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Mar 28, 2002
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I found a newspaper cutting, Express and Star, dated 26th July 1995:

WIDOWER IN £40,000 DIVE TO FIND BODY

A desperate husband whose wife died in the Estonia ferry disaster spent more than £40,000 on a clandestine diving operation in a bid to find her body.
Peter Barasinski decided he had to find his 28-year old wife Carita's body after spending two years putting flowers on her empty grave in Upsala, Sweden.
He said: "The government was doing nothing about recovering the bodies 240ft down there on the sea-bed. I just could not mourn by an empty grave forever - by hook or by crook I had to give Carita a decent burial."
Mr Barasinski, aged 39, blew most of his £55,000 death payout on chartering a tug and hiring a remote controlled sub, with a camera and a mechanical arm.
A diving expert worked all night to get the sub into position, while a Swedish naval patrol boat, guarding the wreck, tried to force them away.
But the sub was unable to get to the spot where ferry hostess Carita's body was last seen.
Mr Barasinski cast a wreath of red roses into the water as the tug headed back to port and said: "Out at sea I feel closer to Carita than at any time since the disaster. I feel at peace with myself."
 
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Mikael Jonsson

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I saw a documentary about people diving in the wreck last week. There were bodies everywhere. Must be horrible to dive around hundreds of dead people. Monday this week it was exactelly 8 years since the ship sank. There can't be any use to try to recover bodies after 8 years in water. Must be hard to identify them.
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Tonight is the 8th anniverary of the Estonia disaster. On 28th September 1994, the ferry capsized and sank in stormy seas in the Baltic Sea after leaving Tallinn for Sweden. At least 852 people (some say 912) were killed and just 126 survived.
 
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