English football in 1912

S

Senan Molony

Member
Smith anchors defence as Belfast men sink
[Not the actual headline... see below]

Titanic Memorial Match

Linfield v. Blackburn Rovers


Played at the Linfield ground between the celebrated Blackburn Rovers team, winners of the English League championship and a strengthened team representing Linfield.

The game attracted 5,000 spectators, the gate, in aid of the Titanic relief fund, being £173.
Latherton scored for Blackburn, but soon afterwards McAuley (usually of Huddersfield) was brought down in the penalty area, and from the free [kick] McEwan sent into the net, making matters equal.

At half time the scores were Blackburn — one goal; Linfield — one goal.

Thereafter Clemell got a second goal for the visitors and Rovers now gave some nice exhibition playing, which, though clever, did not lead to goals. Final score: Blackburn two goals, Linfield one.

Teams:
Blackburn Rovers - Robinson, Crompton, Cowell, Walmsley, Smith (Capt.) [- okay I made that bit up. No indication of captains.], Cameron, Simpson, Latherton, Aitkenhead, Clemell and Anthony.

Linfield -- Scott, Willis, Craig, Rollo, Harris, Stewart, Houston, Lacey, McKnight, McAuley and McEwan.

Referee, Mr Bob Milne.

(Northern Whig, Monday May 13, 1912.)
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T

Tarn Stephanos

Member
What was the state of affairs of football in other parts of the Empire- In 1912, did Australia, India and parts of Africa have talented football teams?
 
B

Bob Godfrey

Member
Soccer in Australia? Nah, that's for poms and poofters, mate! Our Aussie members will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think rugby and Aussie Rules footy are the national sports down under (along with cricket), with soccer appealing mainly to the more recent immigrants from Britain and other parts of Europe.

In India, football tournaments were contested mainly by amateur teams representing British army regiments and ex-pat communities, but by 1912 these were becoming outclassed by local Indian teams who trained and played with great enthusiasm (and often with bare feet). Football is hugely popular in Africa today, but I don't think it had made much if any progress by 1912. In South Africa, it didn't help that that segregation policies eventually demanded separate Football Associations for whites, blacks, coloureds and Indians.
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John Lynott

John Lynott

Member
"What was the state of affairs of football in other parts of the Empire- In 1912, did Australia, India and parts of Africa have talented football teams?"

From The Ball Is Round - A Global History of Football by David Blatt

"The paradox of the global game, the emblematic sport of the imperial Pax Britannica, was not its overwhelming triumph in the outposts of the English-speaking world and the strongholds of the empire where it was first exported. What is notable is that it was in these societies that football was most fiercely rejected, resisted, bypassed or replaced."

For whatever reason football did not 'take off' in the 'white dominions' or the US to the same extent as it did in Europe and South America once it was exported by English and Scots expats. America already had baseball, Canada ice hockey and South Africa and New Zealand took to rugby union as sporting demonstrations of nationhood. Australia had the two rugby codes and its own 'rules' football which has similarities with Gaelic football in Ireland. It would only be in the later years of the 20th century that the 'beautiful game' would rise to some prominence in the US and Australia (thanks to Hispanic and southern European immigration) while in South Africa rugby union was perceived as the sport of the Afrikaaner ruling minority and football was the sport of the disenfranchised majority black population.
In nationalist Ireland football was seen as a 'garrison game' and for many years frowned upon by the chiefs of the Gaelic Athletic Association. However football did flourish in Dublin and in mainly-Catholic/Nationalist West Belfast which produced one of the north's finest clubs, Belfast Celtic.
Happily in the Republic of Ireland these days, football is now seen as in parity in popularity with Gaelic Football. Many play both codes and support the national team with the same fervour as they follow their county GAA team. Sadly, the national football team are now in the doldrums after a disastrous 2008 European Championships qualifying campaign. The Republic obviously did not have the luck of the English, but I digress.
Further football related items re the Titanic....
British hardback first edition of A Night To Remember pages 102-102 in the immediate aftermath of the sinking and the sounds drifting over the water...'To fireman George Kemish, tugging his oar in Boat 9, it sounded like a hundred thousand fans at a British football cup final.'

