Escape ladders


Status
Not open for further replies.

Bryan Ciobanu

Member
Apr 22, 2005
66
0
156
It seems like this subject is on again... sorry but I would like to know to know.
There was an escape ladder in each Boiler Room, In front of and behind the Boiler casing, There is a door on E-Deck...(on the Boiler elevation plan) Is there any hatch there? Or is that door a WTDoor?
Then the ladder continues, and goes all the way up to Boat Deck.

Is this correct?

Regards
Bryan C
 
Jul 11, 2001
547
6
183
Hi Bryan,

I believe that only the vertical walls were water tight and had WTD doors in them. The decks a top the individual compartments did not have hatches. In theory the water in any compartment should never have reached above those decks due to settling. The design of the Olympic class ships in my opinion was very safe. The size of the compartment being large enough to allow for settling if the two adjoining ones were flooded, yet not spill over into the next one.

Plus, don't forget that all of the "above and beyond" improvements done to the Olympic and Britannic after the sinking did nothing to help the Britannics demise.
 
Aug 8, 2004
160
0
181
Indeed, but, did not Britannic suffer considerably worse damage than Titanic?
More, than it was designed to withstand?
Also, it appears the portholes were open,
which would have deeply contributed to a
faster sinking rate, as the sea now has
full access to the vessel's hull interior.
 
Jul 11, 2001
547
6
183
As far as I have read, the Britannics damage was not worse than the Titanics. The watertight doors were opened to allow the shift change when the explosion happened. Possibly the damage prevented one or more of the watertight doors from closing due to twisted bulkheads. The list and settling of the ship allowed the opened portholes in the undamaged compartments to take on more water. Thus water was coming in too many compartments dooming the ship. Another series of "what ifs?" What if the portholes were not open? Imagine the bragging White Star and H&W could have done if the Britannic limped to port with three or more flooded compartments!

So, how do you goof proof a ship after the Britannic? Make the portholes sealed? This is possible today with central air conditioning, but not back in the day. Perhaps make the watertight doors fully automatic like a supermarkets doors, this way they close after a person walks thru it. These two seemly simple things would probably saved the Britannic.

I guess no matter how well you build them, there comes along a situation that exceeds the worst case scenarios.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,661
871
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Indeed, but, did not Britannic suffer considerably worse damage than Titanic?
More, than it was designed to withstand?<<

I'm not of the opinion that Britannic's damage was, in and of itself, non-survivable. The problem here is that the very best protection can be trumped by the simple fact of nobody bothering to use it.

It would have helped enormously if the watertight doors had been closed below decks in the first place. The evidence of the doors found open on the wreck indicates that they weren't. Further, it would have prolonged the ship's life...perhaps long enough to save her by running her onto the beach...if the portholes had been closed as they should have been. All of this would have had the effect of confining the flooding to the area of the primary damage and slowing down the flooding if not stopping it dead in it's tracks.

Warships do this as a matter of routine in waters known to be mined and/or infested with hostile submarines, and that's why they do it.
 
Jul 11, 2001
547
6
183
Good point Michael! I recall that warships also have watertight decks with hatches that get closed to seal the compartment. Great for flooding, but no doubt any sailors below who don't get out in time.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,661
871
563
Easley South Carolina
>>I recall that warships also have watertight decks with hatches that get closed to seal the compartment.<<

To say nothing of such incidentals as the ventilation system. Britannic didn't have this kind of extensive protection and I don't think it would have done them a lot of good if they had. Workups for a warship involve constant drills which...among other things...train the crew in how to set the watertight boundries to best effect, and it takes up to a year for them to consistantly get it right! Commercial vessels with civilian crews don't have the time for that sort of thing.

Britannic shouldn't have needed it in any event. What they had was perfectly adaquate, but only if used properly.

It wasn't.
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,486
1,752
383
Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
Bryan: From the BOT Inquiry report, http://www.titanicinquiry.org/BOTInq/BOTReport/BOTRepAccomo.html:

Crew. - From each boiler room an escape or emergency ladder was provided direct to the Boat deck by the fidleys, in the boiler casings, and also into the working passage on E deck, and thence by the stair immediately forward of the reciprocating engine casing, direct to the Boat deck.

From both the engine rooms ladders and gratings gave direct access to the Boat deck.

From the electric engine room, the after tunnels, and the forward pipe tunnels, escapes were provided direct to the working passage on E deck, and thence by one of the several routes already detailed from that space.

From the crew's quarters they could go forward by their own staircases into the forward well, and thence, like the third class passengers, to the Boat deck.

The stewards' accommodation being all connected to the working passage or the forward main first class stairway, they could use one of the routes from thence.

The engineers' accommodation also communicated with the working passage, but, as it was possible for them to be shut between two watertight bulkheads, they had also a direct route by the gratings in the engine room casing to the Boat deck.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads