the race!

In a way, it's the exact antithesis of the Titanic saga.

One has to wonder about the author of the original idea - Frederick Hazlett Brennan.

Was there some sort of TITANIC connection/fascination????
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Mention of Titanic was made in the recent British ITV made-for-TV drama Polyanna. Polyanna's aunt, in this case played by Amanda "Silent Witness" Burton told her handyman that she was not about to buy an automobile. "But they're the thing of the future!" he insists. Looking at him with a hint of disbelief, she snaps "You said that about the Titanic".
 
Mar 28, 2002
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What about "A Death In Venice"? I saw a bit of it last night and I'm sure it's set in the Edwardian era. Only saw a bit of it because it gives me the creeps - Venice is not my favourite place!

Cheers,

Boz
 

Leona Nolan

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Dec 17, 2002
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Venice gives you the creeps (I won't ask
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)

Has anyone mentioned 'The Railway Children' and 'The Colour Purple'?????
 
May 12, 2005
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Visconti's "Death in Venice" is set in 1911-12, after the Thomas Mann novel, published in 1912. It's a gorgeous film and one's enjoyment of it can only be marred if one is disturbed by a certain sensitive theme. The cinematography and music are sumptuous and the costuming is "spot on." One of my favorite films.

Other great Edwardian-set movies are "Howard's End" which spans 1910-13 I think, "A Room with a View," which depicts circa 1905, and "Maurice," which has an action date of 1912.

Two others of my faves are datelined post-Edwardian but still retain much of the flavor of that time - "Enchanted April," depicting 1921, and "A Passage to India," set in about 1924.

And Leona is right - "The Color Purple" is magnificent! I believe it starts out around 1911.

These are all MUSTS for lovers of romantic period movies.

Randy
 
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John Meeks

Guest
Nice to see this thread open active again - and very timely...watched "The Importance of Being Ernest" again a few nights ago...wonderful stuff !

Plus, just as a reflection, and with regard to a 'different' aspect of the period, have we ever mentioned "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid", or "The Wild Bunch" ?

Regards,

John M
 
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John Meeks

Guest
Not to mention "The African Queen"....but that might be a little "late"....

John M