Ethel and Edward Beane

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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
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There is no record of Lifeboat #9 picking anyone out of the water. A lot of male survivors made similar claims about swimming for a long time before being hauled on board this or that lifeboat. It was almost always the result of survior's guilt, perhaps compounded later when they realized so many Third Class women and children had died.


No it isn't, especially if it did not happen. Once the Titanic impacted with the iceberg, it ceased to be romantic and became a death trap for many. Nearly 1500 people died that night.

And the book in which I read the Sad Fact (not Fun Fact) thought it was Lifeboat #13, so obviously it's difficult for historians to scrounge up all the facts. (Especially when survivors may have a tendency to exaggerate the truth/ whole truth/ nothing but the truth. Or trouble simply remembering exactly how it went, since they were in panic mode and then possibly freezing, with their heads not working too well.) Okay, scratch the word "romantic." All the people jumping to a frozen death was far from romantic. Tragic, yes. I read one account of the frozen corpses where children were seen still clinging to their mothers. :( What I meant is, it warmed my heart that Edward would go to such lengths to seek his beloved Ethel rather than allow the revenge of the fates to separate him from his newlywed. Many husbands/fathers accepted that they would be going down with the ship, that they were not allowed on the lifeboats, and did the manly thing by making sure their women/children folk were safely on the lifeboats. I wish more of them had at least tried to swim to their families out in the lifeboats. :( The lifeboats with room surely wouldn't have turned away a few who made it that far, since it wouldn't make them "swamped" with too many new life-boaters. Oh no, I feel a quote coming on...

I'm reminded of Atreyu's horse, Artax, sinking in the Swamps of Sadness:

“Fight against the Sadness, Artax. Please, you’re letting the Sadness of the Swamps get to you. You have to try. You have to care. For me. You’re my friend. I love you.”

 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
p.s. I read about the lifeboat(s) here: Titanic Survivors : Complete biographical list of Titanic survivors
If you don't mind me asking, how do we know if that writer had it all correct? I don't see his works cited? So how do we know if one resource is wrong and another right? (I've only just begun reading through various books). What if Edward was telling the truth, and he really did jump and swim to her? Many people did jump overboard, and some made it to the collapsable boats. I'm just so intrigued by the idea that Edward didn't want to give up so easily. I'm a sucker for a sweet story, I guess. (Even better when it is true!:
)

"...I've heard it said that a man would swim the ocean
Just to be with the one he loves
How many times has he broken that promise
It can never be done..."​
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
...No it isn't, especially if it did not happen. Once the Titanic impacted with the iceberg, it ceased to be romantic and became a death trap for many. Nearly 1500 people died that night....

Another sweet example I can think of is the ending of the historical fiction book, S.O.S. Titanic by Eve Bunting... his lady friend from 3rd class makes it onto a lifeboat, and he gives her a whistle so that he can swim out to her later (not immediately, so it's a bit of a swim)! And it all started with a lost mitten that he accidentally dropped from his 1st class deck -- below to a 3rd class dance. I did write a poem about this one, it's on my profile. :) As the old saying goes, "Is it true? Of course it's true! (But it may not have happened!)" ;)
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
It warms my heart to read that "Frederick Hoyt, who put his wife, Jane Hoyt, on board before the lifeboat (D) was lowered, then jumped into the sea and climbed in, too." (pg. 81 in Titanic: A Picture History of the Shipwreck that Shocked the World by Sean Callery. Scholastic-- Discover More series. 2014) I think that it was gentlemanly of him to help her in, and then manly to go after her -- more so than passively going down with the ship when it was the last chance on the last boat. He took a leap of faith! :) That demonstrated strength, bravery, and true love.
 
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Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
As I said before, nothing that happened that night on board the Titanic (which included so many children dying trapped below or elsewhere) was poetic or romantic and to try and represent events as such is stupid and in very bad taste. Therefore, I request you to stop this forthwith.

There is the possibility that some descendants of Titanic victims might be reading these posts.

Frederick Hoyt saw his wife on board Collapsible D and like many other men who had done just that with other boats (especially Lifeboat #4 about 15 minutes earlier), stood back on the deck. It is highly likely that Hoyt then jumped into the water after Josef Duquemin, a Third Class passenger and strongly built stonemason from Guernsey. Duquemin reached Collapsible D first, hauled himself on board and then persuaded the others to help Fred Hoyt too; in fact it might have been Duquemin who hauled Hoyt on board the lifeboat. Even though the two men had never met before, the wealthy and influential Hoyt later reportedly helped Duquemin to find a job in Stamford, Connecticut where the Hoyts had a summer home. Duquemin was originally headed for Albion, NY.
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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Moderator
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Another sweet example I can think of is the ending of the historical fiction book, S.O.S. Titanic by Eve Bunting... his lady friend from 3rd class makes it onto a lifeboat, and he gives her a whistle so that he can swim out to her later (not immediately, so it's a bit of a swim)! And it all started with a lost mitten that he accidentally dropped from his 1st class deck -- below to a 3rd class dance.
Please do not cite Titanic fiction in a thread, that is discussing actual passengers. It has no place here, only the facts.

If you don't mind me asking, how do we know if that writer had it all correct? I don't see his works cited?
Well first of all, this site and forum are very reputable and so, only articles by well-respected historians and researchers are published. Peter Engberg who happens to be a good friend of mine, goes by the many survivor accounts and has done an enormous amount of research over the years. His work is well known and respected.

So how do we know if one resource is wrong and another right?
By going by the evidence, such as survivor accounts, testimony at both the U.S. Inquiry and the British Board of Trade. You have to be able to weigh the evidence, separate fact from fiction and go by what the overwhelming majority states. Plus if it written by someone like Peter Engberg, it is more than likely correct - that is, unless some contradictory evidence all of a sudden comes to light which shatters all that belief.
 
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Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Peter Engberg who happens to be a good friend of mine, goes by the many survivor accounts and has done an enormous amount of research over the years. His work is well known and respected.
I agree completely. With listing the survivors in specific lifeboats for example, if there is any doubt or divided opinion about certain survivor(s), their name(s) is/are not mentioned in the list but on ther ET biography the reason for the uncertainty is mentioned. I think that approach is very professional and approrpiate for this kind of research.
 
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