Emergency Stop in Engine Room?


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Aaron_2016

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There is no way the crankshaft of the compound reciprocating steam engines on Titanic could be damaged. They were massively built with bearings between each crank and at each end. The idea that a piston rod would flex and jam the pistons is just silly. The piston rod is very accurately guided by the crosshead in the slidebars. The piston rod cannot do anything but go up and down perfectly guided.

Cheers,

Julian


Glancing through the newspapers I discovered that defects were found in the Olympic's crankshaft in 1932. Not sure if they were caused by age, or if the liner was put through too much stress e.g an emergency stop. Here are news reports (with emphasis on the damage).


OLYMPIC SAILING CANCELLED
Passengers Offered Accommodation on the Georgic. The White Star Line announced yesterday afternoon that the usual examination of the engine room of the Olympic, after she arrived at Southampton from New York on Friday last, revealed that a small fracture was discovered......

OLYMPIC’S TROUBLE
Owing to an engine defect the sailing of the White Star liner Olympic from Southampton to New York today was cancelled. A small fracture has developed in one of the journals of a crankshaft. It will be repaired in time for her next voyage.....

OLYMPIC'S DEFECTS CONFERENCE WITH SHIPBUILDERS
The White Star Line has issued the following statement regarding the liner Olympic, at present docked in Southampton: There will be a conference on Tuesday at the head offices of the White Star Line......

THE OLYMPIC’S ENGINE TROUBLE
The conference lasted several hours, and at its close the following statement was issued;— “The White Star Line announces the Royal Mail steamship Olympic is to undergo a complete overhaul".....

OLYMPIC TO UNDERGO THREE MONTH OVERHAUL
An order has been placed with Messrs Harland and Wolff for a new propeller shaft for the White Star liner Olympic which is to undergo three months overhaul.....


The following year the Olympic continued to have problems with her engines.


LINER 12 HOURS LATE - OLYMPIC DEVELOPS ENGINE TROUBLE
The White Star liner Olympic reached Plymouth today from New York, 12 hours late owing to engine trouble. Three days ago a defect in a turbine put one of her three propellers out of action and reduced her speed....

OLYMPIC TWELVE HOURS LATE - TROUBLE IN TURBINE
The White Star liner Olympic reached Plymouth yesterday from New York twelve hours late owing to engine trouble.



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Oct 28, 2000
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Metal has lots of properties and fails in many ways. Single events like "crashing back" to avoid an iceberg are less...far less...damaging than the vibrations of everyday operation. There's another kind of vibration built into every engine. This comes from the pulses of power pushing on the piston heads. It's a real killer of modern gasoline engines. And, as if that were not enough, the moving mass of the engine itself would put oscillating loads on the crank bearings, bearing stands, and bed plate of a steam engine.

While Titanic's mains were smooth running and well balanced, every revolution of the crank produced three "pulses" or vibrations from water being compressed between the hull and tip of each blade. At 72 rpms on the engines that's a vibration frequency of 716 cycles per minute. Over the course of a single one-way trip the drive train and engines that more than 6-million vibrations. It is axiomatic in the world of metalworking that vibrations cause metal fatigue. Multiply this by the number of trips Olympic made over the nearly quarter century between being placed in service and discovery of journal cracks and things look quite different. The engines in Titanic's sister seem to have been rather exceedingly well built.

Would anyone out there expect their automobile, washing machine, or other such devices to have a 25 year mean time between failures? Olympic did just that and was still able to be repaired and continue functioning.

-- David G. Brown
 
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coal eater

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Mar 1, 2018
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in normal conditions ship engines will never fail,all depends how much they are being used and how often they are inspected. crash stop would be more dangerous to passengers and crew thought.
 
Dec 13, 2016
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Now I may be mistaken, but I thought the Olympic class engines didn't have a reversing lever the way it is show in James Cameron's movie.
 

Rancor

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Jun 23, 2017
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Here is a model of one of the engines created by Stevefury with the various controls labelled.

e37flkc-png.png


I believe the Fwd/Trim/Rev lever is the reversing control, but you are correct it isn't the massive arm that requires a person to throw their entire body weight on it to move like in the movie.
 
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