Titanic, triumph and tragedy, British first edition 1986 p 253. Picture caption: 'Trimmer A Hunt lights his brother's cigarette through the dock gates. One of his first questions to his brother was an inquiry about the latest football results.'

And of course Roy Keane, who I mention on my November 15 post, played for Cobh (Queenstown as was) Ramblers before heading off for Nottingham Forest!

One more point...I'm on a roll now...Colonel Gracie doesn't mention football in his accounts, but does say that cricket was his favourite game. Good old Colonel Gracie, what a remarkably well-rounded individual he must have been.
 
Dave Gittins

Dave Gittins

Member
Until fairly recently. soccer in Australia was very much a game played by immigrants. Teams had names like Polonia, Beograd and Marconi.

That's all changed now. We have a national league and the teams have largely lost their ethnic flavour. The game is now officially called football.

The standard of play has risen. In the last few days, we beat Nigeria in a friendly and Iraq in an Olympic Games qualifier. If we can enjoy success at international level, there's every chance that the round ball game will become our number two code. The two brands of rugby are really popular only in Queensland and New South Wales.
 
John Lynott

John Lynott

Member
- Dave, don't forget. You had a decent World Cup in Germany last year - 2006 - making it to the second round. Here's to General Monash, Bill Hunter, General Ming the Merciless Moreshead, Kylie, Tim Cahill, Spyforce, the Magic Boomerang, Chips Rafferty and Ed Deveraux - I think Skippy's trying to tell us something!
 
John Lynott

John Lynott

Member
...while we in the UK content ourselves with I'm A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here, Jodie Marsh, Victoria Beckham, Steve McClaren, queues at Heathrow and...looking out my window...persistent showers followed by constant rain!
 
Stanley C Jenkins

Stanley C Jenkins

Member
At the risk of going off at a tangent, am I right in thinking that West Ham had a maritime background, insofar as the team was originally associated with the Thameside ship yards and iron works hat had built ships such as The Great Eastern?
 
B

Bob Godfrey

Member
Yes, the team was originally Thames Ironworks FC until they turned pro and became West Ham United in 1900. Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Co was the biggest yard on the river and employed upwards of 6,000 men at its peak, so there was plenty of scope for finding talented amateur players among the workforce. Ultimately the yard didn't have the team's staying power, and like the Titanic they went down in 1912. But before that they built some of Britain's greatest warships, notably the magnificent HMS Warrior which is now restored and can be seen at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. They didn't build the Great Eastern, but they did supply ironwork for one of Brunel's bridges. For fans of football and/or shpbuilding, a Google image search will reveal plenty of online pics of both the team and the yard.
 
T

Tarn Stephanos

Member
I don't think football (soccer) ever took off in Canada- They love their hockey though-and curiously enough, they LOVE curling, which I think is a sport from Scotland..
 
T

Tarn Stephanos

Member
"Titanic Memorial Match"





By any chance were there any 'Empress of Ireland' or 'Lusitania' memorial matches?
 
T

Tarn Stephanos

Member
I was stunned when David Beckham came stateside- How did the British react to his defecting to a team in 'the colonies'?
 
Sam Brannigan

Sam Brannigan

Member
With cataclysmic apathy.

He has been going downhill for the past 4 years, but he still sells lot of merchandise.

Just don't expect George Best performances.
 
Stanley C Jenkins

Stanley C Jenkins

Member
Tarn, I think you mean how did the English react when David Beckham crossed the Atlantic? There are four teams within the UK (and five within the British Isles) and David Beckham only played for one of them! So how did the English react? With total indifference.
 
Sam Brannigan

Sam Brannigan

Member
I see Beckham has been dropped from the starting line up for England's crunch match against Croatia tonight.

Bet he comes on and scores the decisive goal in the last minute with a 35 yard free kick.

It wouldn't be the first time.
 
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