Exact shade of red of Antifouling paint.

N

Nelsonarchie

Member
So what was the exact shade of red used on The antifouling paint of the Olympic Class Liners? Based on the remnants seen on the wreck, does anyone here have an estimation of what that paint used to look like before it spent 100 years on the ocean floor?

I'm workign on a shipbucket drawing and I also want to put the entire matter to rest. I've noticed that some miore recent artistic renditions of Titanic use a lighter somewhat pinkish color instead of the reddish brown color commonly used in artwork and models of the ship
 
Thomas Krom

Thomas Krom

Member
Good day to you Nelson,

The matter of the antifouling paint has been an interesting matter for some time now, based on the conclusions and actions of a talented planmaker and article writer. While I have nothing but praise for most of his work, I've been a bit skeptical of some of the colour claims made by him, as well as his attempt to censor people who offer any evidence against his theory.

Around 2018 the author, who was a former member of this forum, wrote his article where he believed that the wreck of the Titanic, which as you stated had been exposed on the bottom of the sea to salt water for over 98 years. He believed the Titanic had the antifouling colour which can only be described as more pink then red, of which I included a picture here below.
1662379025070




A few of my pals found this rather questionable, considering the aforementioned fact that the paint has been exposed for the elements for over 98 at the time the footage was filmed (the footage comes from the 2010 expedition). They wrote an article on the anti-fouling paint as evidence against it. However when the presented the author of the article their theory in a respectable and kind manner, they were pointed at to read the article of him again and after objecting to it considering they wrote the article to go against his statements he blocked them and made them unable to show their article to anyone else on Facebook. The bottom line is that they came to the conclusion that the colour of the hull was as here below:
1662379614816


While I have a lot of respect for the research conducted by the author, I do believe this behaviour is a bit childish so to say. While on this forum he was also quite mean against a pal of mine, saying that he wished there was an age restriction on this forum. It is his loss that he said those unkind things to the most talented wreck researcher I know, however.


Below listed are four PDF's, two of the author who stated that the Titanic had a pinkish-red antifouling paint and two from my pals who stated the antifouling paint was red. The later of which are complimented from the Titanic Enchantress of the Sea project.



I hope this helps you out.


Kind regards,


Thomas
 

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  • Titanics-Antifouling-Paint.pdf
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  • Titanics-Antifouling-Paint-revised.pdf
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  • Case_Of_Titanics_Antifouling_Paint.docx.pdf
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  • Titanics_Antifouling.pdf
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InkMot

InkMot

Member
The issue I have with the article claiming that the paint was closer to pink was that it ignored the issue of backscatter and it’s affect on light- particularly red light waves - underwater. The light waves bounce off of, and are refracted by, water molecules and floating particles in any body of water. This has a drastic affect on color value, hue and saturation. IIRC, the author asserted that, since the photos were taken with “full-spectrum“ lighting, the colors would be accurate. This is incorrect for two reasons: 1. Full spectrum lighting does not reproduce sunlight and, in fact, covers only a portion of the visible light spectrum. “full spectrum lighting” is a marketing term. (Google full spectrum lighting); 2. Even objects lit by full sunlight (e.g. coral reefs) are affected by back scatter, making full spectrum lighting irrelevant. The bottom line is that photos taken underwater - even in shallow, clear water with full sunlight - tend to have a blue-green cast and desaturation of colors. His “pink” is a desaturated and green-tinted, red.

Check out this web page for an example: Why Do Underwater Photos Look Blue and Green? » ItsJustLight.com

There is an excellent white-paper on the science of this that I’ve been unable to locate again. It describes the problem and shows the results of a Photoshop plug-in the authors developed which “removes the water”. What I like about it is there are color swatch test photos with a color swatch that looks JUST LIKE the darker red in @Thomas Krom’s example that becomes PINK underwater. I’ll post it if I find it.
 
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InkMot

InkMot

Member
The issue I have with the article claiming that the paint was closer to pink was that it ignored the issue of backscatter and it’s affect on light- particularly red light waves - underwater. The light waves bounce off of, and are refracted by, water molecules and floating particles in any body of water. This has a drastic affect on color value, hue and saturation. IIRC, the author asserted that, since the photos were taken with “full-spectrum“ lighting, the colors would be accurate. This is incorrect for two reasons: 1. Full spectrum lighting does not reproduce sunlight and, in fact, covers only a portion of the visible light spectrum. “full spectrum lighting” is a marketing term. (Google full spectrum lighting); 2. Even objects lit by full sunlight (e.g. coral reefs) are affected by back scatter, making full spectrum lighting irrelevant. The bottom line is that photos taken underwater - even in shallow, clear water with full sunlight - tend to have a blue-green cast and desaturation of colors. His “pink” is a desaturated and green-tinted, red.

Check out this web page for an example: Why Do Underwater Photos Look Blue and Green? » ItsJustLight.com

There is an excellent white-paper on the science of this that I’ve been unable to locate again. It describes the problem and shows the results of a Photoshop plug-in the authors developed which “removes the water”. What I like about it is there are color swatch test photos with a color swatch that looks JUST LIKE the darker red in @Thomas Krom’s example that becomes PINK underwater. I’ll post it if I find it.
Woo-hoo! I found it! This algorithm removes water from underwater photos, and they look incredible
Check out the photo below. Note the reds on the color test card.
 

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Rose F.

Rose F.

Member
One other thing is: I don't know if he also averaged multiple samples, though I would assume he did. Depending on where in the image you take the sample, the colour will vary significantly. Most of the areas I sampled tended to be significantly darker and closer to purple than the conclusion he came to. And that's not even touching the scale effect and if his choice in colour reflects that.
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
One other thing is: I don't know if he also averaged multiple samples, though I would assume he did. Depending on where in the image you take the sample, the colour will vary significantly. Most of the areas I sampled tended to be significantly darker and closer to purple than the conclusion he came to. And that's not even touching the scale effect and if his choice in colour reflects that.
Another factor that might come into play was if there were multiple samples averaged I would think that the same ROV would be needed to have been used. Different ROV's different shades of white light illuminating the samples. Just a possibility as I don't know if that was the case. Just theorizing. Cheers.
 
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