K

Kandsmerlin

Member
I'm having a tough time trying to find any detailed plans on the arrangement of the catwalks for both the reciprocating engine room and for the turbine engine room. I'd like to be able to trace the paths to such spaces as the engineer's workshop and the paint stores compartment - both of which are only accessible through the reciprocating engine room.

Can anyone point to any information about how the catwalks are laid out in these two engine compartments?
 
Incony

Incony

Member
it is problematic Kandsmerlin, because even existing maps do not always tell the truth.. one really needs photographic evidence, a phot0 taken at the time, and unedited. then at least one has a reference... and even maps do not always agree with the photographs one can find.. and even the photographers edited photographs to suit their own projection. The Britannic still probably holds the best truth, since it is undisturbed and intact since it sank... but no one is going inside.... .
 
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Seumas

Seumas

Member
it is problematic Kandsmerlin, because even existing maps do not always tell the truth.. one really needs photographic evidence, a phot0 taken at the time, and unedited. then at least one has a reference... and even maps do not always agree with the photographs one can find.. and even the photographers edited photographs to suit their own projection. The Britannic still probably holds the best truth, since it is undisturbed and intact since it sank... but no one is going inside.... .
That's because it's a war grave. Leave it the way it is.
 
K

Kandsmerlin

Member
That's because it's a war grave. Leave it the way it is.
It's hardly a war grave. Everyone made it off the Britannic even though she sank faster than the Titanic did. Only 30 died after one of the lifeboats hit the still spinning propeller. Because she wasn't carrying any war-wounded at the time, she was able to be evacuated much faster.
 
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Kandsmerlin

Member
it is problematic Kandsmerlin, because even existing maps do not always tell the truth.. one really needs photographic evidence, a phot0 taken at the time, and unedited. then at least one has a reference... and even maps do not always agree with the photographs one can find.. and even the photographers edited photographs to suit their own projection. The Britannic still probably holds the best truth, since it is undisturbed and intact since it sank... but no one is going inside.... .
Then the question becomes why hasn't anyone gone into the engine rooms of the wreck of the Britannic? It's not like we don't have the ROV's to do so.
 
Incony

Incony

Member
i dont know Kandsmerlin, because i would really like to see the inside of the generating room, to see if the equaliser cabinet still exists, and where it was and its access.. ... and confirm there was only one staircase from the generators into the control room.. i.e folks had to go down to get out, they could not go up from the control room if they were there.. and the generators flooded..
 
Seumas

Seumas

Member
It's hardly a war grave. Everyone made it off the Britannic even though she sank faster than the Titanic did. Only 30 died after one of the lifeboats hit the still spinning propeller. Because she wasn't carrying any war-wounded at the time, she was able to be evacuated much faster.
Simon Mills views the wreck as such, and thankfully he is the man who owns it. There won't be any penetration of the hull on his watch.

More power to Mr Mills.
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
It's hardly a war grave. Everyone made it off the Britannic even though she sank faster than the Titanic did. Only 30 died after one of the lifeboats hit the still spinning propeller. Because she wasn't carrying any war-wounded at the time, she was able to be evacuated much faster.
The Britannic is in fact an officially designated war grave, by the Greek government. The British government also considers it to be a war grave. Ships sunk during war time, are generally considered as such.
 
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Kandsmerlin

Member
The Britannic is in fact an officially designated war grave, by the Greek government. The British government also considers it to be a war grave. Ships sunk during war time, are generally considered as such.
I didn't know that. I guess ya learn something new every day. I can only hope that one day someone will be allowed to film some of the interior spaces of the Britannic.

Anyways, back to the topic at hand... I'm merely interested in the design of the Olympic-class ships and one of the things that is always annoying is that when looking at the deck plans for the engine rooms, there seems to be some missing details as to the configuration of the catwalks. Now I know that it's mainly due to lack of photography in those spaces but then I see films like James Cameron's "Titanic" where in-particular the scene in the engine room shows men working on the engine and strolling along the catwalks. In another example, another forum member here on this site posted various 360-degree views of various spots in the reciprocating engine room.

I'm curious to know what source material(s) they might have used to draw up detailed scenes such as those.
 
Stephen Carey

Stephen Carey

Member
I'm having a tough time trying to find any detailed plans on the arrangement of the catwalks for both the reciprocating engine room and for the turbine engine room. I'd like to be able to trace the paths to such spaces as the engineer's workshop and the paint stores compartment - both of which are only accessible through the reciprocating engine room.

Can anyone point to any information about how the catwalks are laid out in these two engine compartments?
That's the main problem with the Olympic Class in that there are absolutely no photographs of the engine and boiler rooms - apart from one generator room picture and a murky one from Britannic in build. The reciprocating and boiler rooms seem to be non-existent. There are a few other photos of other ships showing catwalks above the boilers and enginerooms that are on the web. I have copies that I'll send with this mail, but the large file with the engineroom drawings in of Olympic is too big for this portal - not sure if they show much, but as a marine engineer I could fill in where all the ladders and platforms would be, but not necessarily where they actually were. Essentially, each deck was supplied with ladders up to platforms that went round the engines so that you could access them for routine watchkeeping. You then took another ladder up to the next level and so on - and there were doors at each of these levels into either the accommodation or crew areas. In the boiler rooms they would be similar to one of the photos of Mauretania I've included with this post - it was a long way up, hot and probably very sooty... If you'd like to send the areas of the workshop and paint store that you want access for, I can give it a go... Won't be authentic though, but who knows otherwise?
Another problem with the ships is the lack of drawings of the marine systems, but this was common when I first went to sea as an engineer in the 60s - we had to crawl under the plates tracing lines and drawing them in our notebooks which every engineer carried. Wish I'd kept them! The Japanese provided copies of all the marine systems in an A3 format which would have been great back in 1912!
 

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K

Kandsmerlin

Member
That's the main problem with the Olympic Class in that there are absolutely no photographs of the engine and boiler rooms - apart from one generator room picture and a murky one from Britannic in build. The reciprocating and boiler rooms seem to be non-existent. There are a few other photos of other ships showing catwalks above the boilers and enginerooms that are on the web. I have copies that I'll send with this mail, but the large file with the engineroom drawings in of Olympic is too big for this portal - not sure if they show much, but as a marine engineer I could fill in where all the ladders and platforms would be, but not necessarily where they actually were. Essentially, each deck was supplied with ladders up to platforms that went round the engines so that you could access them for routine watchkeeping. You then took another ladder up to the next level and so on - and there were doors at each of these levels into either the accommodation or crew areas. In the boiler rooms they would be similar to one of the photos of Mauretania I've included with this post - it was a long way up, hot and probably very sooty... If you'd like to send the areas of the workshop and paint store that you want access for, I can give it a go... Won't be authentic though, but who knows otherwise?
Another problem with the ships is the lack of drawings of the marine systems, but this was common when I first went to sea as an engineer in the 60s - we had to crawl under the plates tracing lines and drawing them in our notebooks which every engineer carried. Wish I'd kept them! The Japanese provided copies of all the marine systems in an A3 format which would have been great back in 1912!
Yes, please do. Anything that might shed light on the catwalks design and their paths in the engine room is always appreciated. :)
 
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