Electricity During Sinking


Incony

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first go at new plan, now i know where steps up were, from the image we have. the big white beam is the end support for the store rooms above the generator room.. i cant tell if there is walkway above the mans head... since i see no hand rail there.. that may just be cables going across... but there must be at least two foot between the top of the first ladder and the start of the next to to the switchboard room.. because we can see the handrail for that ladder by the pipes that go all the way fwd to the turbine room bulkhead.. i.e the folded in part of it, under the switchboard room floor central on the centre prop shaft. amazing how dark the switchboard area is... one can see a fall protection grill where the ladder goes into the switchboard room, but very little light coming out of it.. i was hoping to see some handrail evidence.. but cannot.
 

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Keith H

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Keith H. Perseverance strikes lucky... i have found a much better view of the Portside Generators, and now know for certain where stair access was... its a such a good image, must be the original.. it shows the entry right into the switchboard room..and loads of stuff not visible in the images we have seen before... even a crew member standing by the ladder base, which scales the whole image - it means i need to redraw the stair access now.. and it also means there was only one set of stairs since there isnt one shown in the starboard side Titanic - Olympic’s machinery View attachment 75521
Wonderful ,,slowly getting there , there is difference's to drawings , on the plans on this web site shows one set of steeps on the starboard side of the Titanic , also when looking at the pictures of the dynamo switch box's although on the electric platform you can see a bulkhead behind them ,so perhaps not the open platform as first thought ,
 

Keith H

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more investigation reveals the Olympic class, had provision for two more generators if required, aft of the generator room ( in the prop shaft room N.) in trying to calculate the length of the machinery in the generator switchboard room... ( 40 plus feet long, at least 12 foot wide ) i see a lot of unused space for the ( for want of a better word ) "signal lever switching boxes" i calculate they are not more than 5 feet long probably 4 feet.. they too use slate panels and i think they are the same as those on the switchboard, turned sideways, so 18 inch high, two feet long.. hence my guess on the length of the box with two panels in it being about 4 feet.. enough for 5 signal lever mechanisms in each.. but even if the they are five feet long, two of them are only 10 feet long. and with as we see in the images, one single unit in between two, thats only 15 foot total length.. , if the room is 45 foot long, and there is one more signal lever frame for the emergency generators, , so.. thats only half the length of... the generator room... and allows for two more signal lever platforms for more generators if needed.. , but they were not.. so... half the switchboard platform is not being used... its just surplus in case of requirement.. given that space is about 18 foot, by 3 or 4 feet wide or more and with the 5 foot walkway becomes 8 or 9 feet wide.. its a lot of empty space,, certainly room for a staircase, a table, chairs even... storage for documentation, parts etc... ? as far as i figure, one of those signal lever boxes with ten levers was for two generators. ( five levers each ), and all those used do not take up more than half the space allowed..View attachment 75332
from this view we can see there is a bulkhead behind the switch's and also what looks like a doorway on one side , so therefore it seems the switch board room was enclosed.
 

Incony

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from this view we can see there is a bulkhead behind the switch's and also what looks like a doorway on one side , so therefore it seems the switch board room was enclosed. " Keith H the view i share of the switch panel is when it was still in the factory... not on the ship... the only view of the switch panel on we have of it onboard, does not give us the view aft... only starboard... and we know that the meat store overlapped the generator space - above the fresh water tanks by 9 feet... so the starboard end of the switch room is enclosed by that wall... . dont confuse the factory and on board images... :)
 

Incony

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of specific interest to me are the lights we see in the staircase access view of the port side we have now... the ones over generator 4, are - i think, (at least the smaller ones,) actually in the switchboard room. , trying my best to clarify that image, i cannot see a walkway to the equalizer switches, but i can see things sitting vertically on what is the passage way wall, so there may have been access there, i cant discern railings... however, looking at the " guide map " again , i think the equaliser had dedicated access... i share, because i think it shows a hidden ladder. note ive put in the new staircase on the image as well.
 

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Keith H

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Hi yes very interesting , in your photo with the man at the base of the ladder if you look at the line of the ladder it is in line with the dynamo yoke so making the position of the ladder further forward of the electric platform when you are at the top of it .
I have started a 3 D drawing of it all so see how it comes out . I was looking at "Cold starting the Titanic " he talks about access to the emergency generator being from the ladders in the turbine room going up to the dummy funnels.
 

Incony

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Keith H. yes, via the spiral staircase, though it appears on the ships profile and deck maps here, one had to go into the room below the emergency generator room to access the generators, there are no doors or walkways to it ... another bit of nonsense to work out.
 

Incony

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here are the fuses, tube cartridge fuses, in event of a fuse blowing, even if one had the right tube value in ones hand, and had practised changing one as quickly as possible and override the trip, that circuit would go out completely for more than just a flash of light. at least a couple of minutes i think... and that supposes the fault that caused it to break, doesnt exist when you put the new fuse in and override the trip.. if the fault still exists, it blows the new fuse on receiving the short circuit... Given that lights were lit until the very last moments as the break up happened, i think the fuses were over rated, and thus it was the generators that suffered, i dont think that would matter to those folks still there it was a no win situation, no one would be using the generators again, who cares if they are burning out.. also in this image we can see the local fuses. like the ones we can see in the switchboard room image on the meat store wall / panel end. They would blow locally along the deck junction boxes.. so its likely many areas had no lighting or power.. even if the main fuses were still allowing connection. i know for example. that motor vehicle 12 v dc lights can stay lit when the enclosure the bulb is in is full of water... because the ground chassis route is still a better return and shorter path for the current.... Of remark, it suggests the main fuses could have been 500 amp.
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Incony

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Given that 1 main generator could deliver 400KW DC at 100V, it works out at 4000 Amps delivery... one can calculate the requirements at the time of sinking to sense what generators were needed to keep essential light and equipment operational..https://www.rapidtables.com/calc/electric/kW_to_Amp_Calculator.html given that the Titanic had 10,000 lamps,each of @ 16w thats 16000 watts if all the lights were lit. 16 KW? so all the lights needed 160 Amps minimum. given that 1 main genny could supply up to 4000 amps then its not difficult to see that only 1 main genny needed to run to do just about anything at the time of sinking. since the titanic was stopped, ?
 
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Incony

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i think given the lighting, fans, and other electrical gear still functional and even useable at the time the titanic sank, that 500 amp fuses, ( primary fuses for one circuit ) would not be exceeded unless short circuit? . Unless manually overridden , current trips would have operated, and given that lighting was vital to movement and action... i think the current trips were manually overridden, because they could be, and therefore even if the lighting requirement in amps, exceeded the local fuses, and blew those, still the Genny would supply the circuit, even if it no longer was operational... ie lets suppose ( because i don't know ) that an individual lighting circuit per deck was given 100 amp fuse in the switchboard room... even with a local ( lets say 10 amp fuse ) fuse blow, no fuses would blow at the switchboard, unless the whole deck - port or/ and starboard was short circuit to the switchboard.. ? So i don't think switchboard fuses blew, before the cables were severed during break up, there were no big bangs... everything in that room functioned right up until the circuits to the Genny's were severed or short circuit, and steam to the Genny's failed.. ? i think, that any electrical supply at all, at the break up - survived for moments longer to the stern, since those circuits might have remained intact even as steam power failed. Unless and even if one discovers a door out of the switchboard room , at that moment, the transition from light to dark was the end of any escape, i doubt if any one knew the route well enough to negotiate blind in the dark.. even if, in the minutes before, in calm illuminated space, warm, dry, and still in control, they considered it ..
 
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