Engineering Crew

Dec 4, 2000
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We have eyewitness (i.e. "survivor") testimony from both leading stoker Barrett and fireman Beauchamp about events in boiler room #6 after impact. In particular, Beauchamp describes the process of pulling out the fires and quenching them with water. This took about 20 minutes. Then everyone was sent up where the stokers apparently milled about on E deck. From what the two men said, my conclusion is that nobody in boiler room #6 died directly because of impact on the iceberg. This does not mean, however, they survived the night.

--- David G. Brown
 
Nov 14, 2005
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What is your reasoning for this Ioannis? From my understanding there are two who definitely escaped and survived, and the remaning stokers and trimmers were never accounted for?
I think Ioannis meant nobody died in the physical location of boiler rm 6. But like Mr. Brown said there were people from boiler rm 6 that didn't make it after they left.
 
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Bobby Whalen

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Sep 8, 2018
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we know that Barret and Beauchamp and Shepard escaped before the doors closed or they got busy closing the fires. Also, it has been mention that Beauchamp stretches the story. I think I'll rephrase it. If All 3 men escaped after the doors closed . was anyone left behind. We got the testimony and I have 2 different books. In the movie we see men get trapped after the doors are closed. I really appreciate if anyone could help me. All of you thank you for your reply :)
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
The closure of the watertight doors would NOT have hindered escape. There is a ladder on the starboard side, just past the fireman's tunnel which goes up to a catwalk which goes to the port side and from there, loops to the left and up another ladder which would lead right out to Scotland Road on E-Deck.

There is no evidence that anybody died IN Boiler Room Six during the course of or immediately following the accident.
 
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Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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It really annoyed me that in Mr Fellowes stupid soap opera, the firemen left behind conclude "we've had it !". Just the climb the flipping ladder lads !

Also in Cameron's Titianc it looks like there are about twenty or thirty men down there but did Leading Fireman Barrett not testify that there were only about eight firemen, four trimmers, himself and engineer Hesketh in boiler room six at the time of collision ?
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Cameron's film was entertainment, not history. Yes, he and his team did a good job of making things as realistic as possible, but even where he got things dead right, that movie was still not history. Base no historical conclusions on entertainments meant for the popular audience.

-- David G. Brown
 

Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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Cameron's film was entertainment, not history. Yes, he and his team did a good job of making things as realistic as possible, but even where he got things dead right, that movie was still not history. Base no historical conclusions on entertainments meant for the popular audience.

-- David G. Brown
Oh no argument form me there ! I certainly don't regard Cameron's flick as being history.

I though the way Titanic's crew (particularly the stewards) are portrayed as a bunch of bullies was disgraceful.

And then there's Lightoller sounding more like a stereotypical RAF squadron leader c1940 !
 

Rancor

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Jun 23, 2017
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The question was if anyone died in BR 6. The simple answer is no.
While I disagree with the timing it is as David stated.
Not disputing your answer, your knowledge in these matters is beyond question. Just wondering how your reached it. I can't find any sources where it is confirmed that everyone survived the flooding of BR6. I would think a safer answer would be "two survived for sure, the rest we can't know for certain?"
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Barrett left Boiler Room #6 sometime before completion of raking the fires. Beauchamp said that when the order was given to "go up" there was water coming from the bunker behind him and washing over the stoker plates. The exact depth was not mentioned. He said the men went up and milled about on E deck with the men who were to have replaced them. Beauchamp didn't mention any men left behind.

Barrett is a different story. He went int boiler room #5 and worked with engineer Shepherd. That compartment remained dry both above and (apparently) below the stoker plates for some time. Then, after Shepherd fell into the open manhole (breaking his leg) Barrett saw what he called a "rush of water" between the boilers of #5. He escaped to Scotland Road on E deck. While making his escape he noted that the flood water filling the bow had not yet reached the point where it would have overtopped bulkhead E dividing #5 and #6 boiler rooms. This points to the source of his "rush" of water as lower in the hull but we don't know where.

In recent years it has become commonplace to say the "rush" was from a failed bunker door, or even a collapsing bulkhead. Maybe so, but I personally doubt either happened as there is no proof beyond conjecture hardened into the appearance of truth by constant repetition.

There is one probable explanation, but to find it you have to research both Barrett's testimony and the Board of Trade final report; then put together the salient facts. Too much work. I think I'll go watch a documentary...

-- David G. Brown
 

Rancor

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Jun 23, 2017
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Perhaps I have misunderstood. I thought the general consensus involved boiler room 6 flooding quite rapidly. 8 feet of water above the plates in 15 minutes. Is it now understood that the rate of flooding was such that there was time to draw fires and make an orderly exit up the escspe ladders?
 

Bobby Whalen

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Sep 8, 2018
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Perhaps I have misunderstood. I thought the general consensus involved boiler room 6 flooding quite rapidly. 8 feet of water above the plates in 15 minutes. Is it now understood that the rate of flooding was such that there was time to draw fires and make an orderly exit up the escape ladders?
Perhaps I have misunderstood. I thought the general consensus involved boiler room 6 flooding quite rapidly. 8 feet of water above the plates in 15 minutes. Is it now understood that the rate of flooding was such that there was time to draw fires and make an orderly exit up the escape ladders?
I was a little confused when it said Barret and Beauchamp and Shepard left very fast when the doors closed went back and it was 8 feet deep. These men were about 5.2 to 5.4
 

Rancor

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Jun 23, 2017
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I was a little confused when it said Barret and Beauchamp and Shepard left very fast when the doors closed went back and it was 8 feet deep. These men were about 5.2 to 5.4
Indeed such testimony has been subject to frequent and passionate debate among experts on this very forum. A couple of members who have posted above are often on opposing sides of the discussion but now seem to be in general agreement which has left me somewhat confused